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Frances O'Connor - 2016 Los Angeles Film Festival 'The Conjuring 2' premiere at TCL Chinese Theatre IMAX - Arrivals at TCL Chinese Theater IMAX, Los Angeles Film Festival - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 7th June 2016

Frances O'connor
Frances O'connor
Frances O'connor

Frances O'Connor - A host of stars were photographed as they took to the red carpet at the 72nd Annual Golden Globe Awards which were held at The Beverly Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 11th January 2015

Frances O'connor
Frances O'connor

Frances O'Connor - A host of stars were snapped as they attended the British Academy of Film and Television Awards (BAFTA) Los Angeles Tea Party which were held at The Four Seasons Hotel in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 10th January 2015

Frances O'connor
Frances O'connor
Frances O'connor
Frances O'connor

Frances O'Connor - 'Great Britain' press night at Theatre Royal Haymarket - London, United Kingdom - Saturday 27th September 2014

Frances O'connor
Frances O'connor

Frances O'Connor - The opening of the National Theatre's production of Great Britain at the Theatre Royal Haymarket - Arrivals at Theatre Royal, Haymarket, Theatre Royal Haymarket - London, United Kingdom - Friday 26th September 2014

Frances O'connor
Frances O'connor

Frances O'Connor - Opening Night of 'The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time' at the Gielgud Theatre, Shaftesbury Avenue, London - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 8th July 2014

Frances O'connor
Frances O'connor

Frances O'Connor and Guest - Cartier Polo Cup held at Guards Polo Club. - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 15th June 2014

Frances O'connor and Guest
Frances O'connor and Guest

Frances O'Connor Monday 26th September 2011 The Australian premiere of 'The Hunter' held at Dendy Cinemas Sydney, Australia

Frances O'connor
Frances O'connor
Frances O'connor
Frances O'connor
Frances O'connor
Frances O'connor

Frances O'Connor and Fox - Tuesday 29th January 2008 at Fox Studios New York City, USA

Frances O'connor and Fox
Frances O'connor and Fox
Frances O'connor and Fox

Timeline Review


Bad
At least one can be thankful for a movie like Timeline that hires Billy Connolly to play Paul Walker's father, but stops itself short of then asking Walker to do a Scottish accent; it's all the poor guy can do to emote anything besides a grinning, sun-blanched California geniality. In many other ways, the filmmakers have littered the screen with ideas that go from bad to worse, quite often taking lengthy detours into sheer laughability along the way. This was likely supposed to be a big summer-style actioner, with all the time travel and battling knights that the post-Dungeons and Dragons multiplex crowd could ever want, but it came out like a plus-size episode of Sliders.

The story is typical Michael Critchon hooey, only shorn of all the techno-speak which his books use to cloud the sheer implausibility of their central conceits. An archaeological group on a dig in France finds a couple of interesting artifacts: one is a modern-day bifocal lens, the other a note from the dig's leader, Prof. Ed Johnston (Connolly), which is in his handwriting but dates from the 14th century. Just as this is discovered, the gang (mostly young attractive archaeologists and Walker, who was just there visiting his dad) is all summoned back to the desert headquarters of ITC, the big firm that's funding their dig. There, ITC's boss (David Thewlis, long MIA from Hollywood films) says that they've discovered how to send people back in time through a freakily-discovered wormhole to a spot in France circa 1357, and oh yeah, that they sent Johnston back there a couple days ago, he hasn't returned and they're starting to get worried about him. You see, that particular part of the world was at that time embroiled in a battle between the French and the English, meaning that there were lots of angry men on horses riding about looking for people to practice one-sided swordplay on.

Continue reading: Timeline Review

A.I. Artificial Intelligence Review


Good
I remember sitting in a movie theater at the tender age of 14, watching a little film called D.A.R.Y.L., about a boy with a computer brain trying to cope with modern society and questions of emotion and identity. D.A.R.Y.L. was not some overblown, 2 1/2-hour ordeal. It was 99 breezy minutes of fun fun fun!

A.I. Artificial Intelligence is, too my deep dismay, neither breezy nor particularly fun. The level of anticipation of the film, of course, would be impossible to effectively sate, but A.I. just doesn't cut it. It doesn't even come close.

Continue reading: A.I. Artificial Intelligence Review

Book Of Love (2004) Review


Good
Wait: When you sleep with a teenager that could have an impact on your marriage?

Book of Love is strangely, simultaneously obvious and moving. Happy couple Elaine (Frances O'Connor) and David (Simon Baker) are getting along just fine, when for some reason they take an interest in 16-year-old Chet (Gregory Smith), who's a local swimmer and soda jerk at their favorite drug store. Chet is obviously smitten with Elaine, and it isn't long before one drunken night when she submits to his tentative advances.

Continue reading: Book Of Love (2004) Review

Piccadilly Jim Review


Weak
A rather hysterical oddity that can't decide what era it's set in or what mood to play, Piccadilly Jim just chucks it all at the screen and hopes that some wit will come through and generate some laughs. Fortunately for the audience, some of it does - unfortunately for the film, not nearly enough.

Based on P.G. Wodehouse's novel, the film concerns the exploits of one Jim Crocker (Sam Rockwell), a young wastrel whose social-climbing American mother (Allison Janney, sharp as a tack) has forced him and his father (Tom Wilkinson), a failed British actor, to live in London and try and impress the swells there. She does this just to tick off her competitive sister, Nesta (Brenda Blethyn), a fact not wasted on the men of the family. Spoiling his mother's plans is Jim's penchant to booze it up all over town, getting into fistfights and leaving flappers scattered about the house and in his bed. Jim decides to ostensibly reform his wayward ways when he meets Nesta's step-niece Anne (Frances O'Connor), who won't have anything to do with him unless he pretends to be someone else - Jim once wrote a gossip column under the name "Piccadilly Jim", and once someone else writing the column (he hasn't worked on it for years) gave a negative review to a collection of Anne's poems. Jim thusly does the only sensible thing a fellow could do: He pretends to be a teetotaler Christian named Algernon Bayliss. Somehow, along the way, a German spy and some scientific secrets come into play, but one would be well-served to not wonder how.

Continue reading: Piccadilly Jim Review

About Adam Review


Weak

Let's see if I can, without giving away too much, get to the crux of why "About Adam" self-destructs despite being quite entertaining and consistently amusing.

The movie is a buoyant but dark comedy about a conspicuously charming young grifter (Stuart Townsend, "Shooting Fish") who seduces an entire generation of one average suburban Irish family, carrying on torrid, secret affairs with all of them at the same time.

It's clever in that the same story is told in turn from each sibling's perspective and is brimming with glib wit in both dialogue and circumstance. But throughout the picture there are nagging little problems that foreshadow a 500-pound gorilla of a debacle that runs amok through the finale.

Continue reading: About Adam Review

Bedazzled Review


OK

It's easy to understand why Brendan Fraser wanted to star in "Bedazzled." He gets to play a Colombian drug lord, a half-witted hick version of Dennis Rodman and a whole series of other screwball characters -- all fantasy incarnations of Elliot Richards, a lonely doormat of a tech support geek who sells his soul to the devil.

For four years Elliot (Fraser) has admired from afar a comely co-worker named Alison (Frances O'Connor, "Mansfield Park"). Bumping into her in a bar after work one day, his already diminutive ego is squashed when she doesn't even know who he is. "God, I'd give anything to have that girl in my life," he whimpers under his breath.

God may not have heard him, but the next thing Elliot knows a slinky sexpot Satan (Elizabeth Hurley) in a micro-mini red dress appears and promises him seven wishes for his soul.

Continue reading: Bedazzled Review

A.I Artificial Intelligence Review


OK

No Steven Spielberg movie without dinosaurs or lost arks is complete until some part of it is slathered in schmaltz, and no Spielberg finale has ever been as thick with it as "A.I. Artificial Intelligence."

Of course, I can't go into detail without spoiling said finale, but just imagine something so soft-focused, saccharine and teary-eyed that E.T. himself would go into sugar shock -- then multiply that by 10 and you'll get the general idea.

As with most Spielberg films, the irony is that up until the Gatorade cooler of sappy sentimentality is dumped over the audience's collective head, "A.I." is an admirable cinematic feat -- a mesmerizing mix of cautionary futuristic fairy tale, prudently measured intentional corniness, and neon-colored three ring circus.

Continue reading: A.I Artificial Intelligence Review

The Importance Of Being Earnest Review


OK

Film director Oliver Parker is fond of controversial fiddling with established stage classics. In 1995 he reinvented William Shakespeare's "Othello" as a relationship-intensive, semi-erotic psychological thriller. In 1999 he took liberties with Oscar Wilde's "An Ideal Husband," adding scenes and whole subplots with amusing but contentious results.

"The Importance of Being Earnest" is Parker's second stab at going Wilde, and while he once again retains the playwright's savory wit, this time out his plot-tweaking attempts to break out of the drawing room are often distractingly blunt and obvious. Chase scenes, tattooed buttocks and flashbacks of an out-of-wedlock pregnancy -- all new elements dictated by Parker -- are hardly the caliber or the character of any Victorian writer, even one as droll and roguish as Oscar Wilde.

However, a talented cast with keen comic timing helps assuage many of the movie's misfires. Colin Firth ("Bridget Jones's Diary") is nebbish perfection as Jack Worthington, a mannerly turn-of-the-Century country gentleman who invents a wayward brother named Earnest as an excuse for frequent trips to London to sow wild oats. In town he adapts the name Earnest himself and romances the prim but rebellious and beautiful Gwendolen Fairfax (Frances O'Connor), whose stuffy, high society mother (Judi Dench) is resolutely disapproving of all her daughter's suitors.

Continue reading: The Importance Of Being Earnest Review

Frances O'connor

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Frances O'Connor Movies

The Conjuring 2 Movie Review

The Conjuring 2 Movie Review

Continuing on from the 2013 hit, this sequel blends fact and fiction to follow real-life...

The Conjuring 2 Trailer

The Conjuring 2 Trailer

Not fazed by their previous experiences, Lorraine and Ed Warren are still successful paranormal investigators...

The Hunter Movie Review

The Hunter Movie Review

Shot in the breathtaking wilds of Tasmania, this evocative dramatic thriller puts us into the...

Mansfield Park Movie Review

Mansfield Park Movie Review

What is it about Jane Austen? This box-office stalwart has inspired five major film...

About Adam Movie Review

About Adam Movie Review

So what about Adam, exactly? This Brit flick tells of a presumably dashing young...

Timeline Movie Review

Timeline Movie Review

At least one can be thankful for a movie like Timeline that hires Billy Connolly...

Bedazzled (2000) Movie Review

Bedazzled (2000) Movie Review

There truly is nothing quite like a Brendan Fraser movie, is there? Encino Man,...

Windtalkers Movie Review

Windtalkers Movie Review

Action is John Woo's middle name. After directing frenetic flicks such as Mission: Impossible...

A.I. Artificial Intelligence Movie Review

A.I. Artificial Intelligence Movie Review

I remember sitting in a movie theater at the tender age of 14, watching a...

Bedazzled Movie Review

Bedazzled Movie Review

It's easy to understand why Brendan Fraser wanted to star in "Bedazzled." He gets to...

About Adam Movie Review

About Adam Movie Review

Let's see if I can, without giving away too much, get to the crux of...

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