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See Eddie Reymane As Stephen Hawking In 'The Theory Of Everything' Trailer


Eddie Redmayne Felicity Jones James Marsh Emily Watson David Thewlis

Excitement for the forthcoming British biopic, The Theory of Everything, based on the life of cosmologist and theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking has been propelled forward twice this week: firstly with a still of the two main characters, Hawking and his wife Jane, and now with a full trailer.

The Theory of Everything
The first still released from the Stephen Hawking forthcoming biopic, The Theory of Everything

Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones assume the roles of the two main characters and will take audiences on a journey through the early stages of Hawking’s studies and the difficulties the couple face when he is diagnosed with motor neurone disease at the age of 21.

Continue reading: See Eddie Reymane As Stephen Hawking In 'The Theory Of Everything' Trailer

The Book Thief Trailer


Liesel Meminger is a 9-year-old girl who is forced to be separated from her family for her own safety. She goes to live with another German couple, Rosa and Hans Hubermann, who treat her as if she were their own. However, settling in to a new home is less than easy and she struggles desperately from disturbed sleep. In a bid to comfort her, Hans decides to stay by her bedside every night until she falls asleep. He discovers that she is in possession of a book, 'The Gravediggers Handbook', which it turns out was stolen and Liesel is unable to read it. Hans decides to help her further by teaching her to read, an ability that is enhanced further by the arrival of a Jewish runaway named Max, who the Hubermann's agree to hide from the vigilant Nazi officers.

'The Book Thief' is based on the 2006 World War II novel of the same name by Markus Zusak and has been adapted to screen by writer Michael Petroni ('The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader', 'The Rite') and Primetime Emmy winning director Brian Percival ('The Ruby in the Smoke', 'The Old Curiosity Shop', 'A Boy Called Dad'). It is set for release in the UK on January 31st 2014.

Click here to read - The Book Thief Movie Review

Anna Karenina Trailer


Anna Karenina is the young wife of senior statesman Alexei Karenin. Theirs was more of a marriage of convenience rather than love and soon Anna's eyes begin to wander elsewhere as her desire for romance becomes ever more intense. She meets Count Vronsky, a handsome cavalry officer with whom she enters into a passionate adulterous affair. When people find out about their involvement, Anna's honour is crushed in the eyes of the Russian noble men and women and she is forced to make a choice; to leave her loveless marriage and family and lose all honour and dignity, or end her affair with her possessive lover and be potentially forgiven.

Continue: Anna Karenina Trailer

Emily Watson and Screen Actors Guild Sunday 29th January 2012 18th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards (SAG Awards) held at The Shrine Auditorium - Red Carpet Arrivals

Emily Watson and Screen Actors Guild
Emily Watson and Screen Actors Guild
Emily Watson and Screen Actors Guild
Emily Watson and Screen Actors Guild
Emily Watson and Screen Actors Guild
Emily Watson and Screen Actors Guild

Emily Watson and Beverly Hilton Hotel Sunday 15th January 2012 Emily Watson,

Emily Watson and Beverly Hilton Hotel
Emily Watson and Beverly Hilton Hotel

Emily Watson, Golden Globe Awards and Beverly Hilton Hotel - Emily Watson, Sunday 15th January 2012 The 69th Annual Golden Globe Awards (Golden Globes 2012) held at The Beverly Hilton Hotel - Arrivals

Emily Watson, Golden Globe Awards and Beverly Hilton Hotel
Emily Watson, Golden Globe Awards and Beverly Hilton Hotel

Emily Watson Saturday 14th January 2012 Cinema For Peace Event Benefitting J/P Haitian Relief held at The Montage Hotel

Emily Watson
Emily Watson
Emily Watson
Emily Watson
Emily Watson

Emily Watson and ITV Studios Monday 9th January 2012 at the ITV studios London, England

Emily Watson and Itv Studios
Emily Watson and Itv Studios
Emily Watson and Itv Studios
Emily Watson and Itv Studios
Emily Watson and Itv Studios
Emily Watson and Itv Studios

Emily Watson and Odeon Leicester Square Sunday 8th January 2012 War Horse - UK film premiere held at the Odeon Leicester Square - Arrivals. London, England

Emily Watson and Odeon Leicester Square
Emily Watson and Odeon Leicester Square
Emily Watson and Odeon Leicester Square
Emily Watson
Emily Watson
Emily Watson

Emily Watson Saturday 7th January 2012 Celebrities outside the Soho Hotel in London London, England

Emily Watson
Emily Watson
Emily Watson

War Horse Review


Very Good
Spielberg takes the hit stage play (based on the Michael Morpugo novel) to the big screen with guns blazing, not only recapturing the heart-stopping urgency of war, but also cranking up the emotion exponentially.

In early 1900s Devon, teenager Albert (Irvine) lives on a farm with his impulsive-drunk father Ted (Mullan) and his tough-minded mum Rose (Watson).

When Ted overpays for the wrong horse to work the fields, Albert adopts the horse, names him Joey and teaches him the ropes. But when war breaks out in Europe, Ted sells Joey to a cavalry captain (Hiddleston). At war, Joey changes hands between British and German officers, a young soldier (Kross) and a French farmer (Arestrup). Meanwhile, Albert joins the army, heading into the trenches to search for Joey.

Continue reading: War Horse Review

Video - Celine Buckens Rubs Shoulders With Steven Spielberg At World Premiere - War Horse World Premiere Arrivals Part 1


The world premiere of Steven Spielberg's War Horse was held in New York at the Avery Fisher Hall. Celine Buckens, who stars as Emily in the film, graced the red carpet and rubbed shoulders with the likes of Emily Watson; co star Toby Kebbel and Steven Spielberg himself, who attended the premiere with his daughter Destry.

War Horse is adapted from the successful West End play, which in itself was adapted from the bestselling novel of the same name, by British author Michael Morpurgo

Emily Watson - Emily Watson, New York City, USA - at the World Premiere of 'War Horse' at Avery Fisher Hall in the Lincoln Center for The Performing Arts. Sunday 4th December 2011

Emily Watson
Emily Watson

Fireflies In The Garden Trailer


As a child, Michael and his father Charles have had a tense relationship. Charles would lash out at Michael for breaking the rules; once even attempting to hit him with a baseball bat when he intervened in a fight between Charles and his wife Lisa. Another time, Charles was made to walk home in the rain after claiming to have lost his glasses.

Continue: Fireflies In The Garden Trailer

Emily Watson Thursday 7th July 2011 Wembley To Soweto Exhibition Gala Opening at the OXO Tower - Inside London, England

Emily Watson
Emily Watson
Emily Watson

War Horse Trailer


In rural England during the First World War, a horse named Joey befriends a young boy called Albert. One day Joey is sold to the cavalry and sent to the trenches in France, seeing firsthand the horrors of the Great War, yet touching the hearts of everyone he meets, including a French farmer, a German soldier and the British army. Although too young to enlist, 16 year old Albert joins the army and heads to France to find his friend.

Continue: War Horse Trailer

Oranges And Sunshine Review


Excellent
For his feature-directing debut, Jim Loach (son of Ken) tackles a big story with topical relevance and emotional undercurrents. It's an earnest, straightforward film that's intensely moving and never sentimental.

In 1986 Nottingham, Margaret Humphreys (Watson) stumbles into something that seems unthinkable: poor children in the 1950s were bundled onto ships and sent to Australia, where they were stripped of their identities and put into indentured service at children's homes. As she starts investigating, in order to help now-grown children find long-lost parents, she realises that this is just the tip of the iceberg. Assisted by two of these orphans (Weaving and Wenham), she uncovers a horrific system that ran for four decades with complicity from both governments.

Continue reading: Oranges And Sunshine Review

Wednesday 16th March 2011 Dominic West and Monica Dolan make a grisly transformation while shooting Appropriate Adult, which focuses on one of Britain's most prolific serial killers, Fred West and his wife, Rosemary. The Wire star looks frighteningly similar to The Murderer, who was charged with murdering at least 11 girls, and burying many of their remains at his home, 25 Cromwell Street in Gloucester in the 1970s. The pair are on location in Manchester for the ITV drama, which also stars Emily Watson. Manchester, England

Oranges And Sunshine Trailer


Oranges And Sunshine tells the story of Oranges And Sunshine Margaret Humphreys, a woman who works as a post-adoption social worker in the North of England. Maraget receives a letter from an Australian citizen informing her that as a child she was taken from the UK over to the country she now calls home but wishes to trace her past.

Continue: Oranges And Sunshine Trailer

Emily Watson - Emily Watson, London, England - at the London Evening Standard British Film Awards 2011 at the Marriot Hotel - Arrivals Monday 7th February 2011

Emily Watson

Cemetery Junction Review


OK
There's a strong autobiographical tone to this British period drama, and the cast is very good. But by never focussing the story in a meaningful way, the film pales in comparison to its nearest predecessor, An Education.

In the Cemetery Junction area of Reading in 1973, Freddie (Cooke) is a young guy just starting a new job selling insurance while his best friend Bruce (Hughes) still works in the local factory and their goofy pal Snork (Doolan) makes announcements at the train station. Freddie clearly has ambition, and is happy when he runs into old flame Julie (Jones), who turns out to be the fiancee of his supervisor (Goode) and daughter of the company boss (Fiennes).

But both Freddie and Julie have doubts about heading into suburban respectability.

Continue reading: Cemetery Junction Review

Cemetery Junction Trailer


Watch the trailer for Cemetery Junction

Continue: Cemetery Junction Trailer

Cold Souls Review


Excellent
Like a collision of Charlie Kaufman and Woody Allen, this dark comedy is a surreal gem, astutely examining the issue of identity. And it gives the cast, especially Giamatti, terrific characters to sink their teeth into.

Paul Giamatti (as himself) is a New York actor rehearsing for a stage production of Uncle Vanya. Understandably, the play is depressing him, so he decides to put his soul in storage and lighten up. He finds a facility in the Yellow Pages, and the staff there (Strathairn and Ambrose) help him to desoul his body, although he's a little unnerved when, in a jar, his soul looks like a common chick pea. Meanwhile, Nina (Korzun) is a mule transporting souls between Russia and America, which causes rather serious complications for Paul.

Continue reading: Cold Souls Review

Synecdoche, New York Review


Weak
If it weren't for Charlie Kaufman, the phrase "famous screenwriter" would be an oxymoron. Kaufman has never won an Oscar, and most people, even true movie geeks, probably couldn't pick him out of a police lineup, but he's the only writer in Hollywood whose name is used to promote his movies. From Being John Malkovich and Adaptation to Confessions of a Dangerous Mind and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, each of Kaufman's movies is a singular experience -- quirky, affecting, and humorous. Kaufman's renown as a screenwriter even surpasses that of Quentin Tarantino's back in the mid-nineties, when he penned a string of critical and box-office hits that included Reservoir Dogs, True Romance, and Pulp Fiction. Tarantino's real acclaim, however, came as a result of his work behind the camera, not the keyboard. So it's no surprise to find Kaufman making the same transition in Synecdoche, New York -- his debut film as a director.

Synecdoche (sih-NECK-doh-kee) is a word whose meaning is too long to type out here -- and isn't essential to understanding the film, anyway. But it's just the type of word you might throw in the title of your first movie as a director if you wanted to let people know in advance they're in for something offbeat. And Synecdoche, New York is nothing if not determinedly offbeat.

Continue reading: Synecdoche, New York Review

Synecdoche, New York Trailer


Watch the trailer for Synecdoche, New York

Continue: Synecdoche, New York Trailer

The Water Horse: Legend Of The Deep Review


Good
It has to be the most incongruous concept for a family film ever. Take the myth of the Loch Ness monster, marry it to a near note-for-note take on E.T., and pepper the entire thing with a World War II era British boy's adventure tale. Add in the millennium-mandated CGI, some standard kid vid slapstick, and an ending that sees both Das Boot and Free Willy inadvertently referenced, and you've got Jay Russell's incredibly surreal The Water Horse: Legend of the Deep. While this cobbled together effort offers some intriguing ideas, things get messy quickly, and quite often.

It's the mid-point of WWII, and the household staff of a massive Scottish manor is taken aback by the arrival of an entire English battalion. They are there, on express permission of the owner, to guard the local lake and prevent German U-boats from advancing on UK positions. Among the servant family affected are head housekeeper Anne MacMarrow (Emily Watson), and her children Kristie and little Angus (Alex Etel). She's already suffered a wartime loss, and doesn't want her children harmed further. Into their life come two distinct beings. One is new handyman Lewis Mowbray (Ben Chaplin). The other is a baby "water horse" -- a mythic creature that takes an instant liking to Angus. While he tries to protect the beast, the forces of war threaten everyone -- and everything -- on the estate.

Continue reading: The Water Horse: Legend Of The Deep Review

Emily Watson - Monday 10th December 2007 at Ziegfeld Theatre New York City, USA

Emily Watson
Emily Watson
Emily Watson

Wah-Wah Review


OK
The obvious risk with autobiographical films is that audiences just might not in the end be interested in the same sort of story that the filmmaker wants to tell about himself. So it is with Wah-Wah, written and directed by Richard E. Grant, who based it on his own childhood growing up in Swaziland in the years leading up to the end of British rule - Grant might want to focus most on the film's dysfunctional (though fun in its own way) family and its effect on his young stand-in, but viewers may be left wondering what's going on outside that melodrama. It's a big world out there, and Grant only gives us teasing glances at it.

The boy at the center of everything is Ralph Compton, 11 years old in the film's preamble, in which he watches (once literally, from the back seat) as his mother Lauren (Miranda Richardson) screws a married man and then takes off with him. The divorce proves ugly and Ralph is sent off to boarding school, leaving his devastated father Harry (Gabriel Byrne) behind, fending off the occasional advance from local females. The film starts properly three years later with the return home of Ralph, this time played by Nicholas Hoult, sprouted quite a bit from his About a Boy days. Ralph comes back to find Harry just remarried, this time to an American stewardess he's known for six weeks, Ruby (Emily Watson). She's a breath of warm air, waltzing right into this snobbish little colonial backwater and immediately breaks practically every one of their thousand little etiquettes - night and day to the waspish, scathing Lauren. But yet it's not enough to keep Harry from hitting the bottle hard. Harry drinks, Ruby frets, Ralph fumes, and occasionally Lauren returns just to stir things up to an even higher pitch.

Continue reading: Wah-Wah Review

Equilibrium Review


Weak
I'll be the first to admit that dismissing any film as a Matrix clone feels like a cop-out. The pioneering thriller powered through theaters three years ago, yet films continue to beg, borrow, and steal their stunt techniques and sleek visual styling from the Wachowski brothers' remarkably innovative work.

While not quite a Matrix replica, writer/director Kurt Wimmer's Equilibrium duplicates too many elements from its sci-fi predecessor to ignore the comparison. The film inhabits a Huxley-inspired fascist future society where emotions are chemically suppressed. World leaders believe it helps prevent global warfare. If love and happiness are sacrificed in the process, so be it.

Continue reading: Equilibrium Review

Miss Potter Review


Weak

Chris Noonan's Miss Potter continues a rather long line of films that attempt to diagnose the creative process of a writer and the critical world that surrounds the writer's inherent social (emotional) ineptitude. There are moments where Miss Potter seems to be on the right track in feeling out the emotional trajectory of its main character, but it often chooses the route of greater cuteness over the challenges of trying to study the life of a writer.

Beatrix Potter (Renée Zellweger) came from a well-off family and was well past her marriage date when three brothers agreed to publish her book, expecting nothing more than a minor profit. In case the name doesn't ring a bell, Miss Potter was the brains behind the beloved Peter Rabbit and several other indelible creatures of delightful fantasy. When the elder statesmen of the publishing firm deem the project unworthy of their time, they send their young brother (Ewan McGregor), to handle the book and its flighty author. As you may guess, the two fall head-over-heels, much to the chagrin of Beatrix's parents (Bill Patterson and Barbara Flynn) and to the glee of his sister (Emily Watson, the film's most evident charm factory).

Noonan, best known for the now classic Babe, treats his subject with the same well-dressed adorability that Potter gave her creatures, most notably Peter. A more easygoing version of Marc Forster's Finding Neverland, Miss Potter spends more time striving to deal with the relationship status of its heroine than delving into the quixotic charm of her writing process. The better parts of the film are the flourishes of animated hallucinogenics that Noonan puts in as a reminder of where these creations came from: Beatrix's parlor of emotional eccentricities.

The problem is that, when push comes to shove, we've seen Potter's story before, and Miss Potter is severely lacking in trying to differentiate its source material from any other classically-tinted story of love and writing. Acting-wise, there couldn't be a sweeter bunch of actors to add to the candy-coated shell the film inhabits. But the film invariably goes for impenetrable cuteness, even when a rather obvious tragedy occurs. In fact, all the drama that arises seems to be treated with fumbling, patronizing dullness to give more ample weight to what is a rather wanting character study.

Rereading the Peter Rabbit books, you have to marvel at the simplicity and class that the books had in telling a story with a solid moral. What Miss Potter doesn't have is the creative veil that Potter herself gave these wonderful stories. The film could have been so detailed and surreal, yet it relies on whimsy like the animated whirl of Beatrix's parents stepping into a cartoon pumpkin led by four monstrous rabbits. It is missing that childlike love for nature and animals that Beatrix must have had, and in turn, forgets what it's like to have an imagination.

Not Harry's mom.

Miss Potter Review


Weak
Chris Noonan's Miss Potter continues a rather long line of films that attempt to diagnose the creative process of a writer and the critical world that surrounds the writer's inherent social (emotional) ineptitude. There are moments where Miss Potter seems to be on the right track in feeling out the emotional trajectory of its main character, but it often chooses the route of greater cuteness over the challenges of trying to study the life of a writer.

Beatrix Potter (Renée Zellweger) came from a well-off family and was well past her marriage date when three brothers agreed to publish her book, expecting nothing more than a minor profit. In case the name doesn't ring a bell, Miss Potter was the brains behind the beloved Peter Rabbit and several other indelible creatures of delightful fantasy. When the elder statesmen of the publishing firm deem the project unworthy of their time, they send their young brother (Ewan McGregor), to handle the book and its flighty author. As you may guess, the two fall head-over-heels, much to the chagrin of Beatrix's parents (Bill Patterson and Barbara Flynn) and to the glee of his sister (Emily Watson, the film's most evident charm factory).

Continue reading: Miss Potter Review

The Proposition Review


Excellent

The opening of John Hillcoat's The Proposition wastes no time getting you in the mood. Four or five criminals are being shot at in a small shack and quickly answer back with ample fire power. Blood spurts everywhere, and two Asian prostitutes are quickly disposed of.

It's the 1880s: Dirt and dust are on the rise and hygiene is sadly in decline. The Burns brothers have been split up: Eddie (Danny Huston) has run off into the desert caves of Australia while Charlie (Guy Pearce) and Mike (Richard Wilson) have gotten snagged in a gunfight. The captain of the local English sheriffs, Captain Stanley (a brooding Ray Winstone), has ordered the hanging of Mike but tells Charlie that if he kills Eddie, he will turn them both free.

Continue reading: The Proposition Review

Punch-Drunk Love Review


OK
Most wouldn't put Paul Thomas Anderson and the genre of romantic comedy in the same room and expect them to work together well. The director of Magnolia and Boogie Nights tends to shy from the formulaic filmmaking inherent in warming the hearts of couples, and that's certainly not the purpose of Punch-Drunk Love. The problem is defining just exactly what that purpose is to begin with.

The estimable Emily Watson plays Lena Leonard, Barry Egan's (Adam Sandler) ultimate dream woman. In fact, she's everyone's vision of virtue in her ability to ignore or simply not care about whatever foolish stunt Barry pulls. Perhaps, as the heavy-laid music at one point suggests, the very attraction is that she is so normal while he is such a buffoon. Once you get over the idea that love at first sight with two eclectic characters would be cute, something has to provoke you to root for the cause, and whatever that could have been never happens.

Continue reading: Punch-Drunk Love Review

Corpse Bride Review


Good
Comparisons between Tim Burton's stop-motion endeavors The Nightmare Before Christmas (which he co-wrote) and Corpse Bride (which he co-directed) are inevitable and unfair. The former will always be the Neil Armstrong of this particular animation genre, the first feature-length example of its kind that injects a challenging medium with creativity and heart.

Bride, now the Buzz Aldrin of Burton's stop-motion movies, strains under the effort to duplicate Nightmare's success, but it simply lacks that new-car smell. While still inventive in parts, it's nowhere near as innovative. Burton and collaborator Mike Johnson are content to walk an established path where the superior Nightmare feverishly broke hallowed ground.

Continue reading: Corpse Bride Review

Red Dragon Review


Very Good
Red Dragon has just about everything going against it.

It's the third movie in a series that won an insane number of Oscars (The Silence of the Lambs) and was promptly followed by one of the worst films in recent memory (Hannibal). It's a prequel... and its big star (Anthony Hopkins) is about 20 years too old. And it's a remake of a minor cult classic (Manhunter), a fantastic film which will invariably stomp the crap out of Red Dragon in the history books.

Continue reading: Red Dragon Review

Breaking The Waves Review


Very Good
Lars von Trier knows weird and creepy. In northern Scotland, a woman (Watson) pines away in prayer for her husband (Skarsgård), who is offshore on an oil rig. When he is knocked into vegetable-land in an accident, he asks her to have sex with other men since he is unable to do so. Things get more and more deviant, while Watson's religious fervor gets more and more pronounced. Keep your eyes open -- despite an ass-numbing length (just shy of 3 hours), Watson's Oscar-nominated performance and a goose-bump-raising tale make Breaking the Waves a rare creepfest.

Angela's Ashes Review


OK
Cigarettes.

The title: Angela's Ashes refers to cigarettes and not cremation. If someone had told me this before I had entered the film, I might have enjoyed it more than I did. Then again, if someone had told me about the rest of the film, I might have asked for a final cigarette before going in to Angela's Ashes.

Continue reading: Angela's Ashes Review

Separate Lies Review


Good
A film that would be perfectly at home on the BBC or PBS, Julian Fellowes' Separate Lies is a solid if somewhat stolid tale of romance, betrayal, and deception that's something akin to Gosford Park (which Fellowes' scripted) by way of In the Bedroom. Adapted from Nigel Balchin's novel A Way Through the Wood, Fellowes' directorial debut is much like its upper-crust married protagonists James (Tom Wilkinson) and Anne Manning (Emily Watson) in that its competent and classy exterior masks a messy, banal interior as it charts the couple's slow disintegration. With made-for-TV blandness, the film chronicles adultery, murder, and deceit involving callous young stallion William Bule (Rupert Everett) and the Mannings' loyal maid Maggie (Linda Bassett). That isn't to say that this well-acted, tasteful film is a waste; rather, it's simply a somewhat stuffy British production whose boilerplate melodrama leaves little room for a revelatory examination of selfishness, sneakiness, self-preservation, and sacrifice.

James and Anne's wealth affords them life's finest luxury accoutrements (residences in both London and the country, fancy cars, servants), but restlessness simmers underneath this apparently cheery, perfect veneer, with Anne soon catapulting their domestic bliss into chaos when she begins a torrid affair with William. When a mysterious Range Rover runs down Maggie's husband, Anne and William come under suspicion for the murder from both the police and James, the latter of whom endeavors to protect his wife (and, equally as important, his own reputation as a big-time barrister) by helping to cover up her possible role in the crime. Fellowes wastes little time on mystery, however, as his prime preoccupation is the method by which relationships crumble due to tragedies both big (the hit-and-run death) and, just as vitally, small (James and Anne's lack of warmth, inability to communicate, and joint desire to sweep unhappiness under the Persian rug lest it disrupt their comfortable existence). And with Anne unwilling to cast aside her youngish paramour to return to her husband, the film quickly becomes a case study in people's inability to fully suppress their most urgent desires and discontent.

Continue reading: Separate Lies Review

Cradle Will Rock Review


Very Good
Arguably, one of the best directors of the motion picture industry, Orson Welles was once quoted as saying, "When I die, they'll be picking over my creative bones. The films will suddenly get financing; the films will get restored. Old scripts that we couldn't get financed, they'll find the financing for some kid to direct."

Strangely enough, Welles couldn't have been more prophetic.

Continue reading: Cradle Will Rock Review

The Boxer Review


Very Good
What kind of boxer doesn't have a killer instinct? Well, after 14 years in prison for IRA-related crimes, you might lose your taste for violence too. And that's exactly what Daniel Day-Lewis's Boxer does -- he can't finish a fight, and when called upon by his old IRA buddies, he can't work for them either. This gets our Irish friend in a heap of trouble, making for a reasonably good movie, no matter how creepy Emily Watson is. (Which is to say: pretty damn creepy.)

Cradle Will Rock Review


Very Good

A wonderfully ambitious, old-school ensemble piece, very much in the can-do spirit of the community to which it pays homage, "Cradle Will Rock" is a politically-undertoned dramedy about theater, censorship, ambition, apprehension, oppression, Orson Welles and the Great Depression.

Written and directed by Tim Robbins -- never one to shy away from cause-fueled entertainment -- this passionate labor of love celebrates and fictionalizes a legendary moment in American theater, when the government shut down the performance of a musical produced by the Works Progress Administration -- and the actors, at the risk of losing their jobs during the bleakest economic season in U.S. history, staged it anyway in a show of inspiring solidarity.

The play was entitled "The Cradle Will Rock" and its story of a greedy industrialist taken down by the organized working man made a lot of federal bureaucrats see red -- as in communism.

Continue reading: Cradle Will Rock Review

Equilibrium Review


Unbearable

The worst theatrically released sci-fi flick since "Battlefield Earth," "Equilibrium" is so blatantly derivative as to be insulting, so absurdly hackneyed it's hard to believe it's sincere, so full of scenery-chomping it's a wonder the actors don't weigh 300 lbs. by the closing credits -- and as a result it's such a laugh riot that it may well be the funniest movie of 2002.

The plot -- brazenly pillaged from "Fahrenheit 451," "1984" and "Brave New World" -- concerns a high-ranking government "Cleric" named John Preston (chisel-featured Christian Bale), a ruthless and deadly law enforcer in a "Metropolis"-styled dystopian future where emotions (and by extension, music, art, poetry, etc.) have been outlawed.

The populace takes twice-daily doses of a stupefacient called Prozium, but when passionless Preston misses a couple injections, has a confusing day of emerging feelings, then finds himself staring into the big brown eyes of a cute little puppy he's supposed to kill during a raid on a "sense offender" hideout (insert shots of famous paintings being torched with a flame-thrower here), he...just...can't...do it.

Continue reading: Equilibrium Review

Emily Watson

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Emily Watson

Date of birth

14th January, 1967

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Female

Height

1.73


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Emily Watson Movies

Everest Movie Review

Everest Movie Review

With visually stunning imagery and a solid A-list cast, this film just about transcends its...

Everest Trailer

Everest Trailer

When two different climbing parties set out on the expedition of their lives, they knew...

Everest - Teaser Trailer

Everest - Teaser Trailer

Some people get a once in a lifetime chance to make history. Some people, unfortunately...

A Royal Night Out Movie Review

A Royal Night Out Movie Review

Although it takes a breezy, sometimes silly approach to a fragment of a true story,...

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A Royal Night Out Trailer

A Royal Night Out Trailer

Princess Margaret and Princess Elizabeth are distinctly unworldly despite their prestigious education as young women,...

Testament of Youth Movie Review

Testament of Youth Movie Review

A classic British memoir gets the full costume drama treatment with this beautifully crafted World...

The Theory of Everything Movie Review

The Theory of Everything Movie Review

An unusual point of view prevents this from ever turning into the standard biopic, but...

Little Boy Trailer

Little Boy Trailer

Pepper Flynt Busbee (Jakob Salvati) is a 7-year-old boy who stands much shorter than any...

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Testament of Youth Trailer

Testament of Youth Trailer

Vera Brittain is an extraordinarily talented young woman who battles the odds to land herself...

The Theory Of Everything Trailer

The Theory Of Everything Trailer

Coming from a privileged upbringing, cosmologist and theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking naturally had a first-rate...

Belle Movie Review

Belle Movie Review

The plot feels like a Jane Austen novel infused with a hot-potato political issue, but...

The Book Thief Movie Review

The Book Thief Movie Review

While there's a strong story in here about the power of literature and the fragility...

Belle Trailer

Belle Trailer

Dido Elizabeth Belle is the mixed race daughter of Royal Navy officer Captain John Lindsay...

The Book Thief Trailer

The Book Thief Trailer

Liesel Meminger is a 9-year-old girl who is forced to be separated from her family...

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