Erika Christensen

Erika Christensen

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Disney ABC 2015 TCA Summer Tour

Erika Christensen - Disney ABC Television Group's 2015 TCA Summer Press Tour held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel - Arrivals at Beverly Hilton Hotel, Disney, ABC - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 4th August 2015

Erika Christensen
Erika Christensen
Erika Christensen
Erika Christensen
Erika Christensen

Cedars-Sinai Sports Spectacular - Arrivals

Erika Christensen - 30th Annual Cedars-Sinai Sports Spectacular - Arrivals at Hyatt Regency Century City Plaza Century City, CA - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 31st May 2015

Erika Christensen
Erika Christensen
Erika Christensen
Erika Christensen
Erika Christensen

2015 Disney Media Distribution International Upfronts

Erika Christensen - 2015 Disney Media Distribution International Upfronts - Arrivals at Disney - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 17th May 2015

Erika Christensen
Erika Christensen

The 2015 Disney Media Distribution International Upfronts

Erika Christensen - A host of stars were photographed as they attended the 2015 Disney Media Distribution International Upfronts event which was held at The Walt Disney Studios Lot in Burbank, California, United States - Monday 18th May 2015

Erika Christensen
Erika Christensen
Erika Christensen
Erika Christensen
Erika Christensen

ABC Upfront Presentation 2015

Erika Christensen - A variety of stars were snapped as they took to the red carpet for the ABC Upfront Presentation 2015 which was held in New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 12th May 2015

Erika Christensen

Erika Christensen Has Broken Her Arm In A Biking Accident


Erika Christensen

Erika Christensen, the star of 2000's 'Traffic', has broken her arm in a bicycle accident. Christensen, who is currently starring in the hit US television series 'Parenthood', was seen in Los Angeles sporting a cast on her right arm on 5th April, 2011. The 28-year-old is expecting to recover very quickly, due to the cutting edge technology she has been given. 

Related: Mariah Carey's Broken Arm Isn't A Performance Obstacle  

The ultrasound device is fitted within her bandages, and spoke about the device - as well as the accident - to Tmz.com. She casually explained: "I crashed my bike... It didn't really hurt... This is for an ultrasound. It stimulates bone growth... technology today, right!?"

Continue reading: Erika Christensen Has Broken Her Arm In A Biking Accident

The Sisters Review


Terrible
Films have certain advantages over stage plays - locations can shift, laws of physics need not apply, and characters can do more than stand around and talk ad nauseam. Unfortunately, no one shared this world of possibilities with the makers of The Sisters, an aggressively frustrating and ultimately nonsensical waste of time and talent.The titular Prior sisters, hyper-literate and unlikable to a one, are conveniently categorized archetypes capable of little beyond petty bickering. There's the oldest, Olga (Mary Stuart Masterson), cold, repressed, and overly rational; the middle, Marcia (Maria Bello), whose vicious unhappiness has turned her into predatory shrew; and baby Irene (Erika Christensen), the idealistic peacemaker. The family, along with brother Andrew (Nivola), a spineless placeholder, and various relatives and hangers-on, assembles regularly for festive occasions as heartwarming as a pack of coyotes fighting over a kill.The melodrama is intimate but overly full of histrionics: Marcia is trapped in an awful marriage to an equally bilious psychologist and tempted into an affair - after approximately an hour of acquaintance - with a former student of her father's (Tony Goldwyn); two different professors (one acerbic, the other puppyish) are in love with the oblivious Irene; the entire family hates Andrew's trashy fiancée, Nancy. Each conflict plays out in vicious familial attacks and endless, self-congratulatory, falsely profound dialogue.The Sisters is based on the Chekov play Three Sisters, and I will title that Problem #1: It sticks too closely to the devices of the original. In Chekov's time, an unhappy marriage was permanent, love could be so socially unacceptable it was rendered unmentionable, and repression was a legitimate way of life. In a modern setting, the confines are simply not as limiting as the characters would like to believe. Marcia makes no secret of being violently miserable in her marriage and communicates with her husband solely in hurled vitriol, and yet she stays! For no good reason! This isn't a tragic character; she's a woe-is-me-martyr, and impossible to like for it.Problem #2 is in the adaptation of the piece from a stage play to the screen. I'd guess that, in the process, Richard Alfeiri was reluctant to make any significant alterations to his original or offer many concessions to the medium, because this reads exactly like a play. That isn't a complement; these characters do nothing but talk. In a stage setting, audiences are willing to put up with florid language, but for film, the dialogue is ridiculous. Characters pack every sentence with as many 50-cent-words possible - why say "live" when "inhabit" has so many more syllables? During one (of many) heated arguments, one sister actually says to another, "You do not understand my complexities enough to analyze and categorize me!" I wish I were making that up, or that it were an anomaly. But no, they are all so pleased with themselves, with their endless babble about the "nature of their truth" that every sentence furthers the desire to slap each and every character. Hard.Probably the biggest problem with The Sisters, however, is how great a waste it is. Despite the irritating script and visuals that are so sporadically fanciful that it looks as though Arthur Allan Seidelman is discovering the effects features on Final Cut Pro and wants to show them off, the cast is uniformly stellar. Bello's Marcia is deplorable, but she acts the hell out of her; same goes for Masterson and Elizabeth Banks as the uniformly reviled Nancy. All, really, are much better than the material given, so it is unclear what possessed such a rock-sold cast to sign on to such a screenplay, but at least their presence makes the film occasionally bearable.

The Upside of Anger Review


Excellent
There's an upside to Mike Binder's intelligent film about the torrent of anger one woman feels toward life. And depending on who you ask, you're likely to get a different response on exactly what that upside is. Easily characterized as a "chick-flick," The Upside of Anger deals mostly in the complicated world of relationships. My wife found it powerful and enlightening; I found it tedious and long. She yearned for more Joan Allen; I prayed for more Kevin Costner. And yet, despite our differences, the one thing we could agree on is that Anger packs an undeniably genuine, emotional punch.

In yet another robust female role, Allen plays Terry Wolfmeyer, a mother of four grown daughters who is consumed with anger after her husband mysteriously abandons his family. Terry's convinced that he's left her for his younger, more beautiful Swedish secretary. Paralyzed by her outrage, the only way Terry is able to deal with the situation is by drinking. Each day, from the time she takes her morning shower to the time goes to bed, Terry has a glass of vodka in her hand ready to drown her sorrows.

Continue reading: The Upside of Anger Review

Swimfan Review


Terrible
Erika Christensen goes from zoned-out druggie (Traffic) to lame vanilla psycho in Swimfan, unequivocally one of the worst films of the year.

Stop me if you've heard this one before. A cute young gal named Madison (Christensen) moves to a New Jersey town and instantly becomes smitten with star swimmer Ben (Jesse Bradford). But there's trouble: Ben's got a girlfriend (Shiri Appleby), and he's got a rough past... trouble with drugs and a stint in juvie. Now he's cleaned up and is eyeing a scholarship to Stanford, but an ill-conceived one-nighter with Madison lands him in all kinds of trouble once again.

Continue reading: Swimfan Review

The Perfect Score Review


OK
Ocean's Eleven meets The Breakfast Club as six ambitious high school seniors hatch a plot to steal the answers to the SAT and advance with ease to the colleges of their choice.

For the record, I scored an 1110 on my SAT, which was fine with me. Then again, I wasn't nearly as motivated as these kids during my senior year. Though they run in different social circles, the scheming students of The Perfect Score are united by one common denominator - the SAT stands in the way of their career aspirations.

Continue reading: The Perfect Score Review

The Banger Sisters Review


Grim
Without paying close attention, one could wander into The Banger Sisters expecting a warm and fuzzy friendship yarn delivered by an Oscar-caliber trio of Goldie Hawn, Susan Sarandon, and Geoffrey Rush. You'd be half right. The cast shows up, but the film substitutes "warm and fuzzy" with vulgar dialogue and gratuitously sexual escapades.

This is a shame, because Sisters introduces unusual characters that deserve to be explored, starting with Suzette (Hawn), a former groupie and by-product of the "free love" era who refuses to admit times have changed. Fired from her bartending job at the famed Whisky A Go-Go, Suzette hits the road to Phoenix to rekindle her fizzled relationship with her former cohort, Lavinia "Vinnie" Kingsley (Sarandon), the other half of the infamous Banger Sisters. Along the way, Suzette picks up a neurotic screenwriter named Harry (Rush), who's on his way back to Arizona to murder his father.

Continue reading: The Banger Sisters Review

Home Room Review


Good
One of the first -- and least-seen -- films to grab onto the Columbine craze, Home Room is a worthwhile (though ridiculously long) investigation into how two girls handle the trauma of the event. Starring Busy Philipps and Erika Christensen as the shut-out Goth and the carefree party girl, respectively, the film spends the bulk of its time after the big event, with Christensen in the hospital, nursing a head wound, and Philipps forced to spend to with her for some bizarre reason. Unfortunately, after we see where this is all headed, director Paul F. Ryan waylays us with another half hour of group therapy and scream sessions.

Flightplan Review


Grim

For two smart, nerve-wracking acts, "Flightplan" is a thriller almost worthy of the tag "Hitchcockian," in which Jodie Foster plays a distraught mother whose forlorn 6-year-old girl has disappeared in the middle of an overnight flight from Berlin to New York.

Already an emotional wreck because her husband has just died -- his coffin is in the cargo hold -- when Kyle Pratt (Foster) wakes up three hours into the flight to discover her daughter gone from her side, she loses it. Frantically searching the state-of-the-art jumbo jet, she becomes so unruly that the passengers are put on edge, the captain is called, and an air marshal (Peter Sarsgaard) takes her into custody while the crew looks for the missing child.

But startling revelations soon emerge about the death of Kyle's husband and other seemingly indisputable plot particulars. The whole dynamic of the film, and your perception of this grief-stricken widow, soon shift wildly -- and more than once -- as director Robert Schwentke (a German making his Hollywood debut) deftly rolls mood, pacing and Foster's gut-wrenching, cracked-psyche performance into an atmosphere of incendiary tension.

Continue reading: Flightplan Review

Swimfan Review


Grim

"Swimfan" is the kind of thriller that requires, for the plot to move forward, a complete absence of common sense on the part of the hero -- in this case a high school swim team star (Jesse Bradford) with a sultry, psycho, jailbait stalker (Erika Christensen).

No matter what crazy thing the deranged girl does to him -- leave her panties in his car, email him 81 times in a day, spike his urine sample with steroids, frame him for murder -- Bradford never tells a single person what's really going on because if anyone was watching his back, there would be no movie.

Which isn't to say "Swimfan" doesn't have its guilty pleasures. OK, one guilty pleasure. Christensen -- Michael Douglas's smack-addicted daughter in "Traffic," a beautiful girl with the heart-shaped face and sly, portentous eyes -- is such a fun, wicked, spiteful villainess that she keeps the flick afloat all by herself.

Continue reading: Swimfan Review

The Banger Sisters Review


Weak

Old groupies don't die, they just become SUV-driving, Donna Karan-wearing, what-would-the-neighbors-think soccer moms in Phoenix -- which is a fate worse than death if you ask the aging rock'n'roll sexpot played by Goldie Hawn in "The Banger Sisters."

Still a cute and curvy hardy partier decades after her backstage banging days were over, saucy, effervescence Suzette may be a free spirit, but she's also flat broke. Freshly fired from a perfect-fit bartending gig at the Whisky-a-Go-Go in L.A. (for no given reason except to set the plot in motion), she's decides on a whim to hunt down her best groupie-days girlfriend -- who she's heard is now a rich lawyer's wife -- hoping to relive old times and maybe borrow some money.

But it's been 20 years since Suzette has seen Vinnie (Susan Sarandon) -- who now prefers her given name, Lavinia, and has become a micromanaging Martha Stewart type with teenage daughters (Erica Christensen and Sarandon offspring Eva Amurri) that think she's the most uptight square on Earth.

Continue reading: The Banger Sisters Review

Erika Christensen

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