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Tio Papi Photocall

Joey Dedio, Frankie Faison, Fatima Ptacek, Gabriella Fanuele, David Castro and Kelly McGillis - Cast members of the film 'Tio Papi' attend a photocall at Planet Hollywood Times Square - New York City, NY, United States - Friday 19th July 2013

Joey Dedio, Frankie Faison, Fatima Ptacek, Gabriella Fanuele and David Castro
Joey Dedio, Frankie Faison, Fatima Ptacek, Gabriella Fanuele, David Castro and Priscilla Lopez
Fatima Ptacek
Fatima Ptacek
Joey Dedio, Frankie Faison, Fatima Ptacek, Gabriella Fanuele, David Castro and Kelly McGillis

Picture - Frankie Faison New York City, USA, Wednesday 28th September 2011

Frankie Faison Wednesday 28th September 2011 Press conference announcing Signature Theatre Company’s full programming for their first season at their new home at 480 West 42nd Street. New York City, USA

Picture - Keith Randolph Smith and Frankie... New York City, USA, Wednesday 28th September 2011

Frankie Faison - Keith Randolph Smith and Frankie Faison New York City, USA - Press conference announcing Signature Theatre Company’s full programming for their first season at their new home at 480 West 42nd Street. Wednesday 28th September 2011

Cirque Du Freak: The Vampire's Assistant Review


Weak
Based on the books by Darren Shan, this film is an introduction to a franchise, with the coloned title and preparatory storyline. It has a lively, engaging plot that keeps us engaged, even if it is yet another vampire romp.

Darren (Massoglia) is an A-student 16-year-old whose best pal Steve (Hutcherson) keeps getting him into trouble. When they hear about the underground Cirque du Freak, they can't resist a visit. There they meet ringmaster Mr Tall (Watanabe), bearded seer Truska (Hayek) a snake boy (Fugit), monkey girl (Carlson) and many more. But soon they're entangled with the show's star, vampire Crepsley (Reilly), and his mortal enemy Mr Tiny (Cerveris). And when Crepsley makes Darren a vampire, Steve gets so jealous that he joins the other side.

Continue reading: Cirque Du Freak: The Vampire's Assistant Review

Adam Review


Grim
Quirky and cute almost to the point of distraction, the offbeat romance is only rescued by its likeable cast and an intriguing storyline. But the writer-director overstates everything, and encourages his actors to do the same.

Adam (Dancy) lives in a Manhattan flat on his own after the death of his father. He has Asperger syndrome, working as a toy company microchip developer and pretty hopeless at relationships. Then Beth (Byrne) moves into his building, and they strike up a friendship that leads to romance. She's attracted to his honesty, although her parents (Gallagher and Irving) aren't so sure. And the events that follow in both Adam's and Beth's lives put a heavy strain on their relationship.

Continue reading: Adam Review

My Blueberry Nights Review


Good
It's always a tightrope when foreign filmmakers, particularly those from the Hong Kong market, come to American shores to ply their trade. Though it doesn't appear that Wong Kar Wai is going to be setting up shop permanently in Hollywood (nobody's going to be after him to direct the next Die Hard installment), My Blueberry Nights marks his first English-language film, with an entirely American and British cast. It shows that the director is not just a foreign-language specialty, his gifts are quite apparent even when the veil of mystery is lifted for English-speaking audiences once the subtitles are gone. However, My Blueberry Nights also shows that for all Wong's rightly vaunted abilities and passionate sense of cinema, there are some glaringly obvious rough patches in his approach, brought into sharp relief by transplanting the action from the teeming streets of Hong Kong to the wide open spaces of America, where his instincts for actors seem less sure.

An odd road movie of sorts that spends most of its time hanging around in diners, bars, and casinos (and precious little of it on the road), My Blueberry Nights will be noted in many quarters for it being the feature film-acting debut of jazz chanteuse Norah Jones. To put it briefly: No actress is she. Playing a lovelorn young woman named Elizabeth, she first shows up in a Brooklyn diner run by Jeremy, a charming Manchester immigrant played with the expected lighthearted dash by Jude Law. In the middle of a breakup, Elizabeth moons about the café, eating the excellent pie (best in the city!) and chatting with Jeremy, winning his heart even as hers is breaking over somebody else. Then Elizabeth ups and skips out, landing next in Memphis, where she waitresses at a café and a bar, telling everyone she's working two jobs to save up for a car.

Continue reading: My Blueberry Nights Review

Picture - Frankie Faison Hollywood, California, Thursday 13th March 2008

Frankie Faison and Tyler Perry Thursday 13th March 2008 World Premiere of Tyler Perry's 'Meet the Browns' - Arrivals Hollywood, California

Frankie Faison and TYLER PERRY
Frankie Faison and TYLER PERRY

Picture - Frankie Faison New York City, USA, Thursday 24th January 2008

Frankie Faison Thursday 24th January 2008 Opening night performance of Come Back, Little Sheba at the Biltmore Theatre - Arrivals New York City, USA

The Silence of the Lambs Review


Extraordinary
Is it a modern masterpiece? Did it deserve to sweep the four big Academy Awards? Is it one of the best thrillers ever made? A definitive maybe to all three questions. The Silence of the Lambs is definitely an experience that gets better and better each time you watch it, and it paved the way for some of the greatest sickos of 1990s cinema. Hopkins' Hannibal Lecter has entered the annals of pop culture and will never be forgotten, but it's really Jodie Foster's frail-yet-foolhardy protagonist that carries the film.

Continue reading: The Silence of the Lambs Review

Cat People (1982) Review


OK
I've never seen the original 1942 Cat People (I have now -Ed.), but I have a hard time imagining it bears much resemblance to this 1982 remake, courtesy of director Paul Schrader (American Gigolo), writer Alan Ormsby (who wrote Porky's II and four of the Substitute movies), and stars Nastassja Kinski and Malcolm McDowell.

Bizarre from frame one, the story tells of an ancient race of werewolf-like cat people, doomed to turn into black leopards (is that the same thing as a panther?) if they mate with humans. The only way to maintain human form, they say, is to mate with another cat person -- or, apparently, to devour a human in a lusty rage.

Continue reading: Cat People (1982) Review

White Chicks Review


Unbearable
No one does sick bathroom slapstick better than the Wayans brothers - their work on Scary Movie and Scary Movie 2 proves that. They curiously didn't return for the third movie in that franchise. Maybe they realized (or someone did for them) that their brand of humor had run its useful course and it was time to move on. White Chicks is the product of their departure. Unfortunately, it's far from original, or entertaining - in fact, it takes the Wayans' brand of gross-out humor to a whole new low.

Two FBI agents, Marcus (Marlon Wayans) and Kevin Copeland (Shawn Wayans) have a knack for screwing up their assignments. Their supervisor (Frankie Faison) is pissed, and the pair have become the joke of the department. After blowing their cover on their last assignment, Marcus and Kevin are given "one final" opportunity to prove themselves. They're assigned to escort high profile, cruise ship heiresses Brittany and Tiffany Wilson (think Paris and Nicky Hilton) to a party in the Hamptons without getting kidnapped. I guess shipboard credits and shore excursions are hot commodities for East Coast socialites.

Continue reading: White Chicks Review

The Silence of the Lambs Review


Extraordinary
Is it a modern masterpiece? Did it deserve to sweep the four big Academy Awards? Is it one of the best thrillers ever made? A definitive maybe to all three questions. The Silence of the Lambs is definitely an experience that gets better and better each time you watch it, and it paved the way for some of the greatest sickos of 1990s cinema. Hopkins' Hannibal Lecter has entered the annals of pop culture and will never be forgotten, but it's really Jodie Foster's frail-yet-foolhardy protagonist that carries the film.

Continue reading: The Silence of the Lambs Review

Red Dragon Review


Good
Red Dragon has just about everything going against it.

It's the third movie in a series that won an insane number of Oscars (The Silence of the Lambs) and was promptly followed by one of the worst films in recent memory (Hannibal). It's a prequel... and its big star (Anthony Hopkins) is about 20 years too old. And it's a remake of a minor cult classic (Manhunter), a fantastic film which will invariably stomp the crap out of Red Dragon in the history books.

Continue reading: Red Dragon Review

The Thomas Crown Affair (1999) Review


Excellent
Ah, the perils of being a billionaire these days. Million dollar mergers, on-site tailors, gourmet meals every night... and the thrill of stealing priceless works of art just to see if you can get away with it.

If you can relate to this heady premise, you'll love The Thomas Crown Affair. A loose remake of the 1968 Thomas Crown Affair, this version pits Pierce Brosnan and Rene Russo against each other in a game of cat-and-cat. Brosnan is Thomas Crown, an uber-wealthy NYC tycoon with an art fetish. Russo is Catherine Banning, a semi-rogue insurance investigator who instantly pegs Crown as the thief when the local Monet goes missing.

Continue reading: The Thomas Crown Affair (1999) Review

Down To Earth Review


Terrible
There are times when a remake feels more like a ripoff. The Chris Rock comedy Down to Earth is a perfect example. Based on... no, xeroxed from 1978's Heaven Can Wait, it's a string of dull fish-out-of-water scenes held together by someone else's script.

The "someone else", in this case, are Elaine May and Warren Beatty, screenwriters of that earlier romantic comedy, which itself was a remake of 1941's Here Comes Mr. Jordan. But Beatty and May crafted a fresh story with a modern update and some sex appeal, while paying homage to the old version. Down to Earth is just a much weaker version of the same movie.

Continue reading: Down To Earth Review

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