Evanna Lynch

Evanna Lynch

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We Day UK Charity event

Evanna Lynch - We Day UK, a charity event to bring young people together at Wembley Arena - London, United Kingdom - Friday 7th March 2014

Evanna Lynch

'WE day UK' - Arrivals

Evanna Lynch - 'WE day UK' held at Wembley Arena - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 7th March 2013

WE day UK held at Wembley arena - Arrivals

Evanna Lynch - WE day UK held at Wembley arena - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Friday 7th March 2014

'GBF': A Hilarious High School Comedy, Or A Tasteless Delve Into Gay Stereotypes? [Trailer + Pictures]


Evanna Lynch Sasha Pieterse

Teen comedy GBF is set for release on DVD this week, after enjoying a modest outing (sorry) at various film festivals throughout January. With a cleaverly-written, light-hearted script and a peppering of quality jokes, captioned stills from the film are bound to make their way on to Tumblr before you can say "gay best friend."

GBF Movie
'GBF' Stars Michael J. Willett As A Gay Teen Who Is Fought Over By Wannabe Prom Queens.

Michael J. Willett stars as Tanner, a high schooler who, like his best friend Brent Van Camp (yeah, seriously) is gay. The trouble is, no one in the high school has come out yet which would mean a whole lot of unwanted attention for Tanner if he was the first. However, the more social Brent learns that the new "must-have" accessory for the school's popular girls is a "GBF": a gay best friend, which is supposed to be a fast-track to prom queen glory.

Continue reading: 'GBF': A Hilarious High School Comedy, Or A Tasteless Delve Into Gay Stereotypes? [Trailer + Pictures]

G.B.F. Review


Good

Sharply important themes make this film a lot more important than its wacky style might suggest. It's essentially Mean Girls remade with a gay twist, and the smart script continually acknowledges that fact. There's also plenty of surprisingly deep subtetx, which adds weight even when things start to get a bit silly.

The story centres on Tanner (Willett), a 17-year-old who isn't quite ready to come out of the closet, then is inadvertently outed by his best pal Brent (Iacono). Suddenly, the leaders of the school's three cliques (Pieterse, Bowen and Roquemore) descend on him: the first out gay student, he'll make the perfect accessory as a Gay Best Friend. And wannabe activist Soledad (Levesque) latches on to him so she can launch a gay-straight alliance. But as Tanner strains to fit the stereotype, he finds himself increasingly distant from Brent and their pals (Tarlov and Mio).

Director Stein shoots this in the colourfully wacky style of a Glee episode (without the songs), but even though everything is just a bit over the top, the screenplay grounds the situations and characters with stinging wit and subtle commentary on big issues like peer pressure, bullying, repression, religious intolerance and the reason girls like to hang around gay boys. This lets the likeable actors deepen their characters in ways that continually catch us off guard.

Continue reading: G.B.F. Review

Harry Potter actress Evanna Lynch

Evanna Lynch - Harry Potter actress Evanna Lynch seen rocking leopard print at Newstalk Studios for Pat Kenny Show... - Dublin, Ireland - Monday 7th October 2013

Evanna Lynch
Evanna Lynch

The 2013 Outfest Film Festival Closing Night Gala

Evanna Lynch - The 2013 Outfest Film Festival Closing Night Gala of 'G.B.F.' - Arrivals - Hollywood, California, United States - Sunday 21st July 2013

Evanna Lynch

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 Review


Excellent
The eight-part saga comes to a close with an action-packed finale that neatly ties up the strands of the whole series and also manages to give its actors some meaty scenes to play with. While it's hugely satisfying, there's also a letdown as we reach the end.

With Voldemort (Fiennes) in possession of the mythical Elder Wand, and four Horcruxes still at large, Harry (Radcliffe) and pals Hermione and Ron (Watson and Grint) know that they have work to do. Breaking into a Gringotts vault is tough enough, but when they sneak back into Hogwarts, they find themselves in all-out war against Voldemort and his Death Eaters. So with the help of adults (Smith, Walters and more) and fellow students (including Lewis, Wright and Lynch), they make their final stand.

Continue reading: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 Review

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince Review


Good
Darker and a whole lot drearier, this sixth Harry Potter adventure centres on a slow-developing mystery, and the filmmakers clearly struggle to give it much pace. It's well-made and watchable, but feels like an intake of breath before the frantic finale.

After the horrific conclusion of their fifth year at Hogwarts, Harry (Radcliffe) has a solitary summer before being drafted by headmaster Dumbledore (Gambon) into the ongoing war between the wizarding forces of light and darkness. And as year six starts, Dumbledore assigns Harry to get some important information from new potions professor Slughorn (Broadbent) about the Dark Lord's background. He of course does this with the help of pals Ron and Hermione (Grint and Watson), who with Harry are also caught up in conflict more typical for 17-year-olds: raging hormones.

Continue reading: Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince Review

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix Review


OK

It's gotten to the point where the quality of the films don't really matter: Now I feel like I'm committed to the whole Harry Potter series. I've reviewed the first five now, so by golly, I'm going to stick it out and finish the lot... even though I still can't bring myself to read any of the books. As always, consider yourself warned that I don't know the intricate backstory developed over thousands of pages in J.K. Rowling's writing. And really, I'm happy to keep it that way.

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix continues in the tradition of following another year at the Hogwarts School of Wizardry, where Harry Potter (Daniel Radcliffe) has faced nothing but grueling struggle after grueling struggle. His most recent year (Goblet of Fire) saw a friend get killed by his nemesis, the evil Lord Voldemort (Ralph Fiennes), who's gaining more power every day and giving Harry severe nightmares. With few exceptions, his friends have largely abandoned him, and the new term comes with even more headaches in the form of Dolores Umbridge (the perfect Imelda Staunton), sent from the Ministry of Magic to teach the defense from the dark arts class and eventually taking over the school as an iron-fisted, fun-crushing bureaucrat.

After much pottering about (ha ha!), the film finally finds its groove as Umbridge goes too far, refusing to teach magic in the classroom, instead preferring to rely on theoretical knowledge so the students can pass their year-end standardized tests. With Voldemort approaching (this guy is always just around the corner), Harry becomes more nervous that he will be unable to defend himself, finally recruiting a handful of students to his cause to teach them what he knows about magical combat. Together they prepare for the day when they know they'll have to use those skills. (In case you haven't seen any of the first four movies, rest assured it isn't far off: This end-of-movie showdown between Harry and the forces of evil has almost become a cliché that pans out every single time.)

Continue reading: Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix Review

Evanna Lynch

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