Gena Rowlands

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Gena Rowlands - 88th Annual Academy (Oscars) Awards held at Hollywood & Highland Center - Arrivals at Hollywood & Highland Center in Hollywood, Oscars - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 28th February 2016

Gena Rowlands
Gena Rowlands

Gena Rowlands - World premiere gala screening of 'By the Sea' at TCL Chinese Theater - Red Carpet Arrivals at TCL Chinese 6 Theatres - Hollywood, California, United States - Thursday 5th November 2015

Gena Rowlands
Gena Rowlands
Gena Rowlands
Gena Rowlands
Gena Rowlands

Gena Rowlands - AFI FEST 2015 Presented By Audi Opening Night Gala Premiere Of Universal Pictures' "By The Sea" at TCL Chinese 6 Theatres - Hollywood, California, United States - Friday 6th November 2015

Gena Rowlands
Gena Rowlands
Gena Rowlands
Gena Rowlands

Gena Rowlands - AFI Fest Presented by Audi Opening Night Gala "By The Sea" Premiere at TCL Chinese Theater - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 6th November 2015

Gena Rowlands

Zoe Cassavetes, Nick Cassavetes and Gena Rowlands - Gena Rowlands honoured with a hand and footprint ceremony at the TCL Chinese Theatre - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 5th December 2014

Zoe Cassavetes, Nick Cassavetes and Gena Rowlands
Nick Cassavetes and Gena Rowlands
Nick Cassavetes and Gena Rowlands
Nick Cassavetes and Gena Rowlands
Nick Cassavetes and Gena Rowlands
Nick Cassavetes and Gena Rowlands

Night On Earth Review


Very Good
Riding around five shaded cityscapes in four different countries, Jim Jarmusch's nocturnal delight Night on Earth has the esteem of being the auteur's most accessible exercise to date while also being his least seen. After its premiere at the 29th New York Film Festival, this set of through-the-windshield vignettes was picked up for a short theatrical run in May of 1992 before it was released on VHS and only released on DVD in foreign markets (Australia put out two separate editions). That was until those noblest practitioners of cinephilia over at Criterion took a special interest in Jarmusch, releasing both Earth and his 1984 opus Stranger Than Paradise, which also includes the director's fascinating debut feature Permanent Vacation.

Throughout the course of one night, we are driven around in five separate taxi cabs that range from familiar ports of L.A. and New York City to the echoing streets of Paris and Rome to the final ride through the frozen-over metropolis of Helsinki, right as the sun is rising. In Los Angeles, a big-time agent (Gena Rowlands) tries to seduce her rough-and-tumble cab driver (an insolent Winona Ryder) into becoming an actress. While in New York, a jerky Brooklynite (the superb Giancarlo Esposito) teaches his German cab driver (Armin Mueller-Stahl) how to drive, talk, and jive correctly while also trying to escort his sister-in-law (Rosie Perez) home.

Continue reading: Night On Earth Review

Broken English Review


Weak
Don't you just love Parker Posey? She's such an original talent, and it's irksome to see her do so well in a film that just doesn't cut it. Broken English plays like a tired retread of Sex and the City, with all the same preoccupations and issues but with none of the fun. Posey gives it her best shot, but she has little to work with.

Nora (Posey) is a thirty-something hotel concierge specializing in VIP guests, but her life has little glamour. When not tending to the VIPs, she's home drinking red wine, popping sleeping pills, and wondering why she can't find just one nice man. A fifth-anniversary party for her best friend Audrey (Drea DeMatteo) adds insult to injury, even as her own mom (Gena Rowlands, director Zoe Cassavetes's mother) tries to cheer her up.

Continue reading: Broken English Review

Paris, Je T'aime Review


Good
One would like to think that there at least a few other cities in the world besides Paris that could have inspired a film as varied in the types of cinematic pleasure so ably delivered by the anthology piece Paris Je T'Aime -- but it seems unlikely. This isn't due to an unavailability of good stories or locations in many other great metropolises, but more because being able to dangle the possibility of shooting in Paris in front of the world's greatest directors is going to be so much more enticing. Also, there are few other cities besides Paris that come with such a powerful and multifarious wealth of preassociated images and emotions for both filmmaker and audience to both draw upon and react against. So what could have been a collection of short films with a few highs, several lows, and a lot of muddled in-betweens is in fact a remarkably and consistently imaginative body of work, practically giddy with energy, that only rarely touches the ground.

Project overseers Emmanuel Benbihy and Tristan Carné wanted to create a cinematic map of Paris, with each short film representing one of the city's 20 arrondissements (neighborhoods). They ended up with 18 films, none of them more than a few minutes long and directed by a glittering, international roster of filmmakers. While none of the films here are anything approaching masterpieces, hardly a one is in any way a chore to sit through, which has to be some sort of an accomplishment.

Continue reading: Paris, Je T'aime Review

A Woman Under The Influence Review


Good
John Cassavetes' pioneering independent film represents a hallmark of the indie scene, but at its heart is an excellent story told exceedingly badly. Low production values (bad focus, etc.) can be forgiven, but a rambling, 2 1/2 hour, directionless pace can not. Cassavetes cast wife Gena Rowlands as a clearly-going-insane woman, earning her an Oscar nomination. The story of her fall, rise, and fall again is vaguely reminiscent of Long Day's Journey Into Night.

Cassavetes gets credit for the homage this picture still is paid. The monotone piano music is hauntingly similar to that in Eyes Wide Shut. Remember that music and be warned: Even on DVD, this picture has the worst sound I've ever heard on a feature film. Shame on the studio for not cleaning it up for the digital release.

Continue reading: A Woman Under The Influence Review

Gloria (1980) Review


Bad
John Cassavetes made some iffy movies during his career, but none is worse than the original Gloria, one of many films made with with his wife Gena Rowlands and proving that even her natural charm and ability can't muster its way through one of the worst stories ever told. Straight out of a Hallmark card comes this story of a pistol-totin' bad mama who protects a little Puerto Rican kid on the streets of New York from the hands of the mob. This movie is so saccharine and at the same time ridiculous that it's impossible to take seriously. And yet it goes on and on and on for over two hours. Appalling.

She's So Lovely Review


Weak
Nick Cassavetes, working from his father's script, practically remakes his father's film A Woman Under the Influence, with even less charm that the original. For starters, the film makes practically no sense at all. "She" in this movie, is Robin Wright, who is made to look as un-lovely as you can imagine and with a phony accent so bad as to drive you to the bottle. Her man is Sean Penn, a wacked-out, two-bit lowlife, with whom she is inexplicably involved... until one day, when he snaps, sending him to the loony bin for 10 years. Wright, meet Travolta, who get married and have kids, until our buddy Sean gets out of the mental ward, gets a dumb haircut, and steals his lady away from her suburban family.

Continue reading: She's So Lovely Review

The Notebook Review


Weak
With just four films under Nick Cassavetes's belt, it's almost unfair to compare the director to his trailblazing father. In the case of The Notebook, however, it's unavoidable.

Thanks to papa John (Husbands, Gloria), the name Cassavetes has come to symbolize intrepid, no-apologies filmmaking and the unconventional human interaction within Now, 15 years after the maverick's death, his heir has traveled to the opposite pole, adapting a Nicholas Sparks novel into a standard tearjerker, filling the screen with handfuls of manipulative Hollywood clichés.

Continue reading: The Notebook Review

Faces Review


OK
Widely considered the first "mainstream" independent film, Faces earned three Oscar nominations and wide acclaim for a cast acting itse way through two hours of intense arguments and situations regarding infidelity and the meaninglessness of life. From John Cassavetes, who treads on these subject continually, comes this rambling and ultimately uninspired film, intentionally made to look cheap and lacking in much resolution. Seymour Cassel turns in the most interesting performance, achieved largely through screaming at the top of his lungs. Check out Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? or even A Streetcar Named Desire for better renditions of some of these ideas.

Continue reading: Faces Review

Something To Talk About Review


Weak
This is one of those reviews that's going to garner plenty of nasty mail from disgruntled readers, but I feel it's my obligation to let you know exactly what you're getting into with Something to Talk About.

If you are a female, preferably married, preferably Southern, preferably jilted by your husband, and preferably interested in horses, you'll love this film. If not, you're screwed. Something to Talk About is the story of a married, Southern, jilted female, Grace (Julia Roberts), who works for her father (Robert Duvall) at his horse-breeding ranch. When she finds husband Eddie (Dennis Quaid) with another woman, she dumps him like week-old halibut and heads off into the land of reckless self-indulgence, revenge, and wacky hijinks with her dysfunctional family.

Continue reading: Something To Talk About Review

The Skeleton Key Review


Weak

A first-rate concept for a spine-tingling tale of voodoo, hoodoo and possible hauntings in the swampy Louisiana bayou, "The Skeleton Key" is rendered impotent by bland, generic execution.

The wannabe chiller stars Kate Hudson as a New Orleans hospice nurse named Caroline who takes a job at a remote, run-down plantation manor, looking after a mute and paralyzed elderly stroke victim (played with eerie, deceptive vacancy by John Hurt) in what will probably be his last weeks of life.

Caroline is selfish, snooping and disrespectful (having an unsympathetic heroine is another of the movie's problems), so soon she beings sticking her nose where it doesn't belong -- opening attic doors that have been locked for decades and digging into the house's history. Doing so raises the ire of her patient's bitterly old-fashioned and superstitious Southern wife (Gena Rowlands), but more importantly it puts the skeptical Caroline on a path toward believing in the ghosts of lynched former servants that the old lady claims haunt the place.

Continue reading: The Skeleton Key Review

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Gena Rowlands Movies

Paris, Je T'aime Movie Review

Paris, Je T'aime Movie Review

One would like to think that there at least a few other cities in the...

The Notebook Movie Review

The Notebook Movie Review

With just four films under Nick Cassavetes's belt, it's almost unfair to compare the director...

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Taking Lives Movie Review

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Taking Lives - it's a title to file under the goofy film names category. It's...

The Skeleton Key Movie Review

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Set in and around Louisiana's swampy back waters, The Skeleton Key dabbles profusely in Hoodoo,...

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