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Kathryn Grody, F. Murray Abraham , Mandy Patinkin - People's Choice Awards 2016 held at the Microsoft Theatre L.A. Live - Arrivals at Microsoft Theatre L.A. Live, People's Choice Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 6th January 2016

Kathryn Grody, F. Murray Abraham and Mandy Patinkin

F. Murray Abraham, Kathryn Grody , Mandy Patinkin - People's Choice Awards 2016 held at the Microsoft Theatre L.A. Live - Arrivals at Microsoft Theatre L.A. Live, People's Choice Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 6th January 2016

F. Murray Abraham, Kathryn Grody and Mandy Patinkin
F. Murray Abraham, Kathryn Grody and Mandy Patinkin
F. Murray Abraham, Kathryn Grody and Mandy Patinkin

F. Murray Abraham , Julian Schnabel - Celebrities are attending Julian Schnabel's 64th birthday party at Paris Bar - Berlin, Germany - Monday 26th October 2015

F. Murray Abraham and Julian Schnabel

F. Murray Abraham, Micah Stock, Stockard Channing, Matthew Broderick, Nathan Lane, Katie Finneran and T.R. Knight - Cast change at It's Only A Play at the Jacobs Theatre. at Jacobs Theatre, - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 31st March 2015

F. Murray Abraham, Micah Stock, Stockard Channing, Matthew Broderick, Nathan Lane, Katie Finneran and T.r. Knight
Stockard Channing, Nathan Lane, F. Murray Abraham and Katie Finneran
Nathan Lane, Katie Finneran and F. Murray Abraham
T.r. Knight, Stockard Channing, Matthew Broderick, Katie Finneran, Nathan Lane, F. Murray Abraham and Micah Stock
T.r. Knight, Stockard Channing, Matthew Broderick, Katie Finneran, Nathan Lane, F. Murray Abraham and Micah Stock
Tom Kirdahy, Terrence Mcnally, F. Murray Abraham, Micah Stock, Stockard Channing, Jack O'brien, Matthew Broderick, Nathan Lane, Katie Finneran and T.r. Knight

F. Murray Abraham with his Oscar in tote - Re-opening night of It's Only A Play at the Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre - Arrivals. at Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre, - New York, New York, United States - Saturday 24th January 2015

F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham
Tom Kirdahy, Matthew Broderick, Jack O’brien, F. Murray Abraham, Terrence Mcnally, Katie Finneran, Maulik Pancholy, Micah Stock, Stockard Channing and Martin Short

F. Murray Abraham - A variety of celebrities were photographed as they arrived at The 2014 Primary Stages Honorary gala which was held at 583 Park Avenue in New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 4th November 2014

F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham

Megan Mullally, Nathan Lane, F. Murray Abraham and Micah Stock - It s Only A Play Opening Night Curtain Call at Schoenfeld Theatre, - New York, New York, United States - Thursday 9th October 2014

Megan Mullally, Nathan Lane, F. Murray Abraham and Micah Stock
Rupert Grint, Stockard Channing, F. Murray Abraham, Nathan Lane, Megan Mullally, Matthew Broderick and Micah Stock
Nathan Lane, Megan Mullally and Matthew Broderick
Rupert Grint, Stockard Channing, F. Murray Abraham, Nathan Lane, Megan Mullally, Matthew Broderick and Micah Stock
Nathan Lane, Micah Stock and Megan Mullally
Nathan Lane, F. Murray Abraham and Megan Mullally

F. Murray Abraham - Opening Night for the Broadway play "Mothers and Sons" at the Golden Theatre - Arrivals. - New York, New York, United States - Monday 24th March 2014

F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham

F. Murray Abraham and Jamili Abraham - New York premiere of The Grand Budapest Hotel at the Alice Tully Hall - Outside Arrivals - New York City, New York, United States - Wednesday 26th February 2014

F. Murray Abraham and Jamili Abraham
F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham

Mandy Patinkin, Tracy Letts, Nazanin Boniadi, Jackson Pace, F. Murray Abraham and Navid Negahban - The 20th Annual Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Awards held at The Shrine Auditorium - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 18th January 2014

Mandy Patinkin, Tracy Letts, Nazanin Boniadi, Jackson Pace, F. Murray Abraham and Navid Negahban

Inside Llewyn Davis Trailer


Llewyn Davis is a struggling folk musician attempting to find his place in the world by scouring New York's Greenwich Village at the height of folk in 1961. Along the way he meets old friends who are not particularly happy to see him because of his own unresolved mistakes in the past, and while he strives to find a venue to do what he loves doing, hitchhiking across roads in the freezing winter with a beat-up guitar and a homeless cat, he is forced to question not only himself as a person, but also where and what he really wants his future to be.

'Inside Llewyn Davis' is an emotional musical drama written and directed by Oscar winners Ethan Coen and Joel Coen, aka The Coen Brothers ('No Country for Old Men', 'True Grit', 'Fargo'). It has been very loosely based on the posthumous 2005 memoirs 'The Mayor of MacDougal Street' by the late New York folk artist Dave Van Ronk, and has been nominated to compete for the sought after Palme d'Or prize at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival. This passionate story about love, music, finding oneself and learning from one's mistakes will hit screens in the UK on January 24th 2014.

Inside Llewyn Davis Movie Review - Click Here To Read

Dead Man Down Review


Good

Here's yet another preposterous action movie that's made watchable by a skilful director and an engaging cast. While there are some intriguing themes in this spiralling odyssey of revenge, the script never really makes any sense out of the plot, merrily twisting and turning as it whizzes past a series of glaring improbabilities. But Colin Farrell and Noomi Rapace put their huge brown eyes to work, holding our sympathies as things get messier by the moment.

Farrell plays Victor, a gun-toting goon working for the slick mobster Alphonse (Howard), who is being taunted by a complex, unnerving plot to bring him down. But Victor is sidetracked by his neighbour Beatrice (Rapace), who comes on strong before revealing that she has seen his handiwork and will report him to the cops if he doesn't help her get revenge against the guy who scarred her face in a drunk-driving accident. This puts Victor in a difficult position since he's already engaged in his own plan to avenge the brutal deaths of his wife and daughter, assisted by a family friend (Abraham) from the old country.

And the plot gets increasingly knotty, as both Victor and Beatrice start to wonder if perhaps falling in love with each other might be a more pleasant way to get over their anger issues. Yes, the film is essentially preaching love and redemption even as the body count nears triple digits. Fortunately, director Oplev brings the same slick-steely style to the film as his original The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo. And the always watchable Farrell and Rapace get solid support from Howard and Abraham, as well as Cooper (as Victor's brother in arms), Huppert (as Beatrice's busy-body mum) and the underused Assante (as the big boss).

Continue reading: Dead Man Down Review

Perestroika Review


Excellent
Deeply personal, fiercely political, whimsical and unpredictable in style, and direct in voice, writer-director Slava Tsukerman's Perestroika resonates across personal, national, global, and even cosmic levels, all at once. After 17 years of self-imposed exile in America, renowned Jewish astrophysicist Sasha Greenburg returns to his hometown, Moscow, in 1992, the year that Perestroika ("restructuring") is sending shock waves through the social, cultural, and political life of Russia. Perestroika has meant greater political freedom, but it's a freedom without the infrastructure of purpose such that millions are flailing for opportunity. The young yearn for a vitality lacking in their cultural life, the elderly must live on measly pensions, the black market thrives, and vodka-rationing is causing widespread discontent in a nation rife with alcoholics.

Sasha (Sam Robards) has arrived here to address a conference on the structure of the universe -- his life-long obsession. The occasion reunites him with his testy old mentor, Professor Gross (F. Murray Abraham), and with Natasha (Oksana Stashenko), a former colleague and ex-lover who stirs up suspicions that Sasha may have fathered her teenage daughter before he left the country in the mid-'70s. The situation further compounds Sasha's midlife crisis: His marriage to Helen (Ally Sheedy), an American physicist, has fallen apart, and he's in the midst of a dead-end affair with another American, Jill (Jicky Schnee), a filmmaker accompanying him so she can gather newly declassified footage about the country's pollution crisis for her own environmental documentary.

Continue reading: Perestroika Review

The Stone Merchant Review


OK
Harvey Keitel and Jane March in a smoldering European romance? Sounds like a late-night version of The English Patient (even the title, The Stone Merchant, feels like it). And sure enough, there's a love triangle at the core of this bizarre art film, but that is far from the case. Believe it or not, you're about to see a movie about terrorism, specifically Islamic extremism.

Leda (March) is married to Alceo (Jordi Mollà), a professor who lost both legs in a terrorist bombing and is making up for it with plenty of bitterness and bile. When Leda is held at gunpoint at an airport (this family can't catch a break!), they jet off for -- where else -- Turkey, Here they encounter a stone merchant (Keitel), who hawks $30,000 rocks out of what looks a little like a roadside fruit stand. He chamrs Leda, and after she returns home to Italy, they continue an affair. Meanwhile, Alceo is soon convinced of his wife's infidelity, as well as something suspicious about the stone merchant.

Continue reading: The Stone Merchant Review

Joshua (2001) Review


Good
Movies produced with the support of religious or pseudo-religious groups typically employ one of two structures to get their message across: 1) Outsider comes to a sleepy town and wakes it up with his message of love and compassion or ability to perform miracles. Or 2) Armageddon arrives, the saved ascend to heaven, and the poor saps left on earth suffer through hell.

Fortunately Joshua is the former, and it's probably the most mainstream release to ever make it to theaters. With stars Tony Goldwyn, F. Murray Abraham, and Stacy Edwards, this is a classy production. Not only is the acting credible and the production values high (they even trek to Rome for the finale), but the story isn't all bad either. It's actually pretty simple: A man named Joshua (Tony Goldwyn) wanders into the sleepy town of Auburn one evening, rents a barn to live in, and promptly starts rebuilding the recently-burned-down Baptist church, unbidden by its parishioners. Meanwhile, the local Catholics take an interest in the cryptic man, employing him to carve a wooden statue.

Continue reading: Joshua (2001) Review

The Bridge Of San Luis Rey Review


Terrible
There's a sure-fire way to spot a lurching cinematic failure: look at the stars. Not in astronomic terms, but in who is in it and why is it not getting buzz. You heard about Clint Eastwood's Mystic River a long time before it came out because it had a big cast and they were all excellent in the film. Furthermore, the film itself was brilliant, one of the best of that year. So, one has to wonder why a film starring Robert De Niro, Gabriel Byrne, Harvey Keitel, Kathy Bates, and F. Murray Abraham (all talented actors) was released and forgotten within a week? It happens once in a blue moon but when it does, look out! You're about to witness a sinker like none the world has seen. Stand in awe of Mary McGuckian's The Bridge of the San Luis Rey, a true, honest-to-God blunder.

Thornton Wilder's famed novel has been filmed three times, including this one. The story is interesting and its ideas on religion and corruption are certainly timely. Brother Juniper (Gabriel Byrne, wasted as a pointless framing device) has recently collected data and put it into a book about five souls who lost their lives when the Bridge of San Luis Rey collapsed. The book implicates a bit of a conspiracy concerning the bridge's collapse, but the Archbishop of Peru (Robert De Niro) sustains that it was an act of the devil and that Brother Juniper, and his book, are calculating heathens. Most of the film is a flashback to the events leading up to the bridge's failure, mainly concerning the wealthy Marquesa (Kathy Bates), a young actress Dona Clara (Émilie Dequenne), and their relationship with the Viceroy of Peru (F. Murray Abraham). The Viceroy has impregnated Dona Clara and is a bold faced hypocrite for first shunning the Marquesa and then making Dona show her respect and humility. The only one who seems to really care about the poor actress is Uncle Pio (Harvey Keitel), the head of the acting troupe that Dona Clara is in. The film leads up to both the breaking of the bridge and the court's judgment of Brother Juniper. Neither goes well, as you might imagine.

Continue reading: The Bridge Of San Luis Rey Review

Scarface Review


OK
To say that Al Pacino chews the scenery as Tony Montana, Cuban drug lord par excellence, doesn't really do justice to the performance. Pacino tears into his lines with a lust approaching frenzy, ripping through scenes with an animalistic fervor, creating a role that has already gone down in the books as one of the great, if not the greatest, portrayals of a gangster ever to hit the screen. It's also, watching some 20 years down the line, laughably campy in a manner that the rest of this bloated, self-important film doesn't seem to appreciate.

Pacino and producer Martin Bregman had a good idea in wanting to make an updated version of the original 1932 Scarface, which chronicled the rise and fall of a Prohibition-era Capone-like criminal overlord (screenwriter Ben Hecht was a Chicago journalist with a lot of intimate knowledge of Capone). Handing it over to director Brian De Palma (who had specialized mostly in psychosexual thrillers like Dressed to Kill and The Fury), and screenwriter Oliver Stone (whose credits included an Oscar for 1978's Midnight Express but also Conan the Barbarian), was a daring move. Stone did a lot of research for the screenplay, hanging out and doing coke with drug lords all over Latin America, and De Palma promised to bring a certain visual flair to the proceedings.

Continue reading: Scarface Review

Muppets From Space Review


Good
Many critics will disagree with me, but I'm of the opinion that the Muppets, as characters, can do no wrong. Each Muppet has well-developed, quirky traits that make people of all ages love them. And that is what saved this film.

Unlike most of the other Muppet films, our featured star in this particular one is Gonzo. As we all know, Gonzo is a "Whatever", but this explanation of his species is no longer good enough for the long-nosed freak. He longs for family, and the satisfaction of knowing what he is. Then no sooner than you can say, "Wakka-Wakka", Gonzo's origins begin to reveal themselves. And they do this, ever so appropriately, through his breakfast cereal (well I thought it was funny).

Continue reading: Muppets From Space Review

Finding Forrester Review


Good
They're already calling it "Good Will Hunting in the hood," and it's for good reason. Gus Van Sant's latest takes us back to the inner city (or The Bronx, at least) for a second verse of that feel-good feeling, with none other than Sean Connery as a crotchety old shut-in who teaches (and learns from, natch) a local teen (Rob Brown) who sneaks into his apartment.

If you've seen the trailer, you know the story. The local Bronx kids live in fear of "the window," a ghostlike man who stares down at them creepily while they shoot hoops. On a dare, young Jamal (Brown) sneaks into the place, finding it cluttered with books. He's given a scare and Jamal runs off, leaving his backpack behind.

Continue reading: Finding Forrester Review

Excellent Cadavers Review


Weak
Dull and pedantic, especially for an HBO production. This docudrama about the men who tried to bring down the Palermo mafia could have been much more. Instead, it's barely fit for access TV, big production values aside.

Children Of The Revolution Review


Good
A true oddity, in keeping with Australian cinema. What with F. Murray Abraham as Stalin (yes, the Stalin), who fathers a lovechild in the 1950s with a visiting Australian radical played by Judy Davis, how can you expect anything but weirdness? With early-career appearances by Rachel Griffiths and Geoffrey Rush, Children of the Revolution is remarkable for its sheer ballsiness, but the story is likely a bit too circuitous, self-referential, and unbelievable for most tastes. Ostensibly based on a true story, the sarcasm eventually gets so thick you find you need a mint.

13 Ghosts Review


OK
I swear Joel Silver and the boys at Dark Castle just keep making the same damn film in a nicer looking house. I can picture the gray-bearded man right now, sitting behind a desk in a plush leather chair, tapping his fingers together, trying to decide at which overtly posh location he shall strike next. The House on Notting Hill is surely on the way next.

Once again deciding to rely entirely on creepy art direction, set design, and half-assed CGI, Silver is back again at the whole "haunted house" game. Last time he handed up a haunted insane asylum (House on Haunted Hill) and a group of under- or overrated actors and said "boo." This time he hands us Shannon Elizabeth, Tony Shalhoub, Matthew Lillard, F. Murray Abraham, all sequestered in a glass house with Latin written across its walls -- oh yeah, and let's not forget the comic relief nanny (Rah Digga).

Continue reading: 13 Ghosts Review

Amadeus: Director's Cut Review


Essential
There's a moment early in Amadeus when court composer Antonio Salieri (F. Murray Abraham) wanders through a crowded salon in search of the famed prodigy known to him by reputation only: Mozart. Inspecting each young musician, he looks for some outward sign of genius: the "man who had written his first concerto at the age of four, his first symphony at seven, and a full-scale opera at 12."

Soon after, we and with Salieri first lay eyes on Mozart - not the halo-crowned demigod built up in music history classes, but instead a mischievous, arrogant vulgar puck with a cackling laugh. But Milos Forman's stunning epic didn't win eight Academy Awards for simply reducing classical music royalty to child-like stature.

Continue reading: Amadeus: Director's Cut Review

Joshua Review


Good
Movies produced with the support of religious or pseudo-religious groups typically employ one of two structures to get their message across: 1) Outsider comes to a sleepy town and wakes it up with his message of love and compassion or ability to perform miracles. Or 2) Armageddon arrives, the saved ascend to heaven, and the poor saps left on earth suffer through hell.

Fortunately Joshua is the former, and it's probably the most mainstream release to ever make it to theaters. With stars Tony Goldwyn, F. Murray Abraham, and Stacy Edwards, this is a classy production. Not only is the acting credible and the production values high (they even trek to Rome for the finale), but the story isn't all bad either. It's actually pretty simple: A man named Joshua (Tony Goldwyn) wanders into the sleepy town of Auburn one evening, rents a barn to live in, and promptly starts rebuilding the recently-burned-down Baptist church, unbidden by its parishioners. Meanwhile, the local Catholics take an interest in the cryptic man, employing him to carve a wooden statue.

Continue reading: Joshua Review

Surviving The Game Review


Weak
To survive the game you first have to survive the movie, an update of The Most Dangerous Game only with a homeless guy being hunted for sport instead of a blue-blood. Too bad for the hunting party (helmed by Rutger Hauer in a golf cap), they picked the wrong guy to hunt: Ice-T in dreadlocks. The acting is atrocious: Watch for F. Murray Abraham's pained shriek when his son falls off a cliff. Oops, that's a spoiler.

Amadeus Review


Essential
He was the first. All right, he wasn't the first. But he was the first to make such a fuss about it. Mozart was the first of all writers to be completely arrogant... and completely controlling, about his work. In this he was not exactly the first. He was, however, the first writer to be right in his self-assessment. Mozart had God's gift, and he treated it so arrogantly that it became his downfall.

Amadeus is the story of Mozart (Hulce), the composer with God's gift and the Devil's audacity, and Salieri (Abraham), the composer with God's pity and the Devil's vengeance. In Vienna, Salieri embarks on a jealous quest to bring Mozart to his knees, and, ultimately, his death.

Continue reading: Amadeus Review

The Sunshine Boys Review


Good
A highly regarded yet infinitely rambling Neil Simon comedy, The Sunshine Boys is notable mainly because of the Oscar-winning appearance of an 80-year-old George Burns, who returned to the screen after more than 30 years in retirement. The movie itself is a bit lackluster (clever dialogue, but it really goes on and on and on...), with two aging ex-Vaudevillians (Burns and Walter Matthau) in a duel of tongues after Matthau's nephew/agent has hauled them out of retirement to make a quick buck. Life imitates art, no? Burns would become a bigger star than ever in later years, as the Oh God series made him, well, a diety.

Continue reading: The Sunshine Boys Review

The Bridge Of San Luis Rey Review


Terrible
There's a sure-fire way to spot a lurching cinematic failure: look at the stars. Not in astronomic terms, but in who is in it and why is it not getting buzz. You heard about Clint Eastwood's Mystic River a long time before it came out because it had a big cast and they were all excellent in the film. Furthermore, the film itself was brilliant, one of the best of that year. So, one has to wonder why a film starring Robert Deniro, Gabriel Byrne, Harvey Keitel, Kathy Bates, and F. Murray Abraham (all talented actors) was released and forgotten within a week? It happens once in a blue moon but when it does, look out! You're about to witness a sinker like none the world has seen. Stand in awe of Mary McGuckian's The Bridge of the San Luis Rey, a true, honest-to-God blunder.

Thornton Wilder's famed novel has been filmed three times, including this one. The story is interesting and its ideas on religion and corruption are certainly timely. Brother Juniper (Gabriel Byrne, wasted as a pointless framing device) has recently collected data and put it into a book about five souls who lost their lives when the Bridge of San Luis Rey collapsed. The book implicates a bit of a conspiracy concerning the bridge's collapse, but the Archbishop of Peru (Robert De Niro) sustains that it was an act of the devil and that Brother Juniper, and his book, are calculating heathens. Most of the film is a flashback to the events leading up to the bridge's failure, mainly concerning the wealthy Marquesa (Kathy Bates), a young actress Dona Clara (Émilie Dequenne), and their relationship with the Viceroy of Peru (F. Murray Abraham). The Viceroy has impregnated Dona Clara and is a bold faced hypocrite for first shunning the Marquesa and then making Dona show her respect and humility. The only one who seems to really care about the poor actress is Uncle Pio (Harvey Keitel), the head of the acting troupe that Dona Clara is in. The film leads up to both the breaking of the bridge and the court's judgment of Brother Juniper. Neither goes well, as you might imagine.

Continue reading: The Bridge Of San Luis Rey Review

Star Trek: Insurrection Review


OK
By 1998, the Star Trek legacy was looking thin. The series had run through all of its big villains, Trek's cast was happily dabbling in other projects, and the memory of Kirk and co. had long since faded happily into the land of reruns.

But you can't keep Trek down, and the crew saddled up for this lackluster experience, the likes of which would typically comprise an hour-long episode of The Next Generation, and not even a season finale.

Continue reading: Star Trek: Insurrection Review

Thir13en Ghosts Review


Terrible

A genuinely spectacular waste of money -- and about as mind-numbing as you'd expect from a movie which brags in ads that its "R" rating is for violence, gore and nudity -- "Thirteen Ghosts" has nothing going for it beyond its wildly excessive production design.

The star of the movie is an all-glass haunted house, designed by a grandiose and evil ghostbuster (F. Murray Abraham) to be a combination phantasm prison and gateway to hell. The joint has thousands of Latin "containment spells" etched into its transparent walls -- walls which move and shift to reconfigure rooms, thus trapping screaming B-list actors in with half-decayed, psycho-killer apparitions. (In the only worthwhile nod to William Castle's "13 Ghosts" from 1960, the characters have to wear special glasses to see the spooks -- much like the audience did for the 3D-like original.)

The house also has at its center a huge clock-like mechanism of gears and gyro-gadgets, apparently powered by the psychic energy of 12 enslaved spirits, which will open the aforementioned gateway only if one live person is sacrificed to become a required 13th ghost.

Continue reading: Thir13en Ghosts Review

F Murray Abraham

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F Murray Abraham Movies

Isle Of Dogs Trailer

Isle Of Dogs Trailer

Imagine a world without dogs. It hardly bears thinking about, but in this dystopian look...

The Grand Budapest Hotel - Featurettes Trailer

The Grand Budapest Hotel - Featurettes Trailer

While preparing to film 'The Grand Budapest Hotel', director Wes Anderson and company scouted for...

The Grand Budapest Hotel Movie Review

The Grand Budapest Hotel Movie Review

Wes Anderson's entertaining filmmaking style clicks beautifully into focus for this comical adventure. Films like...

The Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

The Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

The cast and crew of 'The Grand Budapest Hotel' discuss the story, the main characters'...

Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

Gustave may be aloof and snobbish in many ways, but he's also extremely charming with...

The Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

The Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

Charismatic but somewhat aloof concierge at the Grand Budapest Hotel, Gustave H, is less than...

The Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

The Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

Gustave H is a charismatic and over-friendly concierge at the Grand Budapest Hotel whose conduct...

The Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

The Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

Gustave H is a flamboyant and largely charismatic concierge at the Grand Budapest Hotel whose...

Inside Llewyn Davis Trailer

Inside Llewyn Davis Trailer

Llewyn Davis is a struggling folk musician attempting to find his place in the world...

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