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Emily Mortimer, Ewan McGregor, Dolly Wells and Alessandro Nivola - Edinburgh International Film Festival - 'Doll & Em' - Photocall at Lyceum Theatre - Edinburgh, United Kingdom - Saturday 20th June 2015

Emily Mortimer, Ewan Mcgregor, Dolly Wells and Alessandro Nivola
Emily Mortimer, Ewan Mcgregor, Dolly Wells and Alessandro Nivola
Dolly Wells, Alessandro Nivola and Emily Mortimer
Dolly Wells and Emily Mortimer
Dolly Wells and Emily Mortimer
Emily Mortimer

Emily Mortimer, Ewan McGregor, Dolly Wells and Alessandro Nivola - Edinburgh International Film Festival - 'Doll & Em' - Photocall at Lyceum Theatre - Edinburgh, United Kingdom - Sunday 21st June 2015

Emily Mortimer, Ewan Mcgregor, Dolly Wells and Alessandro Nivola
Emily Mortimer, Ewan Mcgregor, Dolly Wells and Alessandro Nivola
Emily Mortimer, Ewan Mcgregor, Dolly Wells and Alessandro Nivola
Emily Mortimer, Ewan Mcgregor, Dolly Wells and Alessandro Nivola
Emily Mortimer, Ewan Mcgregor, Dolly Wells and Alessandro Nivola

Emily Mortimer and Alessandro Nivola - The Cartier Queen's Cup 2015 Polo Finals at Windsor Great Park - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 14th June 2015

Emily Mortimer and Alessandro Nivola

Emily Mortimer - Emily Mortimer outside ITV Studios - London, United Kingdom - Monday 8th June 2015

Emily Mortimer
Emily Mortimer
Emily Mortimer

Emily Mortimer - South Bank Sky Arts Awards held at the Savoy, arrivals. at South Bank - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 7th June 2015

Emily Mortimer
Emily Mortimer and Dolly Wells

Alessandro Nivola, Emily Mortimer and May Rose Nivola - Cast members from 'The Elephant Man' receive their portraits at Sardi's famous theatre district eatery. at Sardi's, - New York City, New York, United States - Thursday 2nd April 2015

Alessandro Nivola, Emily Mortimer and May Rose Nivola
Max Klimavicius and Alessandro Nivola
Max Klimavicius and Alessandro Nivola
Max Klimavicius and Alessandro Nivola
Alessandro Nivola
Alessandro Nivola

Emily Mortimer - The 87th Annual Oscars - Vanity Fair Oscar Party at Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts and The Beverly Hills City Hall - Arrivals at Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts, Oscars - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Sunday 22nd February 2015

Emily Mortimer
Alessandro Nivola and Emily Mortimer
Alessandro Nivola and Emily Mortimer
Emily Mortimer
Emily Mortimer

Emily Mortimer - The 87th Annual Oscars - Vanity Fair Oscar Party at Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts and The Beverly Hills City Hall - Arrivals at Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts, Oscars - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Monday 23rd February 2015

Emily Mortimer
Emily Mortimer
Emily Mortimer
Emily Mortimer
Alessandro Nivola and Emily Mortimer
Alessandro Nivola and Emily Mortimer

Alessandro Nivola and Emily Mortimer - A host of stars were photographed as they attended the Vanity Fair Oscar Party which was held at the Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts and The Beverly Hills City Hall in Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 22nd February 2015

Alessandro Nivola and Emily Mortimer
Alessandro Nivola
Alessandro Nivola

Emily Mortimer - InStyle Best of British Talent party in celebration of BAFTA, in association with Lancome and Sky Living held at Dartmouth House - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 4th February 2014

Emily Mortimer
Emily Mortimer

Emily Mortimer and Dolly Wells - Emily Mortimer and Dolly Wells outside the ITV Studios - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 5th February 2014

Emily Mortimer and Dolly Wells
Emily Mortimer and Dolly Wells
Emily Mortimer and Dolly Wells
Emily Mortimer and Dolly Wells
Emily Mortimer and Dolly Wells

Dolly Wells and Emily Mortimer - Sky Living original comedy TV preview for 'Doll & Em' held at the Princess Anne Theatre, BAFTA - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 4th February 2014

Dolly Wells and Emily Mortimer
Dolly Wells and Emily Mortimer

Emily Mortimer wearing Christopher Kane - The 66th Annual Writer's Guild Awards, held at the Edison Ballroom - Arrivals. - New York, New York, United States - Sunday 2nd February 2014

Emily Mortimer
Emily Mortimer and Alessandro Nivola
Emily Mortimer
Emily Mortimer
Emily Mortimer
Emily Mortimer

Emily Mortimer - Celebrities attend the 15th Annual Warner Bros And InStyle Golden Globe Awards After Party - Arrivals held at the Oasis Courtyard at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 12th January 2014

Emily Mortimer
Emily Mortimer and Alessandro Nivola
Emily Mortimer and Alessandro Nivola

Emily Mortimer - HBO Golden Globe Awards 2014 After Party held at Circa 55 - Red Carpet Arrivals - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Sunday 12th January 2014

Emily Mortimer
Emily Mortimer
Emily Mortimer

Harry Brown Trailer


Watch the trailer for Harry Brown

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The Pink Panther 2 Review


Terrible
Back in the fun, free-basing '70s, Steve Martin was a stand-up comic god. Me Decade audiences lined up for hours to see this one-man Beatles of absurdist humor. They bought his albums, memorized his skits -- even stayed up late to see him swing with groovy foxes as part of a then-relevant Saturday Night Live. Fast forward 30 years, and the formerly wild and crazy guy has decided to follow fellow SNL alum Eddie Murphy into the fetid family film arena. With a couple of Cheaper by the Dozens under his belt, Martin is now mangling the legacy of one of film's greatest comedy franchises. No matter how hard he tries, however, he can't completely kill the legacy of the Pink Panther. This unnecessary sequel does come awfully close, though.

When four of the world's most valuable artifacts -- the Magna Carta, the Shroud of Turin, the Royal Emperor's Sword, and France's famous Pink Panther diamond -- are stolen by master thief The Tornado, a dream team of detectives is assembled. They include British sleuth Pepperidge (Alfred Molina), Italian officer Vincenzo (Andy Garcia), Japanese tech expert Kenji (Yuki Matsuzaki), and of course, inspector Jacques Clouseau (Martin). Helped by Sonia (Aishwarya Rai), a special agent from India, and the French home team including Chief Inspector Dreyfus (John Cleese), Poton (Jean Reno), and political correctness liaison Mrs. Berenger (Lily Tomlin), all paths appear to lead to exiled art dealer Avellaneda (Jeremy Irons). But even in light of all the obvious evidence, Clouseau thinks he knows the identity of the real culprit.

Continue reading: The Pink Panther 2 Review

Transsiberian Review


Good
As the train rattles through the frozen tundra with its cargo of weary passengers, a melancholic detective gives the American tourists an idea of just how far into it they've stepped: "In Russia we have a saying, With lies you may go forward in the world, but you may never go back." To same extent, this is the Slavic equivalent of fortune cookie wisdom. Ah, Russia, with its apparently inexhaustible capacity for resigned suffering. But as presented here, in the context of a tight and terse thriller like Transsiberian, and coming out of the mouth of a particularly sharp Ben Kingsley, cynical bits of wisdom like that go down like an invigorating shot of chilled vodka.

In Brad Anderson's film, the scenario is one we've seen before, but it's handled here with an unusual alacrity. Woody Harrelson and Emily Mortimer play Roy and Jessie, a pair of young Americans who just finished a volunteering stint in China and are now taking the Trans-Siberian train all the way to Moscow. Both as comfortable in their roles as few actors are ever allowed to be, the two need little more than a handful of lines and a couple of telling looks to apprise viewers of their characters. As the good-natured Christian rube from Iowa, and the girl with a past who's looking to put it all behind her but doesn't trust herself to do so, the two are ripe for the plucking. So when a dark and sexy couple in black move into Roy and Jessie's cabin, it's all a question of time before the Americans find themselves in a situation they're less than prepared for.

Continue reading: Transsiberian Review

Redbelt Review


Excellent
David Mamet is a difficult guy to figure. His latest film, Redbelt, which he wrote and directed, is perhaps his most confounding project yet. That's not to say it's not enjoyable -- at its best, Redbelt is twisty, heady, butt-kicking fun -- but it's hard to recognize the writer of Glengarry Glen Ross as the man behind a film set in the mixed martial arts (MMA) subculture. Sure, the world of MMA fighting is fertile territory for Mamet's twin obsessions -- masculinity and domination -- but seriously... MMA? I've seen some MMA bouts in my day, and those guys don't look capable of speechifying the way Mamet's character's do. And yet somehow, in ways past reckoning, Redbelt manages to be pretty darn entertaining, even, in some parts, affecting.

Let me quickly establish some caveats. Redbelt is one of the most unapologetically macho movies made in the last several years, and the story ultimately buckles under the weight of its earnestness. The plot is constructed on the theme of warrior culture, personified by the lead character Mike Terry, played soulfully by Chiwetel Ejiofor (American Gangster, Dirty Pretty Things), who seems incapable of anything short of brilliance. Terry is a mixed martial arts instructor who lives his life by a code. His ethos is never really explained, but it clearly involves things like honor, integrity, and a bunch of other quiet, old-fashioned virtues most people don't think too much about. But Terry has a problem: Despite a loyal stable of disciples, his gym doesn't make any money and he has to do something to dig his way out of debt.

Continue reading: Redbelt Review

Chaos Theory Review


Very Good
When you take a film class, the first thing you're told is that if you can't capture the attention of your audience in the first five minutes, you will lose them for the duration of the narrative. For the most part, in practice, this is actually true. Think about the number of times you've waited for a film to get better and it simply hasn't, then you walk out of the theater lamenting the loss of those two hours of life.

In sharp contrast to this rule, Chaos Theory's first ten minutes are painful, followed by a moving journey that follows one couples' path to forgiveness after the realization of infidelity. The last few minutes mirror the beginning in their annoyingly simplistic banality, but the middle hour of the film is completely engaging. Even more impressive is that, though it is mainly Frank's (Ryan Reynolds) story, the separate actions of both he and his wife (Emily Mortimer) are treated as equally important in terms of how they impact their family unit. The chemistry between parents and child feel lived-in.

Continue reading: Chaos Theory Review

Lars And The Real Girl Review


OK
Lars and the Real Girl is not a comedy, despite the urge to laugh at a man who is romantically infatuated with his life-like sex doll. The title character is a socially maladjusted young man who doesn't speak much and can't stand being touched. But just like anyone else, he gets lonely. When the answer to his prayers arrives in a UPS box, he begins an emotional journey through his delusional relationship. Sure, it sounds like Farrelly brothers fodder, but director Craig Gillespie plays it straight -- for better and for worse.

Once the anatomically-correct doll arrives and Lars introduces it to his brother and his wife, the laughs dissipate as quickly as they arise. It's absurd for sure, Lars parading around a doll as a real person -- cutting up her meat at dinner and tucking her into bed at night -- but there is no over-acting nor subjective shots that would emphasize the ridiculousness. Instead, shaky, hand-held shots amp up the tension when Lars' brother and his wife are arguing in the kitchen over how to handle Lars and his new lover.

Continue reading: Lars And The Real Girl Review

Paris, Je T'aime Review


Good
One would like to think that there at least a few other cities in the world besides Paris that could have inspired a film as varied in the types of cinematic pleasure so ably delivered by the anthology piece Paris Je T'Aime -- but it seems unlikely. This isn't due to an unavailability of good stories or locations in many other great metropolises, but more because being able to dangle the possibility of shooting in Paris in front of the world's greatest directors is going to be so much more enticing. Also, there are few other cities besides Paris that come with such a powerful and multifarious wealth of preassociated images and emotions for both filmmaker and audience to both draw upon and react against. So what could have been a collection of short films with a few highs, several lows, and a lot of muddled in-betweens is in fact a remarkably and consistently imaginative body of work, practically giddy with energy, that only rarely touches the ground.

Project overseers Emmanuel Benbihy and Tristan Carné wanted to create a cinematic map of Paris, with each short film representing one of the city's 20 arrondissements (neighborhoods). They ended up with 18 films, none of them more than a few minutes long and directed by a glittering, international roster of filmmakers. While none of the films here are anything approaching masterpieces, hardly a one is in any way a chore to sit through, which has to be some sort of an accomplishment.

Continue reading: Paris, Je T'aime Review

The Pink Panther (2006) Review


Bad
ABC premiered America's Funniest Home Videos in 1989, and the weekly video-clip competition has gone on to become the network's longest-running comedy series. Amazingly, very little has changed since that debut show. Videos rides one predominant joke all the way to the finish line each week - people get hurt on camera, and audiences howl.

The full-contact humor propagated by the program obviously appeals to the masses. The simple formula has worked on Videos for 17 years now. So why, then, am I still surprised when a preview audience sitting through something as moronic as The Pink Panther bursts out laughing when a cyclist crashes into a car door or a senior citizen takes a blunt object to the skull?

Continue reading: The Pink Panther (2006) Review

Match Point Review


Extraordinary
I'm tired of apologizing for Woody Allen. I've rated his recent films higher than most critics. Not sure why, but I probably gave Celebrity a higher rating than anyone else who saw it. (There are, of course, exceptions to this.) I just like Allen's sensibility. He was Seinfeld before Seinfeld.

I like almost all Woody Allen movies: When he's in them, when he's not in them, when he's being funny, and when he's being serious. But aside from a couple of classic straight-up comedies -- Annie Hall and Hannah and Her Sisters -- Allen is at his very best when he's being slyly funny and deadly serious at the same time.

Continue reading: Match Point Review

The Sleeping Dictionary Review


OK
You say colonial epic, I say Alba. No, not Alda, as in Alan Alda. Alba. As in Jessica Alba. In a period piece! The title actually refers to Alba's character: She's a Sarawak (look it up) native, assigned to teach the British imperialist who comes to rule her village how to speak the native tongue. She does this through sleeping with him. You know, figuratively. Faster than you can say "forbidden love," this all turns nasty for all parties. I can't say much for the wandering storyline (which is all too reminiscent of everything from Original Sin to Wide Sargasso Sea), but the cinematography is stellar for a direct-to-DVD movie, and Alba has a really naked back.

Love's Labour's Lost Review


Good
Film musicals are a tough sell these days. It's either the annual Disney animation vehicle or it's Edward Norton dancing to swing music. I could probably count the last five years worth of decent musicals on my left hand. The juxtaposition of dialogue with song and dance always seems to remind me of the tragedies of my high school drama days. Those damn tights. The bad pancake makeup.

Kenneth Branagh's latest Shakespearean opus, Love's Labour's Lost, falls into the category of an ingenious experiment gone horrible wrong. Like a bartender with one too many vodka-tonics on his breath, Branagh mixes one of Shakespeare's lesser-known comedies with the music of Cole Porter and Irving Berlin and places everything in 1939 France. Think the Rat Pack in some bad 1960s film.

Continue reading: Love's Labour's Lost Review

Young Adam Review


Bad
"That was pointless," muttered a fellow critic after leaving a screening of Young Adam. Well, he's almost right. The only discernable purpose of the movie is to have Ewan McGregor's solemn, conscience-deprived drifter Joe screw every woman in sight. I was immediately reminded of interviews with James Spader around the time of David Cronenberg's remarkable Crash, where he described his proactive role in the casting process because he gets to have simulated sex with each of his female co-stars. If that seems a shallow way of viewing this adaptation of Alexander Trocchi's celebrated beat novel (which has earned comparisons with Albert Camus's The Stranger), well, this is a pretty shallow movie from the word go. The images feel flat, the dialogue literary, and the performances strong but non-captivating.

Joe works a barge between Glasgow and Edinburgh, working for grouchy middle-aged public servant Les (Peter Mullan) and his miserable wife Ella (Tilda Swinton). Shortly after they discover a dead body floating in the water, Joe and Ella begin a torrid affair right under Les's nose. Much like the Jack Nicholson-Jessica Lange version of The Postman Always Rings Twice, this film adaptation keeps all the fleshy sex scenes front-and-center while losing the moral confusion and dark side of cultural idealism that can't be captured onscreen via Ewan McGregor's endless brooding and cigarette smoking and arid shots of Joe against industrial backdrops.

Continue reading: Young Adam Review

Lovely & Amazing Review


Extraordinary
Lovely & Amazing, Nicole Holofcener's follow-up to her feature debut Walking And Talking, doesn't quite rank with suburban classics like Ordinary People and American Beauty -- it never takes itself quite seriously enough for that; but it has the right makings for a memorable movie experience. Simple, sweet, and direct, this sensational portrait of engaging characters ranks as one of the year's best movies to date.

The film observes the daily rituals of four hapless but elastic women as they struggle with various demands of their eventful lives. While most movies would become lost in the complicated world of these spontaneous situations, Lovely & Amazing simply observes as the characters deal with thought-provoking issues involving relationships, health, age, romance, and work.

Continue reading: Lovely & Amazing Review

Dear Frankie Review


Very Good
Dear Frankie is a good movie stuck inside of a great story. Frankie is a nine-year-old boy (Jack McElhone) with one great joy in his life: corresponding with his father, a naval petty officer. The letters have defined and improved his life. Deaf, he barely speaks. In his letters he reads in a gentle, confident Scottish brogue. He devours books on marine life; a large map of his father's travels dominates his bedroom; and he declines fish with his chips. Though he's sick of moving, this town is different. It's by the sea.

In truth, Frankie's father is in Scotland, gravely ill. His life at sea was concocted by Frankie's mother, Lizzie (Emily Mortimer of Dirty Pretty Things), to keep the real, landlocked father out of their lives. We don't know much about Frankie's dad, only that he caused the boy's deafness and is so despicable that Lizzie, her mother, and Frankie raise stakes frequently to maintain their distance.

Continue reading: Dear Frankie Review

Formula 51 Review


Weak
If you were suffering from a nasty cold, would you settle for a less-than-soft, generic tissue to soothe your chapped snout, or would you pay a little more to get the plusher brand name? Of course, nothing beats the real thing! Formula 51 is like that sub-standard nose rag - it's just an artificial substitute for a much better British action-comedy.

The plot is loosely framed around the kilt-wearing master chemist Elmo McElroy (Samuel L. Jackson) who has developed a new illegal drug that produces a high that is 51 times better than cocaine, acid, or ecstasy. When McElroy attempts to sell the drug's formula to a mobster named The Lizard (Meat Loaf), the deal goes bad and McElroy flees to Liverpool with only his golf clubs. While there, he meets up with Yankee-hating thug Felix DeSouza (Robert Carlyle) assigned to help McElroy score $20 million for the drugs from a local gangster (Ricky Tomlinson). Unfortunately, this deal also fails. DeSouza and McElroy must now find new buyers while staying clear of other rogue groups who want the formula, and an assassin (Emily Mortimer) hired by The Lizard to return McElroy to the states.

Continue reading: Formula 51 Review

Bright Young Things Review


OK
Bright Young Things arrives at an ideal time. Focusing on a group of twentysomething socialites having a frolicking good time in 1930s London, while the press hungers for every detail, it capitalizes on the current media's fascination with idiot VIPs like the Hilton sisters and Bijou Phillips. For some, Bright Young Things could also serve as a sunnier alternative to the gloomy young things in Garden State, Natalie Portman excluded.

It's OK to have fun in your twenties, and in Bright Young Things, the characters have plenty of it. They attend lavish costume parties that scream of good times and well-funded debauchery, do cocaine like Rick James in 1979 and take trips to the countryside, all the while exchanging quips. At its best, the movie resembles a far more literate, sophisticated version of an episode of the E! True Hollywood Story.

Continue reading: Bright Young Things Review

Howl's Moving Castle Review


Very Good
Similar to Princess Mononoke and Spirited Away, Hayao Miyazaki's Howl's Moving Castle is a sumptuously illustrated fairy tale with a pro-environment and anti-war slant, though unlike those modern classics, the animé titan's latest suffers from a narrative confusion that bogs down its initially effervescent spirit. A gloriously animated fantasia blessed by familiar Miyazaki hallmarks - vibrant, ethereal artwork, whimsical creatures, a rural world in which mysticism and technology happily coexist - the film (being released in both subtitled and dubbed versions, the latter of which I saw) has a light aura of juvenile romanticism and a manic, tangible physicality that stands head and shoulders above anything previously crafted by the maestros at Japan's legendary Studio Ghibli (including Katsuhiro Otomo's recent Steamboy).

The story of a young girl who, after being changed into an elderly woman by an evil witch, joins forces with a petulant playboy wizard against a nefarious sorcerer, Howl's is akin to a cluttered, cacophonous childhood dream come to life. However, as with dreams, Miyazaki's film is also far-too-often a bewildering jumble of intriguing ideas and ingenious images that never fully coalesce into a moving or compelling whole.

Continue reading: Howl's Moving Castle Review

Scream 3 Review


Very Good
Normally, as a critic, we are exempt from the cost of seeing a movie. Normally, we get in for absolute zero when we attend a press screener of a film. However, since Dimension, for what appear to be highly mysterious (and controversial) reasons, cancelled the screener of Scream 3 I had to pay.

This is one movie that I did not waste my money on.

Continue reading: Scream 3 Review

Howl's Moving Castle Review


Excellent
Hayao Miyazaki's new film "Howl's Moving Castle"is so good that it shames virtually every animated film made since Miyazaki'slast, "SpiritedAway," graced movie screens in 2002.

If nothing else, it proves to Hollywood that its recentfailure in the animated realm comes not from old-fashioned hand-drawn animationbut from its severe lack of imagination and over-reliance on fart jokesand pop culture references.

The first of Miyazaki's films to be based on a book, "Howl'sMoving Castle" quickly establishes itself with the director's personalsignature, bursting with enough ideas and imagination to make up half adozen summer movies.

It begins, as most of his stories do, with a shy younggirl, Sophie (voiced for this English-language version by Emily Mortimer).She works in a hat shop and humbly watches as life passes her by. But oneday a handsome fellow -- whom she will come to know as Master Howl (voicedby Christian Bale) -- rescues her from an alleyway altercation and accidentallysteers her into all-new problems, involving several ghostly, globular thingswearing porkpie hats.

Continue reading: Howl's Moving Castle Review

Formula 51 Review


Weak

The title of "Formula 51," couldn't be more appropriate for this perfunctory action-comedy, seeing as its cobbled together from at least that many formulaic plot points, formulaic action sequences, formulaic catch phrases, formulaic jokes and suffers from formulaic casting.

Samuel L. Jackson recycles his stock bad-ass persona for his starring role as a kilt-wearing, golf-playing, corn-row-sporting disgraced pharmacologist named Elmo, who has created a new rave drug that's allegedly "51 times stronger than cocaine, 51 times more hallucinogenic than acid, and 51 times more explosive than ecstasy."

After double-crossing his drug kingpin boss (Meat Loaf in a completely inept bad-guy performance), he's off to England to sell the concoction's chemistry to a higher bidder. But complications arise in the form of traitorous partners, crooked cops and a sweetly sexy assassin on his trail, all of which lead to many stale, hackneyed car chases and shootouts.

Continue reading: Formula 51 Review

Lovely & Amazing Review


Weak

In the 1996 modest and little-seen relationship comedy delight "Walking and Talking," writer-director Nicole Holofcener demonstrated a preternatural knack for capturing the bonds between women with her candid and vicarious style of emotion honesty and funny, true-to-life dialogue. But her second independent film, "Lovely and Amazing," fails to find the same spark as it eavesdrops on a family of gratingly neurotic and insecure women.

Sad-eyed Brenda Blethyn, a specialist at screwed-up moms ("Little Voice," "Secrets and Lies"), is the emotionally messy matriarch, who spends most of the movie in the hospital due to complications from liposuction surgery. Doped up on painkillers and more depressed than usual (in part because her flirtations with her plastic surgeon aren't getting anywhere), she still has complaints about her daughters at the ready.

"One's really f**ked up," she tells the doctor, "and the other one isn't married."

Continue reading: Lovely & Amazing Review

Scream 3 Review


Weak

The minute Kevin Williamson said no to writing "Scream 3," that should have been the end of it. The only thing that made "Scream" special in the first place was the writer's dark, self-aware wit regarding the conventions of the cheesy teen horror genre.

But then, Williamson had already run out of steam when he wrote the series' second installment, which was little more than an unnecessarily convoluted, workaday slasher flick with a couple well-placed sardonic remarks.

Continuing the decline, now comes "Scream 3," which Wes Craven -- the director of the whole series -- swears will be the last one. Good thing, too.

Continue reading: Scream 3 Review

Bright Young Things Review


Very Good

"Bright Young Things" is a terribly witty romp through 1930s pre-war London with a pack of idle young swells who live scrumptious but superficial lives of joyous gossip-page decadence and complacent scandal that has the potential to ruin them.

Very cleverly adapted (from Evelyn Waugh's novel "Vile Bodies") and directed by the gifted comedic actor Stephen Fry ("Wilde," "Peter's Friends"), our surrogate in this world is Adam Symes (newcomer Stephen Campbell Moore), a well-connected but flat broke novelist and fringe member of this society who is railroaded into writing an anonymous gossip column about his pals -- although he's soon inventing entirely fictional members of the circle just to keep his readers amused.

An ironic failure at schemes to get rich quick so he can ask the "frantically bored" and beautiful but secretly vulnerable and melancholy Nina (subtly heartbreaking and simply wonderful Emily Mortimer) to marry him, Adam's fortunes -- which practically fluctuate with the tides -- are just one source of endless humor. But director Fry furtively hints at shades of compunction and misfortune under the film's carefree surface that bubble up as world events encroach on these lives of leisure, eventually taking the film to an unexpected level of empathy, nuance and humanity.

Continue reading: Bright Young Things Review

Young Adam Review


Weak

The unimpeachable talents of Ewan McGregor, Tilda Swinton, Peter Mullan and Emily Mortimer go for naught in "Young Adam," a film of dark, disenchanting characters who tread water in moral ambiguity for 98 minutes.

McGregor plays Joe, a nebulous, failed beatnik writer who has deliberately dropped off the face of the earth by taking a grimy, hard-labor job, working (and living) on a cramped little coal barge that travels the shallow, narrow backwater canals of 1950s Glasgow. Vacant of disposition and void of moral fiber, he's become both a reluctant drinking buddy to his boss Les (Mullan, "Session 9") and an opportunistic lover to the boss's weary, vinegary wife Ella (Swinton, "The Deep End"), which soon upends all their lives.

Proving he hasn't abandoned his provocative sensibilities to Hollywood, McGregor makes Joe's soulless impalpability curiously absorbing in a performance full of furtive nuance and vague instability -- the signs of which grow as he finds a young woman's dead body in the water and director David Mackenzie slowly reveals that his protagonist may have had something to do with how she got there in the first place.

Continue reading: Young Adam Review

Emily Mortimer

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Emily Mortimer Movies

The Party Movie Review

The Party Movie Review

Comedies don't get much darker than this pitch-black British movie, written and directed by Sally...

The Sense of an Ending Movie Review

The Sense of an Ending Movie Review

Julian Barnes' Booker Prize-winning novel is adapted into a remarkably intelligent, gently involving film anchored...

The Sense Of An Ending Trailer

The Sense Of An Ending Trailer

Tony Webster is a retired man in his sixties whose past comes back to haunt...

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10,000 Saints Trailer

10,000 Saints Trailer

Jude gets the surprise of his life when his biological father Les shows up at...

Hugo Movie Review

Hugo Movie Review

Based on the Brian Selznick novel The Invention of Hugo Cabret, Scorsese's first family movie...

Hugo Trailer

Hugo Trailer

Hugo is a twelve year old boy who lives in Paris and loves mysteries. One...

Cars 2 Movie Review

Cars 2 Movie Review

There's an astounding level of detail in the animation of this sequel to Pixar's iffy...

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Cars 2 Trailer

Cars 2 Trailer

Lightning McQueen knows he's the best and fastest race car in the world and when...

City Island Movie Review

City Island Movie Review

This drama feels a little contrived due to the sheer number of issues faced by...

City Island Trailer

City Island Trailer

Occasionally even close families keep secrets from one and other, the small white lies that...

Shutter Island Movie Review

Shutter Island Movie Review

Essentially a B-movie thriller with an A-list cast and production values (and an epic's running...

Shutter Island Trailer

Shutter Island Trailer

Watch the trailer for Shutter Island In the 1950's mental patients were incarcerated in some...

Harry Brown Trailer

Harry Brown Trailer

Watch the trailer for Harry Brown If you're a pensioner and live in a rough...

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