Gary Sinise

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Gary Sinise - 4th Annual CBS Television Studios Summer Soiree at Palihouse - Arrivals - West Hollywood, California, United States - Thursday 2nd June 2016

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Gary Sinise - The CBS, The CW, and Showtime 2015 Summer TCA Party at Pacific Design Center - Arrivals at Pacific Design Center - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 10th August 2015

Gary Sinise

Gary Sinise - Celebrities attend the CBS, The CW, and Showtime 2015 Summer TCA Party at Pacific Design Center. at Pacific Design Center - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 11th August 2015

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Gary Sinise - The 3rd Annual Noble Awards at The Beverly Hilton Hotel - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Saturday 28th February 2015

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Gary Sinise - Gary Sinise and the Lieutenant Dan Band perform live on Freemont Street as part of a free Veterans Day concert. - Las Vegas, Nevada, United States - Sunday 10th November 2013

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Open Season Review


Weak
There was a time, not too long ago, when there was one great computer-animated film per year, and that was it. Then, seemingly overnight, there were a dozen computer-animated films every year, and every single one of them had to do with an animal trying to find its home. This year is no exception; Over the Hedge, Ice Age: The Meltdown, and The Wild have already been released and there's still at least two more coming out before the end of the year and probably four others that escape my mind. Tacked onto this ever-growing list is Open Season, the latest from The Lion King director Roger Allers.

In a small rural town where camping and hunting are daily parts of life, Boog (Martin Lawrence) has a damn good life...99 for a grizzly bear, that is. He does a show with his friend, park ranger Beth (Debra Messing), and has a nice little bed and three meals a day in her basement. Then one day, Boog frees a deer named Elliot (Ashton Kutcher) from the hood of dumb-as-brick hunter Shaw's (Gary Sinise) truck. Elliot considers this an act of eternal friendship and begins to follow Boog around everywhere, eventually causing Boog to lose his show with Beth. Without a home or means of livelihood, Boog is sent back to the forest with Elliot. Here, Boog must find his inner bear (did I just type that?) and Elliot must find the courage to stand up to head buck Ian (Patrick Warburton). All of this happens while the pair are also trying to find their way back home and attempting to not get killed by Shaw.

Continue reading: Open Season Review

Open Season Review


Weak
There was a time, not too long ago, when there was one great computer-animated film per year, and that was it. Then, seemingly overnight, there were a dozen computer-animated films every year, and every single one of them had to do with an animal trying to find its home. This year is no exception; Over the Hedge, Ice Age: The Meltdown, and The Wild have already been released and there's still at least two more coming out before the end of the year and probably four others that escape my mind. Tacked onto this ever-growing list is Open Season, the latest from The Lion King director Roger Allers.

In a small rural town where camping and hunting are daily parts of life, Boog (Martin Lawrence) has a damn good life... for a grizzly bear, that is. He does a show with his friend, park ranger Beth (Debra Messing), and has a nice little bed and three meals a day in her basement. Then one day, Boog frees a deer named Elliot (Ashton Kutcher) from the hood of dumb-as-brick hunter Shaw's (Gary Sinise) truck. Elliot considers this an act of eternal friendship and begins to follow Boog around everywhere, eventually causing Boog to lose his show with Beth. Without a home or means of livelihood, Boog is sent back to the forest with Elliot. Here, Boog must find his inner bear (did I just type that?) and Elliot must find the courage to stand up to head buck Ian (Patrick Warburton). All of this happens while the pair are also trying to find their way back home and attempting to not get killed by Shaw.

Continue reading: Open Season Review

It's The Rage Review


Bad
Quite a cast has been assembled for this Altman-esque tale of interlocked lives, all clamoring around the "serious social problem" of gun control. While there's no denying that the USA has over fifty million gun owners and it's a subject worthy of address and debate, this movie thuddingly hits the same numb point over and over again: guns are bad, guns can kill. That's about as resonant as It's the Rage will get.

Jeff Daniels and Joan Allen play a miserable suburban couple whose marriage is disrupted by an accidental shooting in their living room at midnight. As it turns out, the guy was Daniels' business partner. Allen moves out in disgust and, through a process of self-discovery, figures out that her happy little life was nothing more than a middle class prison. She hides away at her new workplace, in the employ of eccentric millionaire and computer guru Gary Sinise. Daniels sits at home fuming, renting pornography and playing with his gun.

Continue reading: It's The Rage Review

The Human Stain Review


Weak
Miramax makes its initial bid for Oscar gold with The Human Stain, Robert Benton's torpid adaptation of Philip Roth's acclaimed novel about race and sex and lots of other "big" issues such as the price one pays - emotionally, psychologically, professionally - for attempting to flee both the past and one's true self. Yet this lifelessly structured film feels like a puzzle with too many identical parts, each character merely another example of the film's painfully obvious moral lessons. Throw in some ridiculous miscasting and a facile Clinton-Lewinsky scandal backdrop, and what you've got is a film drunk on its own highfalutin melodrama.

Anthony Hopkins is Coleman Silk, a Classics professor at a Massachusetts university, who, because of an alleged racial epithet (he refers to delinquent African-American students as "spooks"), is not only forced into early retirement, but also into unexpected bachelorhood after his wife suddenly drops dead from the news. Coleman is an erudite Jewish man who harbors a great secret about his past, and soon his tortured life has become intertwined with kindred souls. He befriends the reclusive Nathan Zuckerman (Gary Sinise), a novelist who has retired to a remote cabin after a cancer scare has left him petrified of his own mortality. Soon afterwards, he meets a striking post office janitor named Faunia Farley (Nicole Kidman), who, because of a former marriage and a terrible accident, fervently shuns the outside world. Coleman and Faunia strike up a May-December romance, much to the chagrin of both Faunia's loco ex-husband Lester (Ed Harris) and a community whose fascination with Clinton's sexual indiscretions hints at an illogical obsession with political correctness.

Continue reading: The Human Stain Review

Ransom Review


Excellent
Ransom is a smarter than your average thriller about a hostage situation. It contains intelligent characters who constantly try to outwit each other. The film doesn't take a lot of risks, but it packs surprise after surprise, and the strong central character and his performance keeps the movie above water... even if it could have been better.

The ever-popular Mel Gibson stars as a wealthy airline owner named Tom Mullen, who lives with his wife, Kate (Rene Russo), and son, Sean (Brawly Nolte), in Central Park. Kate and Tom take Sean to a science fair where several money hungry thieves kidnap him. The villains are not terrorists, not psychopaths, not serial killers, but rather three-dimensional, ordinary people. The movie gives the bad guys a lot of color and screen time; and we eventually care about their fate as well as the fate of the Mullen family.

Continue reading: Ransom Review

Forrest Gump Review


Excellent
Run, Forrest, run! It sure seemed great at the time, but Gump is aging, and it's starting to show a wrinkle or too. Recently I sat down to watch the double-disc DVD release, and I still found it fresh and smile-provoking, but boy if it isn't a sickly sweet experience.

But what a crazy chain of events Forrest Gump has spawned: a poorly-received book sequel, a restaurant chain, and hordes of imitators -- not to mention a critical backlash.

Continue reading: Forrest Gump Review

The Forgotten Review


Good
Wrap your brain around this one. It has been 14 months since grieving mother Telly Paretta (Julianne Moore) lost her son, Sam, in a plane crash that took the lives of 10 other children. She's been seeing a psychiatrist (Gary Sinise) on a regular basis, and the shrink has helped her cope with her sadness as the two discuss how difficult it is to let memories of loved ones fade.

Until one day, when all the physical mementos of Sam actually do disappear from Telly's life. Photo albums once filled with snapshots are now blank. Actual fade or Photoshop trick? Drawers that held baseball gloves and caps are now empty. Something wicked this way comes.

Continue reading: The Forgotten Review

The Big Bounce (2004) Review


Terrible
Near the end of The Big Bounce, Owen Wilson's character tells the woman who has just conned him, "I have to be sober to tell this story." In my opinion, only a drunk would be able explain (or BS) his way through this mess of a movie, a remake of an equally bad film of the same name from 1969. Both films are based on the novel from acclaimed author Elmore Leonard, and though Leonard may be able to pen a worth-reading novel, it's plain to see that transposing his words into a worth-viewing film is often an impossible task.

In this Bounce, Wilson plays vagabond Jack Ryan, a man who's bad luck and bad choices have landed him on the North Shore of Oahu where he takes a job in construction working for shady hotel developer Ray Ritchie (Gary Sinise) and his assistant Bob Jr. (Charlie Sheen). It's not long before Jack gets fired and finds new employment as a handyman at a complex of vacation bungalows owned by Judge Walter Crewes (Morgan Freeman). While working for Crewes, Jack becomes enamored with Nancy Hayes (Sara Foster, the poor man's Bridget Fonda), Ritchie's sexpot girlfriend and house-sitter while he escorts his wife (Bebe Neuwirth) on shopping trips in Honolulu. Nancy has a plan to milk Ritchie out of $200,000, and she needs Jack's help to pull it off.

Continue reading: The Big Bounce (2004) Review

Impostor Review


Very Good
Not long ago, some genius a lot smarter than me decided it might be nice if instead of just one sheep, we could have two. Thus began man's obsession with cloning: an obsession that, for better or worse, has somehow managed to spill over into your local cineplex. Some days I wish they'd never cloned that damn sheep at all.

Impostor is Hollywood's latest cloning experiment. Based on a short story by futurist Philip K. Dick, Impostor takes place in a future far away, when man is at war with an alien race. Spencer Olham (Gary Sinise) is on the front lines of weapons development to combat man's alien threat. But one day, things go horribly wrong and Spencer finds himself accused by the military of being an alien replicant, with an assassin's bomb implanted in his chest. Unable to believe he is anyone other than himself, Spencer escapes to search for the truth.

Continue reading: Impostor Review

The Green Mile Review


Good

"The Green Mile" begins with a little deja vu. Like Tom Hanks' last mid-Century, Oscar-baiting drama, "Saving Private Ryan," it's bookended by a modern framework that finds an old man reluctantly reminiscing about a difficult year of his life, more than half a century ago.

Because of the familiar faces and the similar prestige posturing, this platitudinous structure invites a little eye-rolling as Dabbs Greer (Reverend Alden on "Little House On the Prairie"), playing the aged Hanks, begins to spin what becomes an engrossing three-hour yarn about a year of extraordinary horrors and miracles on death row in a Louisiana state penitentiary.

Hanks plays prison guard Paul Edgecomb, an unjaded joe in charge of death row who treats people on both sides of the bars with humanity and civility. Set in 1935, the central story opens with the arrival of a kindly colossus of a condemned killer named John Coffey (Michael Clarke Duncan).

Continue reading: The Green Mile Review

Gary Sinise

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Gary Sinise

Date of birth

17th March, 1955

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.75






Gary Sinise Movies

Open Season Movie Review

Open Season Movie Review

There was a time, not too long ago, when there was one great computer-animated film...

Open Season Movie Review

Open Season Movie Review

There was a time, not too long ago, when there was one great computer-animated film...

Open Season Trailer

Open Season Trailer

Open Season Trailer In Sony Pictures Animation's first feature film, the animated action adventure comedy...

It's the Rage Movie Review

It's the Rage Movie Review

Quite a cast has been assembled for this Altman-esque tale of interlocked lives, all clamoring...

The Human Stain Movie Review

The Human Stain Movie Review

Miramax makes its initial bid for Oscar gold with The Human Stain, Robert Benton's torpid...

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Ransom Movie Review

Ransom Movie Review

Ransom is a smarter than your average thriller about a hostage situation. It contains...

The Forgotten Movie Review

The Forgotten Movie Review

Wrap your brain around this one. It has been 14 months since grieving mother Telly...

Apollo 13 Movie Review

Apollo 13 Movie Review

Ron Howard has arrived.I scarcely know where to start writing about Apollo 13, the long-awaited...

Reindeer Games Movie Review

Reindeer Games Movie Review

Reindeer Games is one of those movies that thinks so much of itself it sports...

Albino Alligator Movie Review

Albino Alligator Movie Review

One of a growing list of recent directorial debuts by actors, Albino Alligator is Kevin...

Mission to Mars Movie Review

Mission to Mars Movie Review

Mission to Mars starts out with so much promise, it's hard to believe it could...

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