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F. Murray Abraham - A variety of celebrities were photographed as they arrived at The 2014 Primary Stages Honorary gala which was held at 583 Park Avenue in New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 4th November 2014

F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham

Megan Mullally, Nathan Lane, F. Murray Abraham and Micah Stock - It s Only A Play Opening Night Curtain Call at Schoenfeld Theatre, - New York, New York, United States - Thursday 9th October 2014

Megan Mullally, Nathan Lane, F. Murray Abraham and Micah Stock
Rupert Grint, Stockard Channing, F. Murray Abraham, Nathan Lane, Megan Mullally, Matthew Broderick and Micah Stock
Nathan Lane, Megan Mullally and Matthew Broderick
Rupert Grint, Stockard Channing, F. Murray Abraham, Nathan Lane, Megan Mullally, Matthew Broderick and Micah Stock
Nathan Lane, Micah Stock and Megan Mullally
Nathan Lane, F. Murray Abraham and Megan Mullally

F. Murray Abraham - Opening Night for the Broadway play "Mothers and Sons" at the Golden Theatre - Arrivals. - New York, New York, United States - Monday 24th March 2014

F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham

F. Murray Abraham and Jamili Abraham - New York premiere of The Grand Budapest Hotel at the Alice Tully Hall - Outside Arrivals - New York City, New York, United States - Wednesday 26th February 2014

F. Murray Abraham and Jamili Abraham
F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham

Mandy Patinkin, Tracy Letts, Nazanin Boniadi, Jackson Pace, F. Murray Abraham and Navid Negahban - The 20th Annual Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Awards held at The Shrine Auditorium - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 18th January 2014

Mandy Patinkin, Tracy Letts, Nazanin Boniadi, Jackson Pace, F. Murray Abraham and Navid Negahban

F. Murray Abraham - Opening night of Broadway's Machinal at the American Airlines Theatre - Arrivals. - New York, New York, United States - Friday 17th January 2014

F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham

F. Murray Abraham - 2014 National Board Of Review Awards Gala - Red Carpet Arrivals - Tuesday 7th January 2014

F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham

F. Murray Abraham - 2014 National Board Of Review Awards Gala - Red Carpet Arrivals - Manhattan, New York, United States - Wednesday 8th January 2014

F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham

F. Murray Abraham - Opening night of "The Unavoidable Disappearance of Tom Durnin" at the Laura Pels Theatre - Arrivals - New York, NY, United States - Thursday 27th June 2013

F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham

F. Murray Abraham - Opening night of THE BIG KNIFE at the American Airlines Theatre - Arrivals - New York, NY, United States - Tuesday 16th April 2013

F. Murray Abraham

F. Murray Abraham - Opening night of 'The Big Knife' at the American Airlines Theatre-Arrivals. - New York City, New York , United States - Tuesday 16th April 2013

F. Murray Abraham

F Murray Abraham - F. Murray Abraham Sunday 1st April 2012 Broadway opening night of Gore Vidal's 'The Best Man' at the Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre - Arrivals

F Murray Abraham

F Murray Abraham - F. Murray Abraham Thursday 23rd February 2012 Opening night after party for Classic Stage Company's production of 'Galileo' at Pangea restaurant

F Murray Abraham
F Murray Abraham
F Murray Abraham
F Murray Abraham

F Murray Abraham - Amanda Quaid, Steven Rattazzi, Steven Skybell, F. Murray Abraham, Nick Westrate, Aaron Himelstein and Andy Phelan Thursday 23rd February 2012 Opening night of Classic Stage Company’s production of 'Galileo' at the CSC Theatre - Curtain Call.

F Murray Abraham
F Murray Abraham
F Murray Abraham
F Murray Abraham
F Murray Abraham
F Murray Abraham

F Murray Abraham - F. Murray Abraham New York City, USA - The 2011 New York Stage and Film Winter Gala held at The Plaza Hotel - Arrivals. Sunday 4th December 2011

F Murray Abraham
F Murray Abraham

Excellent Cadavers Review


Weak
Dull and pedantic, especially for an HBO production. This docudrama about the men who tried to bring down the Palermo mafia could have been much more. Instead, it's barely fit for access TV, big production values aside.

Children Of The Revolution Review


Good
A true oddity, in keeping with Australian cinema. What with F. Murray Abraham as Stalin (yes, the Stalin), who fathers a lovechild in the 1950s with a visiting Australian radical played by Judy Davis, how can you expect anything but weirdness? With early-career appearances by Rachel Griffiths and Geoffrey Rush, Children of the Revolution is remarkable for its sheer ballsiness, but the story is likely a bit too circuitous, self-referential, and unbelievable for most tastes. Ostensibly based on a true story, the sarcasm eventually gets so thick you find you need a mint.

13 Ghosts Review


OK
I swear Joel Silver and the boys at Dark Castle just keep making the same damn film in a nicer looking house. I can picture the gray-bearded man right now, sitting behind a desk in a plush leather chair, tapping his fingers together, trying to decide at which overtly posh location he shall strike next. The House on Notting Hill is surely on the way next.

Once again deciding to rely entirely on creepy art direction, set design, and half-assed CGI, Silver is back again at the whole "haunted house" game. Last time he handed up a haunted insane asylum (House on Haunted Hill) and a group of under- or overrated actors and said "boo." This time he hands us Shannon Elizabeth, Tony Shalhoub, Matthew Lillard, F. Murray Abraham, all sequestered in a glass house with Latin written across its walls -- oh yeah, and let's not forget the comic relief nanny (Rah Digga).

Continue reading: 13 Ghosts Review

Amadeus: Director's Cut Review


Essential
There's a moment early in Amadeus when court composer Antonio Salieri (F. Murray Abraham) wanders through a crowded salon in search of the famed prodigy known to him by reputation only: Mozart. Inspecting each young musician, he looks for some outward sign of genius: the "man who had written his first concerto at the age of four, his first symphony at seven, and a full-scale opera at 12."

Soon after, we and with Salieri first lay eyes on Mozart - not the halo-crowned demigod built up in music history classes, but instead a mischievous, arrogant vulgar puck with a cackling laugh. But Milos Forman's stunning epic didn't win eight Academy Awards for simply reducing classical music royalty to child-like stature.

Continue reading: Amadeus: Director's Cut Review

Joshua Review


Good
Movies produced with the support of religious or pseudo-religious groups typically employ one of two structures to get their message across: 1) Outsider comes to a sleepy town and wakes it up with his message of love and compassion or ability to perform miracles. Or 2) Armageddon arrives, the saved ascend to heaven, and the poor saps left on earth suffer through hell.

Fortunately Joshua is the former, and it's probably the most mainstream release to ever make it to theaters. With stars Tony Goldwyn, F. Murray Abraham, and Stacy Edwards, this is a classy production. Not only is the acting credible and the production values high (they even trek to Rome for the finale), but the story isn't all bad either. It's actually pretty simple: A man named Joshua (Tony Goldwyn) wanders into the sleepy town of Auburn one evening, rents a barn to live in, and promptly starts rebuilding the recently-burned-down Baptist church, unbidden by its parishioners. Meanwhile, the local Catholics take an interest in the cryptic man, employing him to carve a wooden statue.

Continue reading: Joshua Review

Surviving The Game Review


Weak
To survive the game you first have to survive the movie, an update of The Most Dangerous Game only with a homeless guy being hunted for sport instead of a blue-blood. Too bad for the hunting party (helmed by Rutger Hauer in a golf cap), they picked the wrong guy to hunt: Ice-T in dreadlocks. The acting is atrocious: Watch for F. Murray Abraham's pained shriek when his son falls off a cliff. Oops, that's a spoiler.

Amadeus Review


Essential
He was the first. All right, he wasn't the first. But he was the first to make such a fuss about it. Mozart was the first of all writers to be completely arrogant... and completely controlling, about his work. In this he was not exactly the first. He was, however, the first writer to be right in his self-assessment. Mozart had God's gift, and he treated it so arrogantly that it became his downfall.

Amadeus is the story of Mozart (Hulce), the composer with God's gift and the Devil's audacity, and Salieri (Abraham), the composer with God's pity and the Devil's vengeance. In Vienna, Salieri embarks on a jealous quest to bring Mozart to his knees, and, ultimately, his death.

Continue reading: Amadeus Review

The Sunshine Boys Review


Good
A highly regarded yet infinitely rambling Neil Simon comedy, The Sunshine Boys is notable mainly because of the Oscar-winning appearance of an 80-year-old George Burns, who returned to the screen after more than 30 years in retirement. The movie itself is a bit lackluster (clever dialogue, but it really goes on and on and on...), with two aging ex-Vaudevillians (Burns and Walter Matthau) in a duel of tongues after Matthau's nephew/agent has hauled them out of retirement to make a quick buck. Life imitates art, no? Burns would become a bigger star than ever in later years, as the Oh God series made him, well, a diety.

Continue reading: The Sunshine Boys Review

The Bridge Of San Luis Rey Review


Terrible
There's a sure-fire way to spot a lurching cinematic failure: look at the stars. Not in astronomic terms, but in who is in it and why is it not getting buzz. You heard about Clint Eastwood's Mystic River a long time before it came out because it had a big cast and they were all excellent in the film. Furthermore, the film itself was brilliant, one of the best of that year. So, one has to wonder why a film starring Robert Deniro, Gabriel Byrne, Harvey Keitel, Kathy Bates, and F. Murray Abraham (all talented actors) was released and forgotten within a week? It happens once in a blue moon but when it does, look out! You're about to witness a sinker like none the world has seen. Stand in awe of Mary McGuckian's The Bridge of the San Luis Rey, a true, honest-to-God blunder.

Thornton Wilder's famed novel has been filmed three times, including this one. The story is interesting and its ideas on religion and corruption are certainly timely. Brother Juniper (Gabriel Byrne, wasted as a pointless framing device) has recently collected data and put it into a book about five souls who lost their lives when the Bridge of San Luis Rey collapsed. The book implicates a bit of a conspiracy concerning the bridge's collapse, but the Archbishop of Peru (Robert De Niro) sustains that it was an act of the devil and that Brother Juniper, and his book, are calculating heathens. Most of the film is a flashback to the events leading up to the bridge's failure, mainly concerning the wealthy Marquesa (Kathy Bates), a young actress Dona Clara (Émilie Dequenne), and their relationship with the Viceroy of Peru (F. Murray Abraham). The Viceroy has impregnated Dona Clara and is a bold faced hypocrite for first shunning the Marquesa and then making Dona show her respect and humility. The only one who seems to really care about the poor actress is Uncle Pio (Harvey Keitel), the head of the acting troupe that Dona Clara is in. The film leads up to both the breaking of the bridge and the court's judgment of Brother Juniper. Neither goes well, as you might imagine.

Continue reading: The Bridge Of San Luis Rey Review

Star Trek: Insurrection Review


OK
By 1998, the Star Trek legacy was looking thin. The series had run through all of its big villains, Trek's cast was happily dabbling in other projects, and the memory of Kirk and co. had long since faded happily into the land of reruns.

But you can't keep Trek down, and the crew saddled up for this lackluster experience, the likes of which would typically comprise an hour-long episode of The Next Generation, and not even a season finale.

Continue reading: Star Trek: Insurrection Review

Scarface Review


OK
To say that Al Pacino chews the scenery as Tony Montana, Cuban drug lord par excellence, doesn't really do justice to the performance. Pacino tears into his lines with a lust approaching frenzy, ripping through scenes with an animalistic fervor, creating a role that has already gone down in the books as one of the great, if not the greatest, portrayals of a gangster ever to hit the screen. It's also, watching some 20 years down the line, laughably campy in a manner that the rest of this bloated, self-important film doesn't seem to appreciate.

Pacino and producer Martin Bregman had a good idea in wanting to make an updated version of the original 1932 Scarface, which chronicled the rise and fall of a Prohibition-era Capone-like criminal overlord (screenwriter Ben Hecht was a Chicago journalist with a lot of intimate knowledge of Capone). Handing it over to director Brian De Palma (who had specialized mostly in psychosexual thrillers like Dressed to Kill and The Fury), and screenwriter Oliver Stone (whose credits included an Oscar for 1978's Midnight Express but also Conan the Barbarian), was a daring move. Stone did a lot of research for the screenplay, hanging out and doing coke with drug lords all over Latin America, and De Palma promised to bring a certain visual flair to the proceedings.

Continue reading: Scarface Review

The Name Of The Rose Review


OK
Franciscan and Benedictine monks are dispatched to a remote monastery to resolve a dispute over doctrine in The Name of the Rose. When William of Baskerville (Sean Connery) and his novice Adso (a very young Christian Slater) arrive, they find the discussions have been stalled by the death of a young, talented scribe. The resident monks are all atwitter, wringing their hands and worrying that the murder is a sign of the apocalypse. Their fervor reaches a fever pitch as more of their brethren begin to turn up dead, describing some choice passages of Revelations. So William fires up his logic, ceaselessly name checks Aristotle and begins to piece together a mystery that involves secret secular knowledge, a labyrinthine library, and a struggle between wild religious superstition and cold reason.

Based on Umberto Eco's dense and demanding bestseller, The Name of the Rose, is basically a love letter to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Unfortunately, the film version never passes up an opportunity to remind us of that fact.

Continue reading: The Name Of The Rose Review

Finding Forrester Review


OK

What is it lately with all these talented directors challenging themselves to turn TV movie scripts into potent, or at least cogent feature films?

Steven Soderbergh took the lead with "Erin Brockovich" -- a Lifetime Channel story in anybody else's hands -- and with the help of Julia Roberts created this year's Oscar front-runner. Taylor Hackford took the hostage negotiation thriller "Proof of Life" and gave it real punch and humanity, when Hollywood doctrine dictates it should have been either a women's weepy concerning the wife's angst or a Dolph Lungren-level action flick about a rescue raid against Colombian kidnappers.

Now Gus Van Sant, onetime guardian of the quirky avant guard ("To Die For," "Even Cowgirls Get the Blues"), takes on an After School Special of a script about a ghetto littérateur savant and his reclusive white mentor, and creates "Finding Forrester" -- a solidly enjoyable, fairly cerebral feature raised above its roots by stout performances from its two leads.

Continue reading: Finding Forrester Review

F Murray Abraham

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F Murray Abraham Movies

Isle Of Dogs Trailer

Isle Of Dogs Trailer

Imagine a world without dogs. It hardly bears thinking about, but in this dystopian look...

The Grand Budapest Hotel - Featurettes Trailer

The Grand Budapest Hotel - Featurettes Trailer

While preparing to film 'The Grand Budapest Hotel', director Wes Anderson and company scouted for...

The Grand Budapest Hotel Movie Review

The Grand Budapest Hotel Movie Review

Wes Anderson's entertaining filmmaking style clicks beautifully into focus for this comical adventure. Films like...

The Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

The Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

The cast and crew of 'The Grand Budapest Hotel' discuss the story, the main characters'...

Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

Gustave may be aloof and snobbish in many ways, but he's also extremely charming with...

The Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

The Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

Charismatic but somewhat aloof concierge at the Grand Budapest Hotel, Gustave H, is less than...

The Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

The Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

Gustave H is a charismatic and over-friendly concierge at the Grand Budapest Hotel whose conduct...

The Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

The Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

Gustave H is a flamboyant and largely charismatic concierge at the Grand Budapest Hotel whose...

Inside Llewyn Davis Trailer

Inside Llewyn Davis Trailer

Llewyn Davis is a struggling folk musician attempting to find his place in the world...

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