Seven Samurai

"Essential"

Seven Samurai Review


There's probably no point heaping more praise on Seven Samurai after 52 years worth of critics have already done so, but what the hell, here's a little more love for the film.

Akira Kurosawa had about a decade of work -- nothing you've likely heard of -- under his belt by 1954, when he stormed the world with this masterpiece. 3 1/2 hours long, it's a western with a feudal 1600s Japanese sensibility, a format he'd return to frequently. But here it's at its simple best. Some may claim Seven Samurai is complex, but that's hardly truthful: It's about a village of farmers, who learn of an impending attack by bandits intent to rob them of their barley crop... again. They decide to fight back by recruiting seven samurai to teach them to fight, protect the village, and slay the bandits for good. Some will be heroes, some will perish. But we know all along that our samurai will win the day for the village somehow. And that's the gist.

Perhaps the most brilliant part of the film has nothing to do with its action scenes, pacing, script, or photography (all of which are top notch). It's the characters that stand out so memorably. Young Shino (Keiko Tsushima), who seems to be falling for one of the local farmgirls, jeopardizing the battle. The wise leader Shimada (Takashi Shimura). And of course the show-stealing Toshirô Mifune, playing an arrogant and uncontrollable ronin looking to outdo his compatriots and get as much glory as possible.

As the samurai interact and, eventually, do battle with the bandits, we get to know and understand them. And yet not a lot of dialogue is spent in Seven Samurai. Kurosawa is much more likely to let a panorama or some swordplay do the talking, as all good westerns should.

My only complaints are slight: That Samurai has some choppy parts in the beginning that could have been helpfully edited down, and the film's romantic subplot is difficult to fully understand without deep knowledge of 1600s Japanese courting customs. No biggies, really. You won't have time to care about it. The movie sucks you in so thoroughly you're actually pissed when you have to swap in a new disc during intermission. (Remember... 3 1/2 hours.)

Criterion has just reissued Samurai (spine number 2!) on a three-disc DVD set with a load of extras: two audio commentaries, a lengthy making-of featurette, a two-hour interview with Kurosawa, and a documentary about the samurai of the era. Plus you get all the usual stills, trailers, essays, and more, all bound up in a handsome package. Highly recommended.

Aka Shichinin no samurai.

One's missing.



Seven Samurai

Facts and Figures

Run time: 207 mins

In Theaters: Monday 19th November 1956

Box Office Worldwide: $269.1 thousand

Budget: $500 thousand

Distributed by: Columbia Pictures

Production compaines: Toho Company

Reviews

Contactmusic.com: 5 / 5

Rotten Tomatoes: 100%
Fresh: 57

IMDB: 8.7 / 10

Cast & Crew

Director:

Producer:

Starring: as Kikuchiyo, as Kambei Shimada, Yoshio Inaba as Gorobei Katayama, Seiji Miyaguchi as Kyuzo, Minoru Chiaki as Heihachi Hayashida, Daisuke Katô as Shichiroji, as Katsushiro Okamoto, Keiko Tsushima as Shino, Yukiko Shimazaki as Rikichi's Wife, as Manzô - Father of Shino, Yoshio Kosugi as Mosuke, Bokuzen Hidari as Yohei, as Rikichi, Kokuten Kôdô as Gisaku, the Old Man, Eijirô Tôno as Kidnapper, Jun Tatara as Coolie A, Atsushi Watanabe as Bun Seller, Toranosuke Ogawa as Grandfather of Kidnapped Girl, Isao Yamagata as Samurai, as Bandit Scout


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