Elsa Zylberstein

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Gemma Bovery Trailer


Martin Joubert is a French baker living in Normandy who has a deep passion for the writer Gustave Flaubert and his masterpiece novel 'Madame Bovary', which takes place in the same town in which he lives. Soon he meets an English couple who have moved over to France to begin a new life, and of course their names are Charlie and Gemma Bovery. Joubert immediately senses oncoming disaster, especially when he notices problems in the couple's relationship. Gemma is an artist who, upon her arrival, is enlisted to help another English couple with some design work, and as fate would have it they introduce her to Patrick - who happens to be her former lover. Joubert watches as Gemma and Patrick begin an illicit affair and predicts that this is another story that's bound to end in tragedy, no matter what he does to try and stop it.

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68th Annual Cannes Film Festival - 'Carol' - Premiere

Eva Longoria and Elsa Zylberstein - A variety of celebrities were photographed as they took to the red carpet at the 68th Annual Cannes Film Festival for the 'Carol' premiere in Cannes, France - Sunday 17th May 2015

Eva Longoria
Eva Longoria
Eva Longoria
Eva Longoria
Eva Longoria

Cannes Film Festival - 'Two Days, One Night' (Deux Jours, Une Nuit) - Premiere

Elsa Zylberstein - The 67th Annual Cannes Film Festival - 'Two Days, One Night' (Deux Jours, Une Nuit) - Premiere - Cannes, France - Tuesday 20th May 2014

Elsa Zylberstein

Only God Forgives - premiere

Elsa Zylberstein - 66th Cannes Film Festival - Only God Forgives - premiere - Cannes, France - Wednesday 22nd May 2013

Elsa Zylberstein
Elsa Zylberstein

The Consul General Of France, Mr. Axel Cruau, Honours The French Nominees

Elsa Zylberstein - The Consul General Of France, Mr. Axel Cruau, Honours The French Nominees for the 85th Annual Academy Awards - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Monday 25th February 2013

Elsa Zylberstein
Elsa Zylberstein

I've Loved You So Long Review


Weak
Novelist-turned-filmmaker Philippe Claudel's debut film, I've Loved You So Long, is a character study in the very strictest of terms. That is to say that almost everything in the film, from composition to narrative arc to dialogue, is contingent on a central character. For an old hand like, say, Mike Leigh, the style allows for some focus on tone and performance. It affords the same pleasantries for Claudel, but it also reveals the first-time director's shortcomings.

Claudel's head character is one of immediate mystery. Juliette (Kristin Scott Thomas) sits at an airport smoking a cigarette, waiting for something, anything. Her sister Lea (Elsa Zylberstein) appears and greets her enthusiastically, even as Juliette keeps her cold composure. She begins to connect with her nieces, immediately threatens her brother-in-law Luc (Serge Hazanavicius) and makes friendly with Luc's father (Jean-Claude Arnaud). Her delicate mood even permeates a patient relationship with Lea's colleague Michel (the reliably-great Laurent Grévill).

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Van Gogh Review


Good
Would you believe that Vincent Van Gogh, the character, has appeared in at least 40 movies and TV shows? He's been played by everyone ranging from Kirk Douglas to Andy Dick.

This time out it's French singer-composer-actor Jacques Dutronc's turn to play the troubled master artist, recreating the final two months of Van Gogh's life, a feat which earned him the Cesar Award.

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Portraits Chinois Review


OK
Think of it as French Friends, the movie. A gaggle of Parisians, led by Carter and Bohringer as two fashion designers, experience love, loss, and raucous comedy -- at least when the subtitles are legible. The characters are too difficult to distinguish from one another, as well, and only Carter stands out as any different from her companions. Rather droll, but very Frahnch, oui oui!

Metroland Review


OK
Metroland: a gritty post-modern thriller in the tradition of Blade Runner? Not quite. Metroland is actually a suburb of London, where Bale's character is questioning his life decision to marry Watson, after old friend and hedonist Ross shows up in town. Most of his anguish comes in the form of nostalgia over wild French ex-girlfriend Zylberstein, and rightly so. Dumping her for Watson was indeed a really, really stupid thing to do.

Three Blind Mice Review


Grim
What the title Three Blind Mice has to do with a movie about a serial killer and webcams is beyond me, but I'm not losing any sleep thinking about it. This Edward Furlong vehicle is a poor film at best, and its odd title is the least of its problems.

The story introduces us to Thomas Cross (Furlong), who is obsessed with Internet webcams (so 1999!). One night, he witnesses his favorite gal Cathy as she is murdered while she's preparing dinner in her apartment. Yipes! The dinner preparation isn't so exciting (though Thomas is enthralled by it), but that murder certainly wakes him up. Too bad he doesn't really know where she lives, just her web URL, which the cops don't really grab on to.

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Modigliani Review


Weak
Despite great talent, fame and fortune eluded the Italian artist Amedeo Modigliani during his brief life. A drunkard and a drug addict, Modigliani lived in squalor and died a relatively obscure figure of the Paris art scene of the early 20th century. Now, more than 80 years after his death, with a single one of his portraits recently fetching $8 million, Modigliani has finally achieved the ne plus ultra of artistic success: He is the subject of a feature film, writer-director Mick Davis's aptly titled Modigliani.

After a brief prelude, the film picks up Modigliani's story in 1919, the year before his death, at a time when modern art was flourishing in Paris. Artists such as Pablo Picasso, Diego Rivera, and Jean Cocteau haunted the cafes at night as their fame and influence spread over the globe. It is here, in a café, where Modigliani (Andy Garcia) makes his entrance, drunkenly hopping onto a table and publicly ridiculing Picasso with the question, "How do you make love to a cube?"

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Monsieur N. Review


Terrible
No movie to my mind has made such a disaster of the voiceover device as Antoine de Caunes' Monsieur N. In fact, the movie should be cited in Screenwriting 101 courses as an example of how, when in the service of a poorly conceived story, the voiceover can become a go-to device for filling in expository and emotional nuances that the script fails to convey. The voiceover in Monsieur N. belongs to a young British aide-de-camp, Basil Heathcote (Jay Rodan), who is assigned to monitor Napoleon's (Philippe Torreton) daily activities during the latter's imprisonment on St. Helena between 1815 and 1821, the year Napoleon supposedly died. Manzor intersperses the script with Heathcote's voiceover, favoring his intimate impressions without sufficiently fleshing him out as a character or developing any sense of why he particularly matters. In director Antoine de Caunes' fidgety hands, what is meant to be a suspenseful lark into historical revisionism quickly becomes an earnest and thudding bore.

Manzor's script grafts upon this movie a Citizen Kane-type structure as it shunts us between the occasion of Napoleon's exhumation in Paris in 1840 and 20 years earlier, during Napoleon's island imprisonment. Upon his exhumation, the question is raised of how Napoleon died -- from an ulcer or slow poisoning? -- and whether Napoleon died at all -- or, as rumor has it, he foisted his butler Cipriani's body in place of his own and escaped to an anonymous life elsewhere. To find out, Heathcote questions Napoleon's mistress, Albine (Elsa Zylberstein), and the few officers who attended to him on St. Helena, as well as the British governor, Hudson Lowe (Richard E. Grant), once in charge of Napoleon's imprisonment and now reduced to an aging and disgraced wreck. Their reflections -- alternately wistful and caustic -- cue us to extended flashbacks of those island years and of Napoleon's shrewdly enigmatic persona. There is also the question of Betsy Balcombe (Siobhan Hewlett), an English merchant's daughter on St. Helena with whom Napoleon has an affair -- much to Albine's chagrin and Heathcote's too, for we're meant to believe that Heathcote's also smitten with her. But his gambit, at one point, to express his feelings to her is laughable, because it's such an obvious ploy by Manzor to bring his character to some turn-of-fate, having arrived here using voiceovers as a shortcut device and never treading the hard road of character development to earn his way.

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Metroland Review


Grim

I was debating a friend a couple days ago who wonderedaloud why no one makes movies about platonic friends.

I said, "Who would want to see a movie about a guybeing told 'Let's be just friends'?"

A similar question could be posed regarding "Metrola=nd":Who would want to see a movie about being complacent and content in suburbia?

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Time Regained Review


Terrible

For the sake of perspective, this review should begin with a confession: Your critic knows little of Proust. I haven't read any Proust. Most quotes I've heard from the deeply philosophical writer have come from the mouths of people so full of themselves that the words went in one ear and out the other out of disdain for the speaker. I admit it, I'm an ignoramus on this front.

So as you come to realize that I didn't much care for "Time Regained," the French film adaptation of Marcel Proust's last novel, feel free to draw the conclusion that I haven't the slightest idea what I'm talking about.

What little I do know of Proust, however, leads me to believe if the man were alive today he would scoff at the idea that the deliberate formlessness of "Time" could successfully be adapted to film.

Continue reading: Time Regained Review

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