Fred Williamson

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Fred Williamson - Variety's Creative Impact Awards And 10 Directors To Watch Brunch at The 27th Annual Palm Springs International Film Festival - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 3rd January 2016

Fred Williamson
Fred Williamson

Fred Williamson - Variety's Creative Impact Awards and 10 Directors To Watch Brunch at the Parker Palm Springs hotel - Arrivals at Parker Hotel - Palm Springs, California, United States - Sunday 3rd January 2016

Fred Williamson
Fred Williamson

Fred Williamson, Tom Savini, Robert Rodriguez, Greg Nicotero and Danny Trejo - 2014 Texas Film Hall of Fame Awards held at Austin Studios - Arrivals - Austin, Texas, United States - Thursday 6th March 2014

Fred Williamson, Tom Savini, Robert Rodriguez, Greg Nicotero and Danny Trejo
Fred Williamson

Fred Williamson - 23rd Annual Night Of 100 Stars Black Tie Dinner Viewing Gala at the Beverly Hills Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 24th February 2013

Fred Williamson

Antonio Fargas and Fred Williamson - Antonio Fargas, Fred Williamson, Peter Parros Friday 18th May 2012 Knight Rider Festival 2012 at Fremont Street Experience

Antonio Fargas and Fred Williamson
Antonio Fargas
Antonio Fargas
Antonio Fargas
Antonio Fargas
Antonio Fargas

Vegas Vampires Review


Bad
After the sun sets in Las Vegas, vampires spring to life. They search for innocent (if anyone can be classified as innocent in sin city) casino and nightclub patrons to devour with their fangs. Head Vampire Q (Alex Wilkinson) is out for more than just blood, however; he's on a mission to find a beautiful bride with whom he can breed generations of vampires and continue his reign.

Meanwhile, the Vegas police department is searching for the killer behind a series of slayings in the city's most popular nightclubs. Conflicts emerge between Officer Johnson (Tommy "Tiny" Lister), Officer Patterson (Glenn Plummer), and head detective Burns (Daniel Baldwin) who want to suppress the truth that vampires are taking over the city. Soon, Patterson is found dead... victim of a bite to the neck. Johnson is left to crack the case alone, and must do so before Q succeeds in finding a bride.

Continue reading: Vegas Vampires Review

Street Poet Review


Bad
There was something about Street Poet, after popping the screener into my DVD player, that made me not do what my instinct compelled me to do: To shut the thing off after 10 minutes.

Maybe it was the bizarre promise of a movie starring both Fred Willard and C. Thomas Howell. Maybe it was the cheeseball title. Maybe it was the very premise.

Continue reading: Street Poet Review

M*A*S*H Review


Extraordinary
As its opening song tells us, suicide may be painless, but war doesn't look all that bad, either, not the way the storied M*A*S*H tells it.

M*A*S*H isn't just the most successful translation from film to TV show of all time, it's also a masterful movie in its own rite. Maybe Robert Altman's best work (and his first movie of any serious note), though he's barely associated with the film in the popular consciousness now.

Continue reading: M*A*S*H Review

Starsky & Hutch Review


Excellent
How gratifying to laugh at a movie starring Ben Stiller again. Not just occasional chuckles, as in Duplex or Along Came Polly, but big, genuine, generous laughs. A solid, well-timed comedy can be such a relief; Starsky & Hutch is no more than that, but that's part of its charm.

This charm may not be entirely expected. After all, it is (1) an adaptation of a 1970s cop show, (2) arriving maybe a decade after the peak of seventies nostalgia, (3) assembled by director-writer Todd Phillips (Road Trip, Old School), whose previous movies were only funny to the extent that the actors could overcome his aimless, slapdash staging (Will Ferrell, no problem; Breckin Meyer, less so).

Continue reading: Starsky & Hutch Review

The Independent Review


Very Good
Mockumentary about the movie business? Okay, not original in any sense of the word, but putting Janeane Garofalo in a suit and spray-on tan is simply inspired.

The Independent is Jerry Stiller's show, starring him as Morty Fineman, a Roger Corman/Andy Sidaris-style filmmaker who makes lovingly crafted low-budget, borderline-exploitation films that the world largely dismisses as junk. The film follows Morty and daughter Paloma (Garofalo) as they try to revive Morty's sagging career and reflect on decades of schlocky work like Brothers Divided (about Siamese twins in Vietnam) and Foxy Chocolate Robot (about a foxy chocolate robot). The film uses present-day footage intercut with scenes ostensibly from Morty's body of work, all appropriate in graininess, streaks, and rotten acting quality. Real-world directors like Roger Corman and Ron Howard appear to offer commentary on Morty's oeuvre, all of whom declare him an underrated genius.

Continue reading: The Independent Review

The Independent Review


OK

Remember that great Z-grade 1969 protest picture "Brothers Divided," about the conjoined twins drafted to serve in Vietnam?

No? How about the blaxploitation classics "Venus De Mofo" and "The Foxy Chocolate Robot?" Or the tree-hugging girlie biker flick "The Eco-Angels"? Or the midget Gidget movie "Teenie Weenie Bikini Beach"?

Those don't ring a bell? Surely you've seen at least one of the 427 movies directed by schlock filmmaker Morty Fineman over the last 38 years, right?

Continue reading: The Independent Review

Starsky & Hutch Review


Bad

Owen Wilson has a smarmy-cool, utterly natural screen persona of wicked, crooked smiles, cheeky ad-libs and ironically understated wisecracks. He never strays far from this trademarked character, but no matter who he's playing -- petty criminal ("The Big Bounce"), crooked cowboy ("Shanghai Noon"), severely dysfunctional pop novelist ("The Royal Tenenbaums") -- he seems like a guy it would be fun to hang out with.

Ben Stiller, on the other hand, has fallen into a terrible rut as an insufferable prat. Whether he's a caricature of a romantic failure ("Along Came Polly"), a caricature of a dim-bulb fashion model ("Zoolander") or a caricature of a nervous son-in-law ("Meet the Parents"), he never strays far from the same brand of off-putting, uptight dorkiness masked in mock-cool-guy pouts and tedious moments of deliberately cheesy slow-motion (say, while dancing like a dork, strutting like a dork or running like a dork). He seems like a guy you wouldn't want to spend two minutes with if you could at all help it.

Wilson has been a breath of scene-stealing fresh air in several Stiller vehicles (especially in "Zoolander" and "Meet the Parents"), but their yin-and-yang routine hits a wall in "Starsky and Hutch," a lifelessly stale parody-remake of the none-too-great-in-the-first-place 1970s cop show.

Continue reading: Starsky & Hutch Review

Fred Williamson

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Starsky & Hutch Movie Review

Starsky & Hutch Movie Review

How gratifying to laugh at a movie starring Ben Stiller again. Not just occasional chuckles,...

The Independent Movie Review

The Independent Movie Review

Mockumentary about the movie business? Okay, not original in any sense of the word, but...

The Independent Movie Review

The Independent Movie Review

Remember that great Z-grade 1969 protest picture "Brothers Divided," about the conjoined twins drafted to...

Starsky & Hutch Movie Review

Starsky & Hutch Movie Review

Owen Wilson has a smarmy-cool, utterly natural screen persona of wicked, crooked smiles, cheeky ad-libs...

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