Federico Luppi

Federico Luppi

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Phase 7 Trailer


Coco's wife, Pipi, is seven months pregnant and both are ecstatic about starting a new family. They decide to move into a small apartment in Buenos Aires that's perfect for their small family. No sooner have they settled in when they start hearing about a virus that's claiming an unusually high number of lives in Argentina.

Continue: Phase 7 Trailer

Swindled Review


Good
I love me a good con man movie. I love 'em right up. And while Spanish director Miguel Bardem's Swindled has most of the elements you need to create a movie that earns the film's title, it still doesn't reach the rarified air of classics like House of Games or even near-classics like Nine Queens, another Spanish-language con game that had you guessing until the final scene.

Start with the good: The first of two exciting stars, the elder statesman of Spanish cinema, Federico Luppi (Cronos), as the elder statesman of the Spanish con game. Happenstance brings him Ernesto (Ernesto Alterio), a small-time crook who joins with Federico to pull off the heist of their lives. The musky Victoria Abril, Federico's (improbable) ex-lover and the other highlight of the movie, stumbles into the scene with even bigger ideas. Before long they've concocted a scam that could net them millions.

Continue reading: Swindled Review

Cronos Review


Very Good
Watch Alias? You spent two seasons hearing about that Rambaldi device and what did you get by way of payoff? Absolutely nothing. Well, consider Cronos the finale that you never got, as its little bit of alchemy from the past is as good as anything J.J. Abrams could have come up with, I'm sure.

In a career of so-so horror movies (Mimic, Blade II), Guillermo del Toro made his biggest impression with Cronos, an alternately sweet, funny, and creepy horrorshow the likes of which we don't often see.

Continue reading: Cronos Review

Men With Guns Review


Excellent
I've never been a huge fan of the work of John "Mr. Pretentious" Sayles, and Men with Guns is hardly short on pretension, but this is truly one of his best films. It's also one of his least-seen movies, and it's no wonder why: The story is told almost wholly in Spanish and concerns an urban, Mexican professor who chooses to travel into the jungle to find out what has become of his students -- all bound for rural destinations where they have pledged to help the poor populace. The professor's journey is hardly one of nostalgia, as one by one he finds they are dead or vanished, victims of the cruel army (aka "the men with guns") that have been ravaging the countryside. Chilling and gripping, despite the typical overwroughtness of Sayles. Federico Luppi, as the professor, looks like a Mexican Bob Barker. Surprisingly, this doesn't detract from the rest of the picture.

The Devil's Backbone Review


Very Good
Guillermo del Toro returns to Spanish-language thrillseeking with this creepfest, a period piece ghost story that often gets under your skin, though not quite with the same dramatic flair as Cronos. Del Toro puts the action at the end of the Spanish Civil War in 1939, plopping us at a remote orphanage in the desert countryside. The orphanage has bigger problems than Franco, however: There's gold hidden in them thar walls, an unexploded bomb in the courtyard, and a dead kid at the bottom of a pool. Throw into the mix some pickled fetuses (and one horrific scene where the old patriarch drinks some of the brine), and you're set up for a freakshow royale.

Continue reading: The Devil's Backbone Review

The Devil's Backbone Review


OK

Sublimely atmospheric but erratically chilling, "The Devil's Backbone" is a promising Spanish spooker about a haunted orphanage, but it's too hung up on being more than just a ghost story.

Taking place during the Spanish Civil War, the film opens during a nighttime bombing raid in which a huge ordnance slams the building's courtyard but doesn't explode.

Months later when a war orphan named Carlos (Fernando Tielve) is abandoned at the remote, dilapidated institution, the rusting hulk of the bomb still sticks straight up out of the ground, looming over the day-to-day lives of the children and their caretakers.

Continue reading: The Devil's Backbone Review

Federico Luppi

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Federico Luppi Movies

Phase 7 Trailer

Phase 7 Trailer

Coco's wife, Pipi, is seven months pregnant and both are ecstatic about starting a new...

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The Devil's Backbone Movie Review

The Devil's Backbone Movie Review

Sublimely atmospheric but erratically chilling, "The Devil's Backbone" is a promising Spanish spooker about a...

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