Mr Right

"Weak"

Mr Right Review


This is a shallow, superficial film about shallow, superficial people. It's nicely shot and features some strong performances, but as it tries to be both racy and moralistic, it won't satisfy many audiences.

Louise (Zaris) is a lively Londoner with a collection of gay pals. Her best mate is Alex (de Woolfson), a wannabe actor stuck in a catering job and a happy-but-wobbly relationship with TV producer Harry (Lance). William (Marshall) is an antiques expert with a petulant actor boyfriend, Lawrence (Ockenden), while wealthy artist Tom (Morris) shacks up with toyboy hunk Larrs (Hart). Naturally, Louise's new boyfriend Paul (Edwards) is nervous about meeting this sassy, snappy crowd. But if he's Mr Right, he'll have to live in Louise's world.

The key moment is when Paul has dinner with everyone, causing tremors in each relationship: Alex goes off to find himself, Lawrence snaps about how much time William spends with his sparky daughter (Planer), Larrs comes on to Harry. So the rest of the film is spent tying up the loose ends of all four rom-com storylines. And while each has moments of both big comedy and sharp emotion, they're played as silly farce, without much insight into the serious themes that are raised.

That's not necessarily a bad thing, although the film's slightly lurching plot and lack of focus on a single character's perspective keeps us from ever getting very involved. As does the fact that no one is terribly likeable. This isn't the fault of the lively and very watchable cast members, who add touches that develop some nice chemistry along the way. Although this is done through flirting glances and cheeky innuendo; there isn't a single moment of genuinely lusty attraction.

This isn't the kind of film you expect to be full of moralistic messages, but the filmmakers can't resist preaching. Righteous jealousy swells everywhere and verdicts are pronounced on the thinnest information. Still, there are provocative comments along the way (is it better to look for Mr Right or learn to live with yourself first?), and in the end the most interesting thing is that we're surprised that we care about the sometimes bad decisions these people make.



Facts and Figures

Run time: 30 mins

In Theaters: Thursday 14th March 2013

Reviews

Contactmusic.com: 2.5 / 5

IMDB: 6.5 / 10

Cast & Crew

Director: David Morris, Jacqui Morris

Producer: Jacqui Morris

Starring: as Harry, Heather Bleasdale as Barnabys Mum, Peter Cooney as Gallery Customer, as Paul, Benjamin Hart as Larrs, Mark Hayford as Blue team, Lucy Jules as Emma, as Alex


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