Still Alice

"Extraordinary"

Still Alice Review


For a film about early onset Alzheimer's, this is a remarkably wry, honest and even hopeful drama, anchored by another staggeringly sensitive performance by Julianne Moore. Writing-directing team Richard Glatzer and Wash Westmoreland are known for their observant depictions of human interaction (see Quinceañera), and they fill the screen with sharp dialogue and earthy emotions that make this much more than another movie about a disease. Instead, it's about how people can transcend what life throws at them, even if it knocks them down.

Moore stars as Alice, a New York linguistics professor who has just turned 50 when she starts noticing that she's forgetting words and getting lost. Her doctor gives her the tough diagnosis, and she uses her dry wit and sharp intellect to face the future with her steady husband John (Alec Baldwin) and their three grown children: married and pregnant Anna (Kate Bosworth), aspiring actress Lydia (Kristen Stewart) and free-spirit Tom (Hunter Parrish). The hardest thing to learn is that the disease is familial, and that she has passed it to at least one of her children. So while she can, Alice makes a contingency plan for the future as she watches her family members each react in a different way.

No, this isn't a light and breezy movie. But the filmmakers balance the moments of gut-wrenching emotion with smart humour ("Sorry, I forgot - I have Alzheimer's!") and bracing honesty ("I wish I had cancer!"). Moore is uncannily raw in the role, subtly revealing Alice's transformation in ways we barely notice until we're reminded what she used to be like. Even more powerful is her own awareness of what's happening. Opposite her, Baldwin has terrific camaraderie and an unexpected warmth, while both Bosworth and Stewart get a chance to dig much deeper as actors than they usually do. And what makes the film special is the way Alice's interaction with each character is uniquely individualistic.

These kinds of layers take the audience on this odyssey right along with Alice. Gentle and relaxed, the film never overstates its themes, even as some of the emotional scenes are overwhelmingly moving. Alice's speech to the Alzheimer Association is notably powerful, highlighting both her own experiences and the way society at large is affected by dementia. Thankfully, the film is shot and edited in an airy way that never feels dark or claustrophobic. And by taking such an openhanded approach, Glatzer and Westmoreland remind us through Alice's experience that we need to live in the moment and never take anything for granted.

Still Alice Clip

 



Still Alice

Facts and Figures

Genre: Dramas

Run time: 101 mins

In Theaters: Friday 16th January 2015

Distributed by: Sony Pictures Classics

Production compaines: Killer Films, BSM Studio, Backup Media, Big Indie Pictures

Reviews

Contactmusic.com: 4.5 / 5

Rotten Tomatoes: 83%
Fresh: 35 Rotten: 7

IMDB: 7.5 / 10

Cast & Crew

Director: , Wash Westmoreland

Producer: Lex Lutzus, ,

Starring: as Lydia Howland, as Dr. Alice Howland, as Anna, as Tom Howland, as Dr. John Howland, Victoria Cartagena as Prof. Hooper, as Jenny, Shane McRae as Charlie, Stephen Kunken as Dr. Benjamin, Eha Urbsalu as Alice Howland's Mother, Cat Lynch as Pinkberry Worker

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