X + Y

"Excellent"

X + Y Review


With a gentle current of comedy, this relaxed British drama finds some cleverly involving ways of approaching the concept of grief, specifically how various people need to deal with their inner pain in their own ways. It's a strikingly observant film that's also thoroughly engaging thanks to a terrific cast of actors who are given the space to develop their characters in organic ways we can easily identify with.

As a young boy, Nathan (Edward Baker-Close) folds into himself when his father (Martin McCann) is killed in a car crash. His optimistic mother Julie (Sally Hawkins) doesn't quite know how to deal with either his natural mathematical ability or his autistic inability to relate to people, but she does the best she can. And it's when he hits his teen years (now Asa Butterfield) that he begins to open up to his bristly tutor Humphreys (Rafe Spall), who encourages Nathan to travel to Taiwan to train with the British team for the International Mathematical Olympiad. In Taipei, Nathan has even more challenges as he learns to work with both the team coach Richard (Eddie Marsan) and his local study partner Mei (Jo Yang). And as Nathan begins to understand who he is, Julie also discovers that maybe she can cope after all.

Director Morgan Matthews and screenwriter James Graham have a remarkably light touch with the plot, allowing events to unfold naturally while never pushing the sentiment. They also thankfully figure out an inventive way to make a movie packed with mathematical formulae that actually feel meaningful to even the most maths-phobic member of the audience. Impressively, this lets the film get into Nathan's perspective to reveal how he sees the world and interacts with the people around him. And Butterfield plays the role with raw honesty that completely wins us over.

Watching Nathan relax his desperation for order in the world is actually thrilling, because it's obvious that he is both opening himself up to discovering his own life and adding to the experiences of people around him. Hawkins, Spall and Marsan offer terrific layers of emotion to each scene, creating likeable characters who are a bundle of contradictions. All of this helps the film explore some serious ideas without ever feeling like an issue-based movie. Yes, it's a story about an autistic maths nerd, but the journey he takes is so resonant that everyone in the audience will recognise exactly how he and his loved ones feel. So in the end, the film's hopefulness feels like an unexpected gift.


X + Y Trailer

 



X + Y

Facts and Figures

Genre: Dramas

Run time: 28 mins

In Theaters: Monday 16th February 2015

Production compaines: Original Pictures

Reviews

Contactmusic.com: 4 / 5

Cast & Crew

Director: Morgan Matthews

Producer: Laura Hastings-Smith, David M. Thompson

Starring: as Nathan, Alexandra Davies as Rebecca, as Richard, as Michael Ellis, Orion Lee as Deng Laoshi, Paul J. Dove as John, Percelle Ascott as Ben, as Humphreys (rumored), as Julie, Jo Yang as Zhang Mei

Contactmusic


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