Steve Jobs

"Extraordinary"

Steve Jobs Review


Sidestepping arguments about accuracy, writer Aaron Sorkin and director Danny Boyle take an artistic, impressionistic approach to this biopic about the iconic Apple founder. Using a structure that would work perfectly on stage, the film tells his story through just three extended scenes. In the process, it reveals even more about human nature than it does about Steve Jobs or the tech business.

The first segment is set in 1984, as Steve (Michael Fassbender) is about to launch the game-changing Macintosh computer with cofounder Steve Wozniak (Seth Rogen), marketing expert Joanna Hoffman (Kate Winslet) and developer Andy Hertsfeld (Michael Stuhlbarg). As he organises the launch event to within an inch of its life, he's interrupted by his ex-girlfriend Chrisann (Katherine Waterston), but Steve still refuses to accept that her 5-year-old daughter is his. He also has an important conversation with the Apple chairman John Sculley (Jeff Daniels) just before going on-stage. This same scenario is repeated two more times, at the 1988 launch of NeXT and at the 1998 launch of the iMac, tracing Steve's fierce business acumen, complex interaction with his colleagues, and his evolving connection with his daughter.

Fassbender bravely never hedges his bets as Jobs, finding a tricky balance in an innovator who changed the world but never quite made sense of his personal or professional relationships. This is a man who is likeable and cruel at the same time, eliciting both laughter and gasps of horror from the audience. Fassbender's kinetic energy is hugely engaging, matched cleverly by Winslet's Hoffman, the only person with whom Jobs speaks about his own flaws. With both Rogen's generous Wozniak and Stuhlbarg's determined Hertzfeld, Jobs is much more dismissive, although there's respect under the surface. And its the literate banter with Daniels' thoughtful Sculley that gives the film its brainy kick, especially as it's so inventively written and directed to weave conversations right into flashbacks.

But the heart of the film lies in Jobs' complex interaction with his daughter (played by Makenzie Moss, Perla Haney-Jardine, then Ripley Sobo). These moments are both worrying and moving. They also give the film a layer of meaning beyond its subject matter, exploring the tricky nature of any relationship over such a long period of time. Boyle and Sorkin are both at the peak of their powers on this project, finding astonishing angles to the flawed characters that continually change the tone, pushing events forward while forcing the audience to think about the issues and feel the emotional kick. As a result, it becomes a breathtaking celebration of human imperfection.
Rich Cline

Watch the trailer for Steve Jobs here:



Steve Jobs

Facts and Figures

Genre: Dramas

Run time: 122 mins

In Theaters: Friday 23rd October 2015

Production compaines: Universal Pictures, Scott Rudin Productions, Legendary Pictures, The Mark Gordon Company, Management 360, Cloud Eight Films

Reviews

Contactmusic.com: 4.5 / 5

IMDB: 7.5 / 10

Cast & Crew

Director:

Starring: as Steve Jobs, as Joanna Hoffman, as Steve Wozniak, as Chrisann Brennan, as John Sculley, as Andy Hertzfeld, Makenzie Moss as Lisa Jobs (5 Years Old), as Andrea Cunningham, Adam Shapiro as Avie Tevanian, as Joel Pforzheimer, Perla Haney-Jardine as Lisa Jobs (19 Years Old), Steven Wiig as Bill Martin

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