Eric Stoltz

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Caprica Review


Excellent
In the '70s, it was seen as a middling Star Wars rip-off, its story of hmans fleeing a deadly robot race nothing more than an excuse for cheap, made-for-TV effects. Now, three decades later, a revamped Battlestar Galactica has been hailed as one of the small screen's significant accomplishments. With the five-year run of the original series now over and done with, creative team Ronald D. Moore and David Eick are prepping a new franchise that will follow the technology that gave birth to the android threat and the oddly contemporary battle between faiths and cultural diversity that surrounds the science. And from the 90-minute pilot movie for Caprica, it looks like the pair has parlayed their talents into another winner.

When their families are torn apart by a terrorist act, robotics tycoon Daniel Graystone (Eric Stoltz) and Tauron lawyer Joseph Adama (Esai Morales) come together to heal their obvious open wounds. And when the man behind the burgeoning Cylon technology learns that his late genius daughter Zoe (Alessandra Toressani) had devised a way of creating a "copy" of herself via a personality database, he vows to find a means of downloading that information into something more "physical." Because of his underworld ties with the Tauron mob, Graystone asks Adama for a favor. In exchange for a little corporate espionage, he will promise to bring his child back via the program. At first, Adama acquiesces -- not so much for himself as for his young son William (Sina Najafi). But as he confronts his criminal brother Sam (Sasha Roiz) over Graystone's request, he realizes that man is not meant to play God.

Continue reading: Caprica Review

Some Kind of Wonderful Review


Good
John Hughes isn't best known for Some Kind of Wonderful, but ode to highschool misfits has its adherants, and sure enough it's one of his more grounded and lovable films.

Not as depressing as Pretty in Pink, not as random as The Breakfast Club, the film is a typical Hughesian love triangle among the short-haired semi-butch drummer girl (Mary Stuart Masterson), the sensitive (yet poor) painter (Eric Stoltz), and the class beauty who doesn't have money but runs in rich circles (Lea Thompson). Masterson clearly pines for her best friend Stoltz, but he either can't see it or won't see it. Besides, Thompson has perfectly '80s red hair. Naturally, the beefy, Miami Vice-dressing boyfriend (Craig Sheffer) wants nothing more than to pummel the guy who's pining for his lady.

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Happy Hour Review


OK
Mike Bencivenga has probably seen Leaving Las Vegas a few too many times as well as read too much Bukowski.

And with a title like Happy Hour, I think you know what you have in store. If you like your tragicomedy steeped in whiskey, this is your movie.

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Bodies, Rest & Motion Review


OK
The early '90s were a bonanza for indie filmmakers. Digital video hadn't hit the scene yet, so producers had to raise a lot of money to buy film and equipment, and they often got access to indie-friendly celebs to help them with the picture. Bodies, Rest & Motion is a high-end indie archetype, and it's populated by nothing but stars. The story is also proto-'90s-indie: Four aimless slackers, each with a spurious agenda, couple, de-couple, and go nuts at random. The driving force, if you can call it that, is Tim Roth's sudden urge to leave Arizona for Butte, Montana ("The city of the future!"), which culminates in his girlfriend (Bridget Fonda) sleeping with the guy (Eric Stoltz) who comes to paint their house. Because in 1993, that's just what you did. It's overall well-acted but often too stupid to bear.

The House of Mirth Review


OK
Draw near and bear witness to Gillian Anderson, a very successful television actress (The X Files) who is still trying to find her legs on the big screen. Like many before her, she will try a tactic that has made stars out of otherwise B-list actors: By taking the leading role in an art house flick.

Welcome then to The House of Mirth, a period piece which bears little happiness for those within. Or, ultimately, for those in the audience.

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Highball Review


OK
Noah Baumbach gathered up his Kicking and Screaming and Mr. Jealousy buddies and threw together this little flick in six days. He then stuck an alias (Ernie Fusco) on it, and that was about it. Mostly consisting of recycled jokes that didn't make it into his earlier films, Highball is still frequently funny while it's perpetually random. Gotta love Carlos Jacott no matter what he does, though. And extra points for creative use of two giant lizard suits.

Anaconda Review


Terrible
Really awful giant snake movie, notable for Jon Voight's worst role ever, where he uses the pet phrase "baby bird" repeatedly and is unforgettably swallowed whole by the creature, not to mention an early Jennifer Lopez appearance. Catch it on Cinemax or something if you feel you must, but we're hard-pressed to find anything worth recommending in this wannabe camp classic that turns out to be a wholly unbelievable camp disaster.

Kicking And Screaming (1995) Review


Excellent
Opening night of the Austin Film Festival and Screenwriters' Conference brought me this little gem, a story of five guys who just got out of college, the three women that float amongst them, and the question that haunts them all, "What the hell am I going to do with my life?"

I wouldn't look to Kicking and Screaming for the answer. Rather, the movie is a hilarious example of what not to do when you graduate. The guys, Chet (Eric Stoltz), Grover (Josh Hamilton), Max (Chris Eigeman), Skippy (Jason Wiles), and the show-stealing Otis (Carlos Jacott), can't seem to give up the college life. They hang out at college bars, woo freshmen, and sneak back into classes. Otis can't even seem to get out of his pajamas.

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Fast Times At Ridgemont High Review


Excellent
What, you ask, is this movie of movies? This one which you've heard about? It's an eighties thing, with not much appeal for the modern troupe because its slower paced, less funny, than what you might see today. But, like a lot of eighties movies, it holds its own merit. This adaptation of the book by Cameron Crowe (don't know who he is? I'll give you a hint. He wrote and directed the famous line "Did you know the human brain weighs eight pounds?" That's right, the maker of Jerry Maguire and Singles) is a coming-of-age drama about a young girl making the choice all of us make, sex or a relationship.Sure, we tell ourselves that both can exist, and they can, but there is the line that she draws: if she wants to sleep around or if she wants to have something to hold onto. And the movie, in a nutshell, is about that. It follows her and her friends during their last year in High School in the small town of Ridgemont. Where each one of them ends up with their troubles, ranging from no girlfriend to an abortion to adultery. It sounds serious, right?That's not quite on target.The movie has its serious moments, but it has its funny moments too: from two girls practicing blow jobs on a carat at a lunch table to a guy cruising for chicks dressed in a pirate cap. The movie is sublimely funny. And interesting. It's very sad, in my mind, that those things are so rarely seen in the 90s.

Naked in New York Review


Excellent
Earnest and cute, this essential '90s rom-com has Eric Stoltz going gaga over an enchanting Mary-Louise Parker, here in perhaps the least cynical role of her career. The story borders on irrelevance: They're New Yorkers who dabble in the theater, quickly hook up, then question whether they are truly meant for each other. It's all told in flashback as Stoltz drives his car en route to... where? Like I said, very cute, but some may find it cloying.

My Horrible Year! Review


OK
Really nutty after-school special masquerading as a feature film. With such problems as braces, no love life, squabbling parents, and a mirror that talks back to her, what's a girl (Allison Mack) to do on the eve of her Sweet Sixteen? Throw a romantic dinner to keep mom and dad together, of course. Silly, mindless, but harmless fun.

But check out the director -- Eric Stoltz! How did a guy more often associated with tales of murderous drug lords and down-'n'-out slackers come to direct a teen girls' flick?

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Little Women (1994) Review


Excellent
Hollywood did put out one decent flick over the 1994 holidays, and that was Little Women, another remake of Louisa May Alcott's famed novel. Winona Ryder steals the show, and most of the supporting cast are perfect. The story of Little Women is given a new breath of life with this film, and it is still as relevant about our place in the world and overcoming its man-made obstacles as it was when it was written. I mean, I'm like, you know, a guy... and I really dug the movie. Alvarado and Mathis shine above an altogether good cast (while Danes disappoints).

Some Kind of Wonderful Review


Good
John Hughes isn't best known for Some Kind of Wonderful, but ode to highschool misfits has its adherants, and sure enough it's one of his more grounded and lovable films.

Not as depressing as Pretty in Pink, not as random as The Breakfast Club, the film is a typical Hughesian love triangle among the short-haired semi-butch drummer girl (Mary Stuart Masterson), the sensitive (yet poor) painter (Eric Stoltz), and the class beauty who doesn't have money but runs in rich circles (Lea Thompson). Masterson clearly pines for her best friend Stoltz, but he either can't see it or won't see it. Besides, Thompson has perfectly '80s red hair. Naturally, the beefy, Miami Vice-dressing boyfriend (Craig Sheffer) wants nothing more than to pummel the guy who's pining for his lady.

Continue reading: Some Kind of Wonderful Review

Mr. Jealousy Review


Excellent
The long-overdue follow-up to Noah Baumbach's brilliant Kicking and Screaming, Mr. Jealousy is another look at a not-so-gracefully aging Generation X and its travails with relationships. Eric Stoltz stars as that typical Stoltz character with surprising effectiveness. A flawed but very entertaining character study.
Eric Stoltz

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