Frances Barber

Frances Barber

Frances Barber Quick Links

News Pictures Film RSS

The Pride - Press Night

Frances Barber - The Pride at Trafalgar Studios Whitehall - Press Night - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 13th August 2013

Frances Barber
Frances Barber
Frances Barber

Beautiful Thing - After Party

Frances Barber - Beautiful Thing Press Night After Party at Salvador and Amanda - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 17th April 2013

Frances Barber
Frances Barber

'The Book Of Mormon' Opening Night

Ruby Wax and Frances Barber - 'The Book of Mormon' Opening Night held at the Prince of Wales Theatre - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 21st March 2013

Ruby Wax and Frances Barber
Ruby Wax

Premiere Of 'The Revisionist' Held At The Cherry Lane Theatre

Frances Barber - Premiere of 'The Revisionist' held at the Cherry Lane Theatre - Arrivals - New York City, United States - Thursday 28th February 2013

Frances Barber
Frances Barber

May I Kill U? Review


OK

A pitch-black sense of humour provides some strong laughs in this satirical British thriller, but the undercooked script never manages to hold onto our interest. Packed with coincidences and contrivances, the story is just too sloppy, even if there's a provocative point worth making in here somewhere.

At the centre is bicycle cop Baz (Bishop), who patrols southeast London as opportunistic crime is on the rise. At one hot-spot, he corners a looter and, in exasperation, asks for permission to kill him. The guy says yes, and Baz posts a video of the event on the web, disguising himself as an anonymous vigilante hero who's cleaning up the streets. Then things start to get strange. After he rescues a group of trafficked women, one of them (Koleczek) comes home with him, which annoys his bitter mother (Barber). He also befriends an elderly woman (Leach), who leaves him her house when she dies. And her nephew Seth (Doolan) isn't happy about this.

The story is framed by scenes of Seth interrogating Baz in a basement, so we see his vigilante spree in episodic flashback, including his awkward relationship with his partner (Axe), who barely suspects a thing. At least this adds some structure to the randomness of the overall narrative, which pings all over the place without filling in plausible details. But this also makes it impossible for Bishop to build any chemistry with his costars, even though all four main actresses are feisty and engaging. So the film as a whole begins to drag badly, never bringing any sense of focus to the loosely offhanded filmmaking style.

Continue reading: May I Kill U? Review

Supper Club After Party Held At Cafe De Paris

Frances Barber and Cafe De Paris Tuesday 1st November 2011 Supper Club after party held at Cafe De Paris London, England

Frances Barber and Cafe De Paris
Frances Barber and Cafe De Paris

Evilenko Review


Grim
Why change the name of a real-life bad guy, A. R. Cikatilo, who killed and ate some 50 children in a Cold War-era U.S.S.R.? Why, so you can change it to Evilenko, which still sounds Russian but has the word "evil" in it. As played by Malcolm McDowell, the aging school teacher-cum-murderer is suitably, almost stereotypically, creepy, but the movie he's asked to buttress comes off as cold and irrelevant. The hotshot detective on the case isn't so much an investigator as a sleepwalker. More than anything, his lazy inquisition (and McDowell's banal defense: impotence) reminds us why communism didn't work out for the Russians.

Shiner Review


Unbearable
Not to be confused with dog-story Sounder, Shiner gives us Michael Caine, Martin Landau, and a pile of unknowns at their unbearable worst, in a story about a boxing promoter (Caine) who bets his life's savings on one of his son's fights, only for disaster to ensue.

Although Caine won an Oscar in 1999 for The Cider House Rules, there's a reason you didn't see his follow-up in this movie: because it's total crap. The acting is awful and the story is an insult. Director John Irvin has had better luck with "women's films" like Widow's Peak and A Month By the Lake, but unfortunately his action ends up more like Raw Deal.

Continue reading: Shiner Review

A Zed & Two Noughts Review


Grim
Peter Greenaway, with A Zed & Two Noughts, gives us what is undoubtedly the ultimate film with time-lapse shots of decomposing animals. Seeing them swell up with maggots and then explode, well, it's enough to make you want to go out for ice cream.

Lest you think I'm joking, consider Greenaway's body of work, which has included plenty of equally perverse nonsense. This time out he's giving us a story -- if you can call it that -- of a doctor whose wife dies in a freak car crash in front of the zoo (think about the title) where his twin brother is researching the aforementioned decaying of dead things. The distraught brothers end up in a love affair with a woman named Alba, who lost one leg in the car accident and later decides to lop off the other one for kicks.

Continue reading: A Zed & Two Noughts Review

Prick Up Your Ears Review


OK
You might not even recognize Gary Oldman and Alfred Molina in this little-seen movie about a little-known playright from the 1960s named Joe Orton. Living the high life of a swingin' '60s British homosexual, Orton (Oldman) becomes famous while his older partner Kenneth Halliwell (Molina) does not. Halliwell's reaction to this turn of events is particularly tragic for both. Directed by Stephen Frears, the film unfortunately spends far too much time on the minutiae of Orton's life and takes way too long to build to its inevitable, horrible conclusion.
Frances Barber

Frances Barber Quick Links

News Pictures Film RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.