Blue Ruin

"Excellent"

Blue Ruin Review


Dark and freaky, this brutal, low-key revenge thriller throws a bunch of relatively simple people into a moral quagmire, and drags us in as well. It's a remarkably effective exploration of how deep emotions can lead people into the most hopeless situations imaginable. And it features terrific acting from a largely unknown cast, as well as remarkably sure-handed work from filmmaker Jeremy Saulnier.

The title refers to the bullet-riddled rusty blue Pontiac Dwight (Macon Blair) has been living in since his parents were murdered. So when he hears that the killer Wade has been released from prison, he stalks him waiting for a chance to pounce. But killing a man is harder than he thought, and he doesn't feel much better afterwards. Also, Wade's family never calls the cops, so Dwight knows they're coming for him now. He runs to his sister (Amy Hargreaves) and warns her. And as things get increasingly messy, he turns to his gun-loving friend Ben (Devin Ratray) for help.

With his scraggly beard and exhausted eyes, Blair gives the film a terrific sense of inevitability: Dwight doesn't want to do any of this, but feels that he has to. As he begins to pull himself together, the sense of purpose seems to wake him up. And watching this adds currents of unexpected emotion in every scene, especially as the script reveals the original events that sparked all of this bitterness. It also makes what happens almost unbearably tense, especially since writer-director Saulnier depicts the violence as desperate and realistic.

Of course, the central idea here is that Dwight is caught in a cycle of vengeance that can never have a happy ending. As he squares off against various members of Wade's family, he changes from the hapless slacker into a man who is willing to pull the trigger first and worry about any moral fallout later. This is shocking and deeply visceral filmmaking that refreshingly refuses to explain every detail, leaving us to piece together the story and think about what we might do in his shoes.

Watch 'Blue Ruin' Trailer



Blue Ruin

Facts and Figures

Genre: Thriller

Run time: 90 mins

In Theaters: Wednesday 9th July 2014

Box Office USA: $0.3M

Distributed by: Radius-TWC

Production compaines: Paradise City, Film Science, The Lab Of Madness, Neighborhood Watch

Reviews

Contactmusic.com: 4 / 5

Rotten Tomatoes: 96%
Fresh: 110 Rotten: 5

IMDB: 7.1 / 10

Cast & Crew

Director: Jeremy Saulnier

Producer: Richard Peete, Vincent Savino, Anish Savjani

Starring: as Dwight, as Ben Gaffney, as Sam, Kevin Kolack as Teddy Cleland, as Kris Cleland, David W. Thompson as William, Brent Werzner as Carl Cleland, Stacy Rock as Hope Cleland, Sidné Anderson as Officer Eddy, Bonnie Johnson as Margaret, Ydaiber Orozco as Amanda, Erica Genereux Smith as Rock Girl


Contactmusic


Links



Advertisement

New Movies

Amy Movie Review

Amy Movie Review

As with his Formula One documentary Senna, filmmaker Asaf Kapadia cleverly uses archival footage to...

Terminator Genisys Movie Review

Terminator Genisys Movie Review

This declining franchise really needed a jolt to the head, but the producers disappointingly opt...

Magic Mike XXL Movie Review

Magic Mike XXL Movie Review

Resisting the temptation to capitalise on the camp value of these characters, Channing Tatum and...

She's Funny That Way Movie Review

She's Funny That Way Movie Review

Wacky enough to make us smile but never laugh out loud, this screwball comedy harks...

Advertisement
Everly Movie Review

Everly Movie Review

A relentless onslaught of violent action, this movie is notable mainly because there's a woman...

Slow West Movie Review

Slow West Movie Review

First-time feature filmmaker John Maclean takes a strikingly original approach to the Western, creating a...

Mr. Holmes Movie Review

Mr. Holmes Movie Review

Despite this being a film about Sherlock Holmes, the fact that it's not much of...

Entourage Movie Review

Entourage Movie Review

Both shameless and shamelessly entertaining, this relentlessly boyish movie carries on exactly as the TV...

Advertisement