My Baby's Daddy

"Terrible"

My Baby's Daddy Review


As I took that long, dark drive home from the multiplex after watching My Baby's Daddy, all I thought about was Raging Bull. Well, actually one scene, after boxer Jake LaMotta (Robert De Niro) has had the crap beaten out of him by Sugar Ray Robinson. As LaMotta, bruised and bleeding, exits the ring, he shouts to Robinson, "You didn't get me down, Ray!"

No quote better captures the excruciating experience of watching, or rather surviving, My Baby's Daddy. It's stupid and pointless. It's vulgar and crass without being remotely funny. It's racist and creepy, with a streak of sentimentality that's as genuine as a con man's handshake. It's full of more clichés than TV Land's primetime lineup. Writing a review is almost pointless, because anything I write will sound like a warning screamed from the rooftop.

This Miramax(!) comedy stars Eddie Griffin, Anthony Anderson, and Michael Imperioli as three lifelong buds from Philadelphia. They seem to have a blessed life, they're single, living free and throwing the best house parties around. However, their lives get turned upside down when their paramours announce that they're pregnant. The guys have to struggle with this new development and learn to become adults.

Of course, plenty of comedy has to ensure. Or, I'm sure that's what the four screenwriters, including Griffin, intended. That's right, four writers give us lame white rappers, elderly Chinese folks spouting hip hop lingo, flatulence aplenty, babies peeing, babies talking like a Teddy Pendergrass song, poor John Amos acting grumpy, five-year-olds acting like pimps, Eddie Griffin acting like a '70s pimp, Tiny Lister doing a lame Suge Knight routine, supposedly funny Chinese names (Bling-Bling, for example) and a birthing scene set to the rap classic "Push It."

All of this is hurled at the hapless audience, with the characters serving as soulless instruments to deliver the "jokes." Important characters, like the guys' girlfriends, float in and out when needed to drum up laughs or to have the guys prove they have a soft spot. There's no sense of this being a complete movie, but rather a bunch of extended, painful setups to try to deliver laughs and knowing smiles that never arrive. This is not only lazy writing and directing, but it's just plain patronizing to the audience.

People always complain that movie reviewers don't know how to "enjoy" a movie. But, as my colleague Jeremiah Kipp recently wrote, "It takes a brain to be entertained! You're actively involved when you laugh." Watch My Baby's Daddy and you'll see that no one bothers to engage the audience at that level. The result is no more engaging or provoking than watching a blank screen, which I recommend over paying money to see this.

Deleted scenes and outtakes enhance the film's DVD.

Lucky kid.



My Baby's Daddy

Facts and Figures

Run time: 86 mins

In Theaters: Friday 9th January 2004

Box Office USA: $17.2M

Box Office Worldwide: 51

Distributed by: Miramax Films

Reviews

Contactmusic.com: 1 / 5

Rotten Tomatoes: 4%
Fresh: 2 Rotten: 49

IMDB: 4.5 / 10

Cast & Crew

Director: Cheryl Dunye

Starring: as Lonnie, as G, as Dominic, as No Good (Randall), as Rolonda, as XiXi

Contactmusic


Links



Advertisement

New Movies

Get Back Movie Review

Get Back Movie Review

Roger Appleton's documentary 'Get Back' looks into the music scene that come out of Liverpool....

Imperium Movie Review

Imperium Movie Review

First-time filmmaker Daniel Ragussis takes an unusual approach to this thriller. Since it's based on...

The Girl With All the Gifts Movie Review

The Girl With All the Gifts Movie Review

Like a 10-years-later follow-up to 28 Days Later, this small British thriller takes a refreshingly...

The Magnificent Seven Movie Review

The Magnificent Seven Movie Review

Director Antoine Fuqua brings his usual fascination with violence to this remake of the iconic...

Bridget Jones's Baby Movie Review

Bridget Jones's Baby Movie Review

As it's been 12 years since the last Bridget Jones movie, expectations aren't too high...

The Beatles: Eight Days a Week - The Touring Years Movie Review

The Beatles: Eight Days a Week - The Touring Years Movie Review

A-list director Ron Howard worked with the surviving Beatles to assemble this engaging documentary, which...

Blair Witch Movie Review

Blair Witch Movie Review

It's been 17 years since The Blair Witch Project shook up the cinema and created...

Advertisement
Anthropoid Movie Review

Anthropoid Movie Review

Outside the Czech Republic, few people know about Operation Anthropoid, a spy mission in 1943...

Kubo and the Two Strings Movie Review

Kubo and the Two Strings Movie Review

From Laika (The Boxtrolls), this is one of the most beautiful, sophisticated animated films in...

Captain Fantastic Movie Review

Captain Fantastic Movie Review

An offbeat comedy-drama with a timely kick, this charming family road trip takes on some...

Hell or High Water Movie Review

Hell or High Water Movie Review

Sicario screenwriter Taylor Sheridan delivers another fiercely intelligent, engaging story that maintains high suspense while...

The 9th Life of Louis Drax Movie Review

The 9th Life of Louis Drax Movie Review

With heavy overtones of Hitchcockian mystery and intrigue, this stylish thriller is the enjoyably melodramatic...

Kickboxer: Vengeance Movie Review

Kickboxer: Vengeance Movie Review

The 1989 Muay Thai action movie Kickboxer starred a young Jean-Claude Van Damme, who pops...

Julieta Movie Review

Julieta Movie Review

Iconic Spanish filmmaker Pedro Almodovar is back with another powerfully complex female-centred drama, along the...

Advertisement
Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.