Emilie De Ravin

Emilie De Ravin

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The TMA 2015 Heller Awards

Emilie De Ravin - The TMA 2015 Heller Awards at Hyatt Regency Century Plaza - Century City, California, United States - Thursday 28th May 2015

Emilie de Ravin
Emilie de Ravin
Emilie de Ravin
Emilie de Ravin
Emilie de Ravin

2015 G'DAY USA Gala featuring the AACTA International Awards

Emilie De Ravin - 2015 G'DAY USA Gala featuring the AACTA International Awards presented by Qantas at Hollywood Palladium - Arrivals at Hollywood Palladium - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 31st January 2015

Emilie de Ravin
Emilie de Ravin
Emilie de Ravin

Season 4 premiere of ABC's 'Once Upon A Time'

Emilie De Ravin - Photos from the El Capitan Theater as many stars attended the Season 4 premiere of ABC's American fairy tale drama 'Once Upon A Time' in Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 21st September 2014

Emilie de Ravin
Emilie de Ravin
Emilie de Ravin
Emilie de Ravin
Emilie de Ravin

Disney Media Networks International Upfronts

Emilie De Ravin - Disney Media Networks International Upfronts held at The Walt Disney Studios Lot - Arrivals - Burbank, California, United States - Sunday 19th May 2013

Emilie de Ravin
Emilie de Ravin
Emilie de Ravin
Emilie de Ravin
Emilie de Ravin

PaleyFest 2013

Emilie De Ravin - The Paley Center For Media's PaleyFest 2013 honoring 'Once Upon A Time' at The Saban Theater - Outside Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 3rd March 2013

Emilie de Ravin

Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole Trailer


The Guardians of Ga'Hoole are sworn to protect the innocent from trouble and vanquish evil. Soren is a young owl who's grown up listening to his father tell the stories of The Gaurdians. His dream is to one day join his heroes and be a part of that noble life he's learnt so much about.

Continue: Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole Trailer

The Perfect Game Trailer


The Perfect Game is based on a true story about 9 young boys from Monterrey, Mexico who have a dream to compete in the Little League World Series. Angel Macias is the teams pitcher and is taken under the wing of Cesar Faz, a man who used to work as a janitor for St. Louis Cardinals baseball team, he tells Angel what he thinks to be a little white lie, he tells him he used to coach the Cardinals. After learning of his new heroes past, it doesn't take long for Angel to ask Cesar to coach Monterrey's first Little League team. The boys might be a little rag-tag but their passion wins through as they not only win the chance to go to America to play ball, the boys also surpass everyone's expectations and reach the little league finals!

Continue: The Perfect Game Trailer

Remember Me Review


Grim
Even before the manipulative final act, this film will get on the nerves of most viewers with its over-serious tone and sentimentalised plot. And the main problem is that all of this leaves the cast with little to do besides mope.

Tyler (Pattinson) is a 21-year-old student who still hasn't recovered from the suicide of his big brother six years ago. He devotes himself to his little sister Caroline (Jerins) and rebels against their wealthy father (Brosnan). When he's brutally arrested by a cop (Cooper), his chucklehead flatmate (Ellington) suggests that he get even by dating the cop's daughter Ally (de Ravin), a fellow student. It turns out that Ally also has a personal tragedy in her life, and of course they fall in love as they try to sort out their issues.

Continue reading: Remember Me Review

Remember Me Trailer


Watch the trailer for Remember Me

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Public Enemies Trailer


Watch the trailer for Public Enemies.

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Brick Review


Good
It doesn't take long to notice that Brick is a film that feels entirely fresh and new. It hits you rather suddenly, a few minutes after the movie begins: Why are teenagers talking like they came out of a Dashiell Hammett novel?

That's the rub, folks: Brick, as best as you can describe it, is a postmodern mashup of a '90s teen drug drama and a '30s noir. The setup is quite straightforward: A girl named Emily (Emilie de Ravin) is dead, and her ex-boyfriend Brendan (Joseph Gordon-Levitt, who apparently can't get enough of the indie scene now) wants to find out what happened. He suspects foul play, and he launches an investigation, much like some renegade gumshoe might do, always evading the watchful eye of the chief. Only here, there's no chief, just a principal (Richard Roundtree, of all people). With the help of a brilliant colleague -- er, classmate -- Brendan starts digging into the underworld, such as it exists in a world of letter jackets and parking lot brawls. (Indeed, for all the talk of highschool, not a single class is actually attended in Brick.)

Continue reading: Brick Review

The Hills Have Eyes (2006) Review


Good
The Hills Have Eyes is a truly American horror film. Like Manifest Destiny gone horribly awry, the film reflects our obsession with the danger of the West: Its forbidden, desolate landscapes, the rugged masochism it inspires. For Americans, the West is a place where anything can and does happen. And in The Hills Have Eyes our nastiest nightmares are bloodily realized.

Wes Craven's brutal 1977 micro-budgeted The Hills Have Eyes was a post-hippie scream of horror, both at the collapse of the youth-led revolution and the dreadfulness of the Vietnam War. Craven turned his eye to home, to the desolate stretches of vast American desert where he could posit a family of bloodthirsty mutants preying on those who stumble onto their fallout abode, and it could almost (almost) seem plausible. With a world of misery at large, how strange would it be to find murderous maniacs in our own backyard? Sure, the original film suffers from some notably outré moments and jagged pacing, but Craven succeeded in bringing a grimly gleeful sense of humor to what was essentially a Texas Chainsaw Massacre riff.

Continue reading: The Hills Have Eyes (2006) Review

Lost: Season One Review


Grim
Agatha Christie wrote something in excess of 80 novels. Christie was a practiced and a brilliant mystery taleteller, a commercial writer who exploited her full and total grasp of the mystery genre to massive popular success. Each plot was intricately realized, no facet of the mystery introduced that could not be resolved. Such is the enjoyment of good mysteries: a confidence that although clues and complications have confused us for now, in the end the equation will make sense. We should not know the ending, but it should not be impossible to work out. Lost, 2004's hit about a group of plane-wreck survivors milling about on a mysterious island, crashes and burns on its inability to handle the genre Christie had mastered. Not so much a whodunit as a "whatisit," Lost never seems confident that it can provide the answers to the questions it asks.

Before triangulating the discombobulating mystery that anchors Lost's first 24 episodes, it is necessary to acknowledge the brilliance of the program's premise. An aircraft traveling from Sydney to L.A. crashes, and part of the plane lands on an island somewhere in the South Pacific. Several survivors emerge from the wreckage to take pole positions as the show's cast, and slowly but surely, as some semblance of society is established, we get flashbacks into their previous mainland lives. This design leads to situations such as this: Jack (Matthew Fox) is falling for Kate (Evangeline Lilly). However, as dramatic irony would have it, the viewers know that Kate was actually a gun-wielding fugitive in her pre-island life. Watch out, Jack! This conceit of letting the audience in on the characters' secrets while they mingle obliviously with each other is Lost's greatest power. Nevertheless, creator J.J. Abrams was not content with just that.

Continue reading: Lost: Season One Review

Emilie De Ravin

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