Love, Rosie

"Good"

Love, Rosie Review


Deliberately unstructured, this likeable romantic comedy holds the audience's interest with its strikingly engaging cast and a slick visual style, but the plot is both contrived and underdeveloped. As the filmmakers try out some wacky slapstick, pointed political moments or a bit of darkly emotional drama, the movie's tone veers so wildly that we don't quite know where to look. And by never managing to crack the surface, the script leaves the actors with little to do but look good.

The story centres on two childhood friends: Rosie (Lily Collins) and Alex (Sam Claflin) grew up on the same street in England, developing romantic longings that they kept hidden. After a drunken teenage kiss, they rebound into the arms of other people: Rosie hooks up with the school hunk Greg (Christian Cooke), while Alex takes wannabe supermodel Bethany (Suki Waterhouse) to the big dance. Then Rosie and Alex's plan to go to university together in Boston is derailed by an unexpected pregnancy. Over the next 12 years they live on opposite sides of the Atlantic, trying to get on with their romantic lives. Alex finds a serious girlfriend (Tamsin Egerton) while Rosie re-connects with Greg and gets support from a pal (Jaime Winstone). But they never stop pining for each other.

Shot and edited in a bouncy rom-com style, it's immediately obvious where this is heading, so screenwriter Juliette Towhidi has to work overtime to throw the audience off the scent, which leaves the movie spinning in circles while we wait for the inevitable to happen. Fortunately, the characters are vivid enough to keep us entertained, as people move in and out of each others' lives providing the laughs and tears for Rosie and Alex, as well as the audience. Even if the characters are predictable and simplistic, Collins and Claflin manage to find moments of real depth along the way. Although it's difficult not to think that one proper conversation between these lifelong best pals would have saved them decades of frustration.

Yes, the script draws out the resolution right to the very end, and this draggy inevitability will drive most viewers to distraction (rom-com devotees won't mind at all). It's clear that the primary target for this film is a teen girl who believes that the perfect man will eventually appear and make everything all right, which is a problem in its own right and possibly dangerous when combined with a rather too-easy teen pregnancy. But most audiences don't want to think too much during a rom-com, and this one fills that qualification perfectly. Think at your peril.

Rich Cline

Click here to watch the trailer for Love, Rosie


 



Love, Rosie

Facts and Figures

Genre: Romance

Run time: 102 mins

In Theaters: Wednesday 22nd October 2014

Distributed by: Lionsgate Films UK

Production compaines: Constantin Film, Octagon Films

Reviews

Contactmusic.com: 3 / 5

Rotten Tomatoes: 30%
Fresh: 7 Rotten: 16

IMDB: 7.6 / 10

Cast & Crew

Director: Christian Ditter

Starring: as Rosie Dunne, as Alex Stewart, as Greg, Art Parkinson as Gary Dunn

Contactmusic


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