Elizabeth Mitchell

Elizabeth Mitchell

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2013 NBC Upfront Presentation

Elizabeth Mitchell - 2013 NBC Upfront Presentation - Arrivals - New York City, New York, United States - Monday 13th May 2013

Elizabeth Mitchell
Elizabeth Mitchell
Tracy Spiridakos, Billy Burke, Giancarlo Esposito and Elizabeth Mitchell
Elizabeth Mitchell
Elizabeth Mitchell

NBC Universal's '2013 Winter TCA Tour' Day 1 at Langham Hotel

Elizabeth Mitchell Pasadena, California, United States NBC Universal's '2013 Winter TCA Tour' Day 1 at Langham Hotel Sunday 6th January 2013

Elizabeth Mitchell

NBC Universal's '2013 Winter TCA Tour' Day 1 at Langham Hotel

Elizabeth Mitchell Pasadena, California, United States NBC Universal's '2013 Winter TCA Tour' Day 1 at Langham Hotel Saturday 5th January 2013

Elizabeth Mitchell
Elizabeth Mitchell
Elizabeth Mitchell

Island Review


OK
Dark and atmospheric, this film is worth seeing just for the way it continually pushes us around emotionally. Although the plot never quite comes into clear focus, and it refuses to let us engage with the characters.

While working on a human geography project as part of her studies, Nikki (Press) travels to an isolated Scottish island and presents herself as a prospective tenant at isolated house owned by her birth mother Phyllis (McTeer), who doesn't recognise her. As she plots her revenge against the woman who abandoned her, she's surprised to discover that she has a brother, Calum (Morgan). But her continual questions about their husband-father are blanked, and life on the island becomes increasingly intriguing as she seeks answers about her past.

Continue reading: Island Review

visits the Hard Rock Cafe

Elizabeth Mitchell Sunday 25th July 2010 visits the Hard Rock Cafe San Diego, California

The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause Review


Grim
Of the many things I dislike about the Santa Clause series, the one that bothers me the most, the very very most, is this: Now, whenever any of the critics on this site tries to write the name "Santa Claus" they almost invariably spell it "Santa Clause." That extra "e" is absolutely maddening, and it is everywhere I look, unintentionally.

Against all odds, the e-happy Santa Clause series is back with a third installment, which involves Santa (Tim Allen) facing off against the Napoleon-complexed Jack Frost (Martin Short), who's got his eyes on the prize of being the supremo wintertime icon. His idea is to take advantage of a rare "escape clause" which lets Santa step down willingly if he says a certain phrase, so Frost can sieze the big red suit. Naturally, trickery is involved. Apparently Jack Frost is a very bad boy. You can tell by the fright wig hairdo.

Continue reading: The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause Review

The Santa Clause 2 Review


OK
Eight years ago, Scott Calvin (Tim Allen) inadvertently caused the death of Santa Claus. Ever since, he's been wearing the bright red suit himself, delivering countless toys to millions of children all over the world on one special night a year. This Christmas, however, things aren't going as smoothly for Santa, because he hasn't yet fulfilled an important part of his contract...the part about a Mrs. Claus. Calvin must find a wife before Christmas Eve, because if he doesn't, his duties as the head Claus will vanish forever!

Apart from the North Pole, much has changed since the original Santa Clause. Calvin's son, Charlie (Eric Lloyd), has become an embittered teenager who rebels against society by spraying graffiti on the walls of his school. Charlie's mother and stepfather (Wendy Crewson and Judge Reinhold), blame his misbehavior on Calvin's absence, but Principal Newman (Elizabeth Mitchell) doesn't care about the reasons behind the misbehavior, she just wants it to stop.

Continue reading: The Santa Clause 2 Review

Frequency Review


Extraordinary
The time travel/time bending genre always seems worn out. The very topic lends itself to the production of hacky movies like Millennium, and yet I am constantly surprised to see one film after another making good on the hidden promise of the genre. Witness the Back to the Future series and the powerful 12 Monkeys. As it turns out, mucking with time actually pays off more often than not!

Not only is Frequency a good flick, it's fully worthy of a place among one of the best timetwisters ever made.

Continue reading: Frequency Review

Molly Review


Terrible
Decidedly dumb, this ripoff of Flowers for Algernon has Elisabeth Shue playing the unlikely autism victim who miraculously gains intelligence and bionic powers like super-hearing after an experimental operation -- only to see said powers fade away over time. Shue's acting is atrocious, rivaled only by the idiocy of the story itself. See also At First Sight.

Double Bang Review


Weak
It's double the Baldwins and Double the Bang in this insanely great direct-to-video flick!

Er, well, would you believe it's not that bad? Now that your expectations are appropriately middling, you might be able to appreciate Double Bang, a reasonably entertaining cop drama about an NYPD officer (William Baldwin) who gets all upset when he crooked partner (Adam Baldwin) ends up dead. Billy heads out on a vigilante mission, interrogating the usual suspects and dishing out his own brand of justice by turning the bad guys against their own.

Continue reading: Double Bang Review

The Santa Clause 2 Review


OK
Eight years ago, Scott Calvin (Tim Allen) inadvertently caused the death of Santa Claus. Ever since, he's been wearing the bright red suit himself, delivering countless toys to millions of children all over the world on one special night a year. This Christmas, however, things aren't going as smoothly for Santa, because he hasn't yet fulfilled an important part of his contract...the part about a Mrs. Claus. Calvin must find a wife before Christmas Eve, because if he doesn't, his duties as the head Claus will vanish forever!

Apart from the North Pole, much has changed since the original Santa Clause. Calvin's son, Charlie (Eric Lloyd), has become an embittered teenager who rebels against society by spraying graffiti on the walls of his school. Charlie's mother and stepfather (Wendy Crewson and Judge Reinhold), blame his misbehavior on Calvin's absence, but Principal Newman (Elizabeth Mitchell) doesn't care about the reasons behind the misbehavior, she just wants it to stop.

Continue reading: The Santa Clause 2 Review

Gia Review


OK
Model goes bad, kills herself on drugs and the diseases that come with them. If you can muster some pity for poor Gia Carangi, a 1970s supermodel who died of AIDS at age 26, you'll enjoy Gia. Mainly, it's because of Jolie and her prodigious acting talents, even though she does come across as a bit cold. Overall, this is fine made-for-cable filmmaking, though it's hardly world-class.

Nurse Betty Review


OK

Heretofore known for his viciously incisive, very black socio-sexual satires, director Neil LaBute takes a joyride in antic comedy territory with "Nurse Betty." It's charming effort of pure entertainment about a gentle, bouncy Kansas waitress who becomes convinced she's a part of her favorite soap opera after being sent into post-traumatic shock by witnessing a murder.

The murder was that of her abusive, redneck husband (LaBute regular Aaron Eckhart in another amazing chameleon performance) -- a retribution for a shady business deal gone wrong.

The waitress, Betty Sizemore, is the kind of bona fide wide-eyed innocent most Hollywood actresses wouldn't be able to play without slipping into a hammy, ignorant hayseed routine and winking ironically at the audience. But in the hands of Renée Zellweger -- who proved her sweetheart credibility in "Jerry Maguire" -- Betty is 100 percent genuine sugar.

Continue reading: Nurse Betty Review

The Santa Clause 2 Review


Weak

At least one of the seven credited writers of the sequel-for-sequel's-sake holiday kiddie flick "The Santa Clause 2" clearly felt obliged to try to remedy the picture's contemptibly contrived premise by writing some really funny dialogue. And at least for-hire director Michael Lembeck (a sitcom vet making his screen debut) managed to infuse the movie with a fun, touching, sweet spirit.

But these acts are akin to Christmas miracles, coming as they do under the burden of a plot -- scratch that, a gimmick -- that revolves around finding even more fine print on the calling card of a dead St. Nick, which turned divorced suburban dad Scott Calvin (Tim Allen) into Santa Claus in the original family comedy from 1994.

It seems the elves waited eight years to inform their new Santa that he has until this Christmas to find a Mrs. Claus -- or else. "The de-Santafication process has already begun," frets head elf Bernard (David Krumholtz) as he shoos Scott off to find a wife. Meanwhile cherubic techie-elf Curtis (played by Spencer Breslin, one of those child actors who runs all his lines together without taking a breath or showing a hint of inflection) clones a big, rubbery toy Santa automaton (played by Allen in heavy prosthetic makeup) to stand in for Scott (unconvincingly) so the other elves won't learn of his predicament and panic at his absence.

Continue reading: The Santa Clause 2 Review

Elizabeth Mitchell

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