Faye Dunaway

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69th Cannes Film Festival - 'The Last Face' - Premiere

Faye Dunaway - 69th Cannes Film Festival - 'The Last Face' - Premiere at Palais de Festivals, Cannes Film Festival - Cannes, France - Friday 20th May 2016

Faye Dunaway

Premiere Of Universal Pictures' "The Huntsman: Winter's War"

Faye Dunaway - Premiere Of Universal Pictures' "The Huntsman: Winter's War" at Regency Village Theatre - Westwood, California, United States - Tuesday 12th April 2016

Faye Dunaway
Faye Dunaway
Faye Dunaway
Faye Dunaway
Faye Dunaway
Faye Dunaway

The Huntsman: Winter's War Premiere

Faye Dunaway - Celebrities attend The Huntsman: Winter's War Premiere at Regency Village Theater in Westwood. at Regency Village Theater in Westwood - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 12th April 2016

Faye Dunaway
Faye Dunaway
Faye Dunaway
Faye Dunaway
Faye Dunaway

Los Angeles Premiere For Season 6 Of HBO's "GAME OF THRONES"

Faye Dunaway - Los Angeles Premiere for season 6 of HBO's "GAME OF THRONES" at TCL Chinese Theater - Hollywood, California, United States - Sunday 10th April 2016

Faye Dunaway
Faye Dunaway
Faye Dunaway
Faye Dunaway

Premiere Of 'Game Of Thrones' Season 6 - Arrivals

Faye Dunaway - Premiere of 'Game of Thrones' Season 6 - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 10th April 2016

Faye Dunaway
Faye Dunaway
Faye Dunaway
Faye Dunaway

'I'll Eat You Last' Sees Beth Midler At Her Very Best As The Witty And Cynical Sue Mengers


Bette Midler Barbra Streisand Faye Dunaway Michael Caine Gene Hackman

Bette Midler is Sue Mengers. In I’ll Eat You Last, the funny, outspoken actress plays the infamous 70s talent agent with such clarity and wit, that you can’t help but believe her throughout. Midler is the sole performer in the production and, while the set is visually interesting, she herself hardly moves from the couch for the duration of the play. But if you think this would make for a boring or static production, you clearly haven’t seen Midler act to her fullest, which is exactly what she is doing in the John Logan play, which opened last night (Wednesday, April 24) at Broadway’s Booth theatre.

The setup is simple – the play is set in 1981, when Mengers, who represented stars of Barbra Streisand, Faye Dunaway, Michael Caine and Gene Hackman is already losing relevance. But she isn’t one to moan about it – not on the surface at least. Middler is the perfect actress to bring the quippy, somewhat cynical, occasionally foul-mouthed Mengers back to life. She is an actress experienced enough to not only fill up the stage, but to also possess enough knowledge of the harsh world of Tinseltown, giving her character some essential depth. I’ll Eat You Last captures the essence of a woman who has experienced Hollywood to its fullest and lived to tell the tale.

Bette Midler, Booth Theatre
Midler has been collecting praise from fans and critics for her spot on performance.

Continue reading: 'I'll Eat You Last' Sees Beth Midler At Her Very Best As The Witty And Cynical Sue Mengers

Three Days Of The Condor Review


Very Good
In Sydney Pollack's strange spy thriller Three Days of the Condor, Robert Redford plays a playful and somewhat geeky analyst for the C.I.A. He spends his days reading books, journals, and any manner of written correspondence that is published or publicly available, searching for codes, keywords, and country names to cross-reference with Langley. He has a code name, Condor, which he has no particular use for until the day he returns from a lunch run to find his entire department murdered. Suddenly, he is on the lam, indulging in ramshackle espionage plots and rubbing elbows with foreign assassins. He's not a spy but he plays one pretty well.

Unlike the Condor, the viewer may only pick up the salient points. There's a smattering of names for several chiefs and directors: Wicks, Wabash, Atwood, Higgins, etc. Even the switchboard operator is given the title "The Major." There's a woman, Catherine Hale (Faye Dunaway), whom the Condor takes hostage and quickly embarks on a semi-romantic partnership with. When he's not busy connecting the dots, the Condor is being hunted by a tall gun-for-hire with a foreign accent given the codename Joubert (the indefatigable Max Von Sydow) and another assassin named simply The Mailman. It doesn't seem to matter much but, for what it's worth, it all seems to have something to do with a possible war in the Middle East and oil.

Continue reading: Three Days Of The Condor Review

The Towering Inferno Review


Very Good
There is so much to love about The Towering Inferno it's hard to know where to begin. Steve McQueen and Paul Newman are together at last! Fred Astaire gets drenched! O.J. Simpson saves a cat! Faye Dunaway wears Dacron! As one of the first mid-'70s disaster epics (produced by the King of Disaster, Irwin Allen), this supersized burnfest inspired countless star-studded copycats and lives on today as a sort of camp classic of its kind. It doesn't have Red Buttons like The Poseidon Adventure does, and it doesn't have Victoria Principal's cleavage jiggling in the tremors of Earthquake, but it does have pretty much everything else.

On the occasion of the dedication of the world's tallest skyscraper (which I for one would never consider building in earthquake-prone San Francisco, by the way), an A-list party is planned for the top floor. This way to the glass-enclosed elevator, please. Architect Doug Roberts (Newman) and builder Jim Duncan (William Holden) are proud, but they don't know that Duncan's cost-cutting son-in-law (Richard Chamberlain) has compromised safety for profit. Sure enough, when a small fire breaks out, things go really bad really fast, and firemen Michael O'Halloran (McQueen) and Harry Jernigan (Simpson) arrive on the scene holding their hoses.

Continue reading: The Towering Inferno Review

The Gene Generation Review


Weak
Here's a three-word phrase that'll get any film critic's blood pumping: "Starring Bai Ling." As an actress who's usually deployed to amp up a film's quotient of exotica and erotica, her presence, sad to say, usually indicates that questionable quality lies ahead. The Gene Generation puts Ling into the tightest leather imaginable, but she still has enough flexibility to do as much machine gun shooting and karate kicking as is required to save a future world from destruction by DNA tampering.

In the dark, Blade Runny dystopia in which Michelle (Ling) lives with her no-good younger brother Jackie (Parry Shen), scientists are toying with a glove-like device that can recombine DNA. In virtuous hands it could cure diseases for good, but in evil hands, it could be weaponized and destroy the world. That's how these things usually go. Let the chase begin.

Continue reading: The Gene Generation Review

Cougar Club Review


Weak
What movie do Faye Dunaway, Carrie Fisher, and Joe Mantegna have in common? That's right: Cougar Club!

Yes, the "MILF" craze has gotten so popular that even big stars (or at least people that used to be big stars) will show up for a MILF-oriented sex comedy.

Continue reading: Cougar Club Review

The Three Musketeers (1973) Review


Very Good
I saw the word "whimsical" used in one product description of this installment of The Three Musketeers, a faithful adaptation of the classic novel, and no word could better describe the film. It's a combination of belly laughs via non-stop sight gags, endless swashbuckling, and only a dab of plot, all of which serve to make this an engaging event movie that takes place in France instead of in space. Packed with classic actors (including Charlton Heston, Christopher Lee, and Raquel Welch), this is a fun, nearly farcical adventure that's definitely worth a look.

The Handmaid's Tale Review


Very Good
Margaret Atwood's highly regarded novel came to the screen in 1990 in an uneven yet still gripping production (newly released on DVD). Natasha Richardson makes perhaps the biggest impact in her career as Offred, the "handmaid" at the center of a dystopic future where ultra-right wing factions are in control of the government, martial law rules, and biological agents have rendered 99% of women sterile. Those women who are still fertile and have been convicted of some crime, however ridiculous, become handmaids, stripped from their lives and sentenced to service the remaining rich and powerful, whose wives can't conceive children.

Offred finds herself at the mercy of a good-natured but subtly manipulative commander (Robert Duvall) and his faded-star wife Serena Joy (Faye Dunaway). And soon enough she slips her way into an underground aiming to overthrow the fascist regime.

Continue reading: The Handmaid's Tale Review

Chinatown Review


Extraordinary
I do my homework. All right. So I don't always do my homework, but when it comes to film critiquing, I'm pretty good at doing my homework. So, since The Ninth Gate is being released later this week, I figured I should check out the Chinatown DVD, in order to get background on Roman Polanski's career.

Ain't homework painful?

Continue reading: Chinatown Review

The Rules Of Attraction Review


OK

Like an episode of MTV's barely-legal late-night dorm life soap "Undressed," with 20 times the creativity but without any more substance, "The Rules of Attraction" is a stylish, glib, endemically energetic diversion that's indulgently entertaining but could have and should have been deeper.

Enthusiastically adapted by Roger Avery (co-writer of "Pulp Fiction" and writer-director of "Killing Zoe") from the whimsically subversive novel by Bret Easton Ellis, it's a black comedy about the feral underbelly of modern campus life, full of cinematic invention but narrative superficiality.

Populated by teen-TV lightweight types trying to gain edgy credibility, "Rules" stars James Van Der Beek ("Dawson's Creek") in the movie's most resonant performance as antihero Sean Bateman, a deviant college cool-jerk -- who, for the trivia-minded, is the younger brother of the title character in Ellis's "American Psycho."

Continue reading: The Rules Of Attraction Review

Faye Dunaway Adopted Her Son, Liam


Faye Dunaway

Faye Dunaway's ex-husband, Terry O'Neill has revealed that her son, Liam, was actually adopted. The British photographer has tried to set the record straight after 23 years, as Academy Award-winning actress, Dunaway, has been trying to convince people that she is Liam's biological mother since his birth.

Related: 'I'll Eat You Last' Sees Beth Midler At Her Very Best As The Witty And Cynical Sue Mengers

O'Neill and Dunaway were married in 1983 and were together for four years. Now, he reveals that: "Faye was desperate to have a baby. She wanted to be a mother because her own childhood had been so rotten. But there came a point when she had to face the fact that kids weren't coming."

Continue reading: Faye Dunaway Adopted Her Son, Liam

Faye Dunaway

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Faye Dunaway

Date of birth

14th January, 1941

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Female

Height

1.70




Faye Dunaway Movies

Cougar Club Movie Review

Cougar Club Movie Review

What movie do Faye Dunaway, Carrie Fisher, and Joe Mantegna have in common? That's right:...

The Arrangement Movie Review

The Arrangement Movie Review

The poster proclaims: "If your wife insists you see it together, be careful." It's one...

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