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Frost/Nixon Trailer


Watch the trailer for Frost/Nixon

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Frank Langella Friday 23rd January 2009 The 20th Annual Producers Guild Awards held at the Hollywood Palladium - Arrivals Los Angeles, California

Frank Langella

Frank Langella Saturday 24th January 2009 20th Annual Producers Guild Awards held at The Hollywood Palladium Hollywood,California

Frank Langella
Frank Langella

Frank Langella - Thursday 8th January 2009 at Critics' Choice Awards Santa Monica, California

Frank Langella
Angela Bassett and Frank Langella
Angela Bassett and Frank Langella
Frank Langella

Frank Langella and Ron Howard - Frank Langella and Ron Howard Palm Springs, California - attends the 2009 Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards Gala held at the Convention Center Tuesday 6th January 2009

Frank Langella and Ron Howard
Frank Langella
Frank Langella and Ron Howard
Frank Langella and Ron Howard
Frank Langella and Ron Howard
Frank Langella and Ron Howard

Frost/Nixon Review


Essential
If there's a single misstep in Ron Howard's expertly calibrated Frost/Nixon, it eluded me.

Howard's spellbinding adaptation of Peter Morgan's Tony-nominated stage drama understands the politics that manipulate Washington and Hollywood. It comprehends how many interviews are won and lost long before the Q&A begins. It figures out the best way to transition an airtight theatrical production to the roomier silver screen (giving the elements plenty of room to breathe). And -- most importantly -- it illustrates the intimidating power of television, which creates and destroys legacies on a daily basis.

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Frank Langella - Monday 17th November 2008 at Ziegfeld Theatre New York City, USA

Frank Langella
Frank Langella

Frank Langella - Wednesday 15th October 2008 at Odeon Leicester Square London, England

Frank Langella
Frank Langella
Frank Langella

Frank Langella Wednesday 15th October 2008 The Times BFI London Film Festival - Premiere of Frost/Nixon - Arrivals London, England

Frank Langella
Frank Langella

Frank Langella Tuesday 7th October 2008 'A Man For All Seasons' Broadway Opening Night held at the Roundabout Theatre Company's American Airlines Theatre New York City, USA

Frank Langella
Frank Langella
Frank Langella
Frank Langella
Frank Langella

Cynthia Nixon and Frank Langella - Cynthia Nixon and Chris Noth New York City, USA - Opening Night of 'Frank Langella - A Man For All Seasons' on Broadway at the American Airlines Theatre Tuesday 7th October 2008

Cynthia Nixon and Frank Langella
Cynthia Nixon and Frank Langella
Cynthia Nixon and Frank Langella
Cynthia Nixon and Frank Langella
Cynthia Nixon and Frank Langella
Cynthia Nixon and Frank Langella

Starting Out In The Evening Review


Extraordinary
Hollywood exaggerates the truth about many professions, but might be dead-on with its frequent depiction of novelists as tortured and frustrated human beings. After all, few careers share the morale-crushing nature of a novelist; even well-known writers can spend years on a book only to receive rejection and never see it published. Then there's deadline pressure. Leonard Schiller's deadline isn't from an agent or publisher, but rather pending death.

Starting Out in the Evening unveils the final chapter in the life of Schiller (Frank Langella), an aging novelist whose health deteriorates as he races to complete one last book. Since his existing novels are out of print, Leonard needs the next one be a success if he wants to be fondly remembered in the literary world. He's been working on the book for over a decade now, however, and has failed to capture interest from publishers. His shortcomings are not due to laziness, though. Leonard used to be a more prolific writer, but has never been the same since his wife died years prior, and neither has his work.

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Frank Langella - Sunday 10th June 2007 at Radio City Music Hall New York City, USA

Frank Langella
Frank Langella

Frank Langella - Wednesday 16th May 2007 at Tony Awards New York City, USA

Frank Langella
Frank Langella

Superman Returns Review


Very Good

You are bound to leave Superman Returns buzzing about "the scene." It's our first real glimpse in the film of the Man of Steel in action, the first genuine indication that the spandex-clad savior has, indeed, returned.

Here's setting for the scene: Intrepid Daily Planet reporter Lois Lane (Kate Bosworth), now a Pulitzer Prize winner, is covering a groundbreaking, mid-air shuttle launch. The spacecraft is poised to detach from a jumbo jet miles over the East coast and continue its jaunt through the stratosphere. But a massive power outage caused by Lex Luthor (Kevin Spacey) prevents a smooth transition, so Superman (newcomer Brandon Routh) must quickly separate the speeding crafts, catapult the rocket through the stars, then rush back to earth to catch the now-burning airliner before it lands on the pitcher's mound of a populated baseball diamond.

Continue reading: Superman Returns Review

I'm Losing You Review


Good
This multi-storied film centers around Langella, dying of cancer, and how his imminent death (and the death of others) impacts the rest of the cast. Throw in another three or four soon-to-be-six-feet-unders (the most memorable and surprising being Elizabeth Perkins as a woman slowly dying of AIDS) and you've got yourself one hell of a depressing movie. Even those who aren't dying are obsessed with it (McCarthy hawks "death futures" -- reselling life insurance policies for dying people). Even if you're perfectly healthy, you'll probably start checking for lumps after this one.

Broadway: The Golden Age, By The Legends Who Were There Review


Good
Self-indulgent to a fault and brusquely shoved together without much of a sense of rhythm, Broadway: The Golden Age is on the surface the five-year-long quest by filmmaker Rick McKay (Elaine Stritch at Liberty) to interview pretty much every Broadway luminary he could get his hands on, all for the purposes of limning the glory that was Broadway's "Golden Age." Now it's no surprise that you interview a bunch of aging actors/actresses who are in this particular demographic they're going to tell you that things today are rather awful, and in their day, were much, much better. What makes Broadway as engaging as it is would be the fact that McKay's interviewees are able to back up those claims with some rather illuminating anecdotes - and not just all of the "you could go to the automat and get a muffin and coffee for 15 cents" variety, though there's plenty of that as well.

Although McKay - whose irritating narration, the usual guff about moving to New York from Indiana and just how exciting it all was, brackets the film - never really posits what exactly he's on about with "The Golden Age," two things quickly become clear: The time period he and his subjects want to talk about is Broadway theater from the 1930s to the 1950s, and that period really would have been something to behold. The cavalcade of interviewees all point to not just the embarrassment of riches that were around then in terms of both the material (Lerner & Lowe and Rodgers & Hammerstein were like musical hit factories, not to mention the new dramatic work being produced by the likes of Tennessee Williams and Arthur Miller) and the talent, but another very simple factor: It was cheap. In a time of $480 The Producers tickets, it's partially nice but mostly infuriating to know that not so long ago it could cost less to go to a Broadway show than the movies.

Continue reading: Broadway: The Golden Age, By The Legends Who Were There Review

Good Night, And Good Luck Review


Excellent
One doesn't need much more of a reason to go to the movies than this: Edward R. Murrow taking on Senator Joe McCarthy (at the height of his power), crisp black-and-white cinematography, the clink of ice cubes over scotch, voluptuous clouds of cigarette smoke hanging in the air, a nation's conscience dangling in the balance. So it is with George Clooney's Good Night, and Good Luck, a film where the mood - just shy of too cool for its own good - sets the scene for Murrow, the patron saint of journalism, to cajole and castigate the audience in a time of complacency. It also has a great jazz soundtrack.

The story of the witch-hunt has endlessly retold, usually laden with the same self-satisfied 20/20 hindsight that afflicts stories of the civil rights movement, and fortunately Clooney and co-writer Grant Heslov see no need to go through it all again. With admirable precision, they've sliced away most all the accoutrements often used to open up the era for the modern viewer, ala Quiz Show. This is a film that takes place almost entirely inside a CBS studio and newsroom, with occasional trips to hallways, elevators, and a network executive's wood-paneled office. Once, they all go out to a bar. It's best in the studio, because that's where we find Murrow - incarnated with almost indecent accuracy by David Strathairn - looking and sounding like as though Rod Serling had decided to rejoin the human race, his manner clipped and astringent, cigarette cocked in one hand like a talisman warding off evil.

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Cutthroat Island Review


Bad
Before there was Waterworld, there was Cutthroat Island, an overwrought period pirate movie that cost $92 million to make and earned about $12 million in the theaters. Put simply, this is The Goonies with grown-ups. Only the grown-ups should be embarrassed.

Stardom Review


Weak
Nothing could better use a solid send-up than the beyond egomaniacal fashion model "industry," a self-obsessed, navel-gazing enterprise of nonsensical characters if ever there has been one. French Canadian director Denys Arcand (best known for Jesus of Montreal) has created some biting social commentaries in the past, but Stardom is far from a masterpiece.

Stardom tells the story of an unknown female hockey player named Tina (Jessica Paré) who finds celebrity in the modeling biz when a happenstance candid photo of her on the ice becomes all the rage. Soon enough she's an up-and-comer in Montreal, jetting off to Europe for photo shoots and parties, and indulging in the usual trappings of the supermodel race.

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The Ninth Gate Review


Very Good
What is The Ninth Gate? Judging from the cryptic marketing campaign, you might be likely to dismiss it as another ridiculous action movie, with big fireballs and car chase scenes. Or worse, maybe you'll shun it as a metaphysical adventure -- yet another End of Days.

Fortunately, The Ninth Gate is neither of these. In actuality, it's a mystery with Johnny Depp as the unlikely hero, Frank Langella as the perfectly-cast antagonist, and Lena Olin and Emmanuelle Seigner as the femmes fatale. Under the direction of Roman Polanski, you can rest assured that these characters get mixed up quite a bit en route through a serpentine plot that is far more interesting than its subject matter would imply: The search for a couple of rare books.

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House Of D Review


Good
How much Robin Williams can we take? A week before his new film, House of D, previewed in Boston, Williams appeared on Real Time with Bill Maher on Friday, at the Independent Spirit Awards on Saturday (where he tactfully walked offstage because he could not shut the hell up), and at the Oscars on Sunday. Add in his shtick from the unavoidable onslaught of Robots TV commercials, and this guy gets more airtime than a Martha Stewart prison release.

It's a testament then to Williams's fine acting, and debut writer-director David Duchovny, that the motor-mouth's co-starring turn in House of D isn't a turn-off. Far from it. Williams and 15-year-old Anton Yelchin (Hearts in Atlantis) make up the unlikely duo in this coming-of-age drama about the friendship between Pappass, a mentally retarded janitor (Williams), and Tommy, a single-parent teen (Yelchin) in 1973 Greenwich Village. Williams displays, as he does in most of his dramatic films, a welcome appropriateness, a delivery of action and reaction that helps give House of D a good heart and some laugh-out-loud nuggets of wisdom.

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Lolita (1997) Review


Weak
A kind-of crummy remake of Kubrick's classic, this Lolita has are young heroine as a real slut. Who wouldn't want a piece of that? Avoid and go for the original.

Junior Review


OK
I've seen better movies, but I've certainly seen worse. If the idea of Arnold Schwarzengger gone preggers sounds like fun to you, well, you'll love Junior. Teamed up with Danny DeVito, his diminutive Twins costar, this baby isn't the product of some sick coupling between the Austrian and the shrimp -- rather, it's a freak scientific experiment, with Thompson's stolen egg implanted in Arnie's belly. Umbilical cord, you ask? Quiet, or Arnie will punch you in the face!!!

Eddie Review


OK
Whoopi Goldberg becomes the coach of the Knicks in this silly and utterly harmless sports comedy. Too bad it just isn't funny -- can anyone figure out why Goldberg was ever considered a comedian? -- as the line "And you're not a player -- lookin' like a little roach!" gets the biggest, yet least explicable, laughs.

Sweet November Review


Good

"Sweet November" may be a work of romantic hokum about a savage power-yuppie who learns to slow down and discover love in the arms of a quirky, perky girl with a tragic secret -- but as such sappy movies go, this is one that hits all the right notes.

Keanu Reeves and Charlize Theron proved they have couples chemistry as husband and wife in "The Devil's Advocate." Here they do the opposites-attract thing with great success and use their charisma to overcome what by all rights should be a script full of romantic clichés.

Reeves plays shallow, ruthless, arrogant ad industry hotshot Nelson Moss, who shows his astronomical self-centeredness in the picture's opening scene. It's early morning and he's having sex with his girlfriend -- until his alarm clock goes off. The second it does, he says "thanks, that was great" before jumping up, walking across his uber-modern high-rent loft, turning on his entire wall of high-tech TVs and brainstorming an ad campaign for a major client.

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Stardom Review


Unbearable

The rise-and-fall of a fictional supermodel is the topic of "Stardom," an irritatingly over-conceptualized yet blandly under-realized documentary-style satire-drama.

Narrated to death by a parade of invariably obnoxious hairdressers, photographers, agents, talk show hosts and Much Music VJs (it takes place in Canada), it's the story of an 18-year-old knockout brunette (newcomer Jessica Paré) spotted by a sports photographer while playing hockey and rapidly whisked into a pampered, jet-setting lifestyle.

Half mocumentary and half an insincere, tisk-tisk condemnation of beauty as a commodity and a social currency, the picture is a ripe idea corrupted by its own self-satisfaction and made worthless by the fact that the girl at its axis is wildly uninteresting.

Continue reading: Stardom Review

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Frank Langella Movies

Captain Fantastic Movie Review

Captain Fantastic Movie Review

An offbeat comedy-drama with a timely kick, this charming family road trip takes on some...

Captain Fantastic- Teaser Trailer

Captain Fantastic- Teaser Trailer

Devoted father Ben (Viggo Mortensen) has been raising his six children in the forests of...

5 To 7 Trailer

5 To 7 Trailer

Arielle and Valéry don't exactly have a conventional marriage, they're happy enough and have two...

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Draft Day Movie Review

Draft Day Movie Review

Essentially this year's Moneyball, but set in American football rather than baseball, this fast-paced drama...

Grace of Monaco Movie Review

Grace of Monaco Movie Review

While the tone is all wrong, this fantastical version of a momentous year in the...

Grace of Monaco Trailer

Grace of Monaco Trailer

Grace Kelly is one of the most famous and most beloved Hollywood actresses in the...

Muppets Most Wanted Trailer

Muppets Most Wanted Trailer

Kermit and friends are set to go international with the help of their unfortunately named...

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Draft Day Trailer

Draft Day Trailer

Sonny Weaver, Jr. is the general manager of National Football League team the Cleveland Browns...

The Muppets Most Wanted Trailer

The Muppets Most Wanted Trailer

Kermit and friends return, embarking on an extensive world tour that sees them reach all...

Grace Of Monaco Trailer

Grace Of Monaco Trailer

Grace Kelly is one of the most loved women of the past 100 years. The...

The Muppets Most Wanted Trailer

The Muppets Most Wanted Trailer

Kermit the Frog, Miss Piggy, Animal and friends are up to their usual tricks as...

Robot & Frank Movie Review

Robot & Frank Movie Review

A warm drama that drifts into light, goofy comedy, this film is too slight to...

Robot & Frank Trailer

Robot & Frank Trailer

Frank is former burglar suffering from increasingly worsening dementia. His lawyer son Hunter notices his...

Unknown Movie Review

Unknown Movie Review

With a Hitchcockian mistaken-identity plot, this film can't help but draw us into its slickly...

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