Gabriel Macht

Gabriel Macht

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Premiere of 'Bloodline'

Gabriel Macht and Jacinda Barrett - Shots of a host of stars as they took to the red carpet for the Premiere of the new Netflix original series 'Bloodline' The premiere was held at the SVA Theatre in New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 3rd March 2015

NBC TCA Winter 2014 Press Tour

Gabriel Macht - NBC TCA Winter 2014 Press Tour - Pasadena, California, United States - Sunday 19th January 2014

Gabriel Macht
Gabriel Macht
Gabriel Macht
Gabriel Macht

USA Network and Mr Porter.com Present 'A Suits Story'

Gabriel Macht - Gabriel Macht, Jeremy Lang Meade and Patrick J. Adams Tuesday 12th June 2012 USA Network and Mr Porter.com Present 'A Suits Story'

USA Network and Mr Porter.com Present 'A Suits Story'

Gabriel Macht - Gabriel Macht and Patrick J. Adams Tuesday 12th June 2012 USA Network and Mr Porter.com Present 'A Suits Story'

Love & Other Drugs Review


Excellent
This engaging film blends a true story with fiction, morphing from a rom-com into a moving drama as it goes along. In addition, it's a sharply well-aimed jab at the pharmaceutical world. Although it also has a tendency to be cute and fluffy, even when the plot turns serious.

In 1996, Jamie (Gyllenhaal) has discovered his gift as a salesman, mainly peddling his own charms to every young woman he meets. In need of a higher-paying job, he trains as a Pfizer pharmaceutical rep in the Ohio River Valley. It takes awhile to learn the ropes, and sales are tough due to a fierce rival (Macht). But when Pfizer introduces Viagra, his numbers improve dramatically, to say the least. Meanwhile, he meets Maggie (Hathaway), a feisty young woman with early-stage Parkinson's who challenges his view of himself.

Continue reading: Love & Other Drugs Review

Love And Other Drugs Trailer


Jamie is the kind of guy who doesn't like commitment, sex and fun are the main things he looks for from the opposite sex and he enjoys his current way of life. A pharmaceutical salesman by trade, his job is another hugely important part of his life, when his company begin to sell a new male performance enhancing drug on the market, he feel it's a brilliant way of making money.

Continue: Love And Other Drugs Trailer

The Spirit Review


Excellent
It's been too long since we've had a proper comic book superhero on the screen. There's been enough of them running around and bashing up the bad guys in a CGI-enhanced fashion, that's for sure. But it's hard to look at the recent cinematic incarnations of Tony Stark and Bruce Wayne and call them "superheroes;" even if they keep their identities secret and have nifty outfits. "Billionaire action figures" would be more appropriate, what with all their high-priced gadgetry and super-duper hideouts. Whatever happened to the caped heroes who kept an eye on the city's dark alleys and took out the bad guys with nothing more than a sock to the jaw?

Frank Miller's jazzy The Spirit answers that question with a cocky wink and a grin. The streets of Central City are almost always dark and threatening, but they're watched over by a guardian who used to be a cop named Denny Colt (Gabriel Macht, wonderfully deadpan). One near-death experience later and Colt has dug himself out of his own grave. He then decides to serve the city as a masked avenger known as The Spirit, whose only weapons are a newfound ability to absorb ridiculous amounts of punishment and his fists.

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Because I Said So Review


Terrible
How did we get here? Michael Lehmann's career seemed like one of those no-brainers, destined to slowly pour a mixture of cyanide, ammonia, and pop rocks into the drinking well of modern teen romps and romantic comedies. A debut film tends to state a director's intentions, and Heathers was the sort of debut that said "lock up your prom dresses and get out your garter belts, this ain't gonna be pretty." Somewhere, these intentions were lost like a mentally ill turtle that surprisingly found itself in the toilet bowl.

Heathers sashayed into theaters in 1989 and since then, Lehmann has turned in nothing but guilty pleasures and unfathomable duds. In hindsight, one could have never seen the man behind Hudson Hawk, My Giant, 40 Days and 40 Nights, and The Truth About Cats & Dogs also being responsible for one of the most influential films of the 1980's. But here we are: 18 years after Heathers, Lehmann reduces his talent to a spasmodic headache about... sweet Jesus, you got me.

Continue reading: Because I Said So Review

Behind Enemy Lines Review


OK
A film like Behind Enemy Lines reminds you of how the movies can so easily be used for government propaganda during times of crisis. During WWII, local cinemas were littered with the likes of John Wayne, Jimmy Stewart, and Gary Cooper fighting for freedom and the American Way against Nazi bastards and ruthless Japanese. Vietnam and the Cold War also had their propaganda films -- Rambo, anyone? In more recent times, the Gulf War and the Serbian conflict have also become the targets of eager filmmakers, but the public hasn't really accepted these films -- apparently the scale of the conflicts has not been enough to make much of an impact on an apathetic populace.

But that all changed on September 11, when American support for patriotism and military might -- no matter who the adversary -- hit a sudden, fever pitch. And so it was that the spring 2002 release (a dumping ground for films with very low expectations) of Behind Enemy Lines was pole-vaulted forward to the holiday heyday of November 30, 2001, buoyed by sky-high audience approval at test screenings. You want your ripped-from-today's-headlines movie? You got it.

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A Love Song For Bobby Long Review


Weak
In a year-end blitz of small films about dysfunctional, broken families (e.g., Around the Bend) comes this variation on the theme set in a tacky section of New Orleans. While a confident cast ultimately makes something of the drama, a certain awkwardness in the storytelling sets up discordant side tracks as it attempts to live up to its title.

Purslane "Pursy" Hominy Will (Scarlett Johansson) has lived most of her 18-year life without the mother from whom she's estranged but whose memory she cherishes. As a teenage independent she's become hardened and jaded beyond her years. When her live-in boyfriend tells her that he received word of Lorraine's death several days after the fact, she rages at the dumbshit for neglecting to let her know right away. She storms out of the house with all her possessions and buses her way from Florida back to the town she grew up in and to her childhood home, a day too late to make the funeral.

Continue reading: A Love Song For Bobby Long Review

American Outlaws Review


Terrible
Not so long ago, men by the names of Peckinpah, Ford, Leone, and Eastwood made westerns. Real westerns. These were some of the best films of the twentieth century.

Those days are gone. Now we have crap like Wild Wild West to pass for the western. And that record is not improved with the unbearable tale of American Outlaws.

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The Recruit Review


OK
Rarely do I have any trouble coming up with a way to lead into a movie review. But The Recruit has really thrown me a puzzle. Do I say something about its slick Hollywood production values and typically over-the-top performance by Al Pacino? Do I comment on its wealth of technical implausibilities? Or should I say something about how you should never trust a redhead, newbie spy James's (Colin Farrell) first obvious mistake in the film?

None of these leads really grabbed me, but then again, neither did The Recruit. It's a glossy and well-massaged thriller, designed to give you two hours of eye candy and gently massage your brain -- but not too much! After all, a fickle mass audience might be weighing their investment against the simplicity of Kangaroo Jack.

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Bad Company Review


Weak
For the second consecutive weekend, the movie industry's biggest release involves the CIA dealing with a rogue nuclear weapon that's landed in the U.S. via American-hating zealots. Is Hollywood tapping into our worst terrors or distancing us from them by placing them on that giant screen of fantasies? Last week it was political potboiler The Sum of All Fears; this week's entry is a comedy. A comedy about terrorism?! No wonder Touchstone twice delayed the release of Bad Company.

Even when subject matter strikes an uncomfortable nerve, folks are still going to show up for a movie that stars Anthony Hopkins as a cold, emotionless career CIA man and Chris Rock as an unsuspecting agent-in-training, so it's necessary to discuss whether or not the film works. Sometimes Bad Company does, but often, it does not.

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101 Ways (The Things A Girl Will Do To Keep Her Volvo) Review


OK
101 ways? I only count two: waitressing and being a phone sex operator.

Jennifer B. Katz's lighthearted fable about love and bankruptcy is amusing and lightly entertaining, though its heroine Watson (Wendy Hoopes, best known as the voice of Jane and Quinn on MTV's Daria) isn't entirely sympathetic.

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Gabriel Macht

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