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Eli Wallach, Josh Brolin and Wall Street - Eli Wallach and Josh Brolin Monday 20th September 2010 at Ziegfeld Theatre The New York movie premiere of 'Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps' at the Ziegfeld Theatre

Eli Wallach, Josh Brolin and Wall Street
Eli Wallach and Wall Street
Eli Wallach and Wall Street
Eli Wallach and Wall Street
Eli Wallach and Wall Street

Eli Wallach Thursday 22nd April 2010 TCM Classic Film Festival opening night - 'A Star Is Born' premiere held at the Mann's Chinese Theater - Arrivals Los Angeles, California

Eli Wallach

Eli Wallach Wednesday 14th October 2009 New York premiere of 'New York, I Love You at the Ziegfeld Theatre - Arrivals New York City, USA

Eli Wallach
Eli Wallach
Eli Wallach
Eli Wallach

Eli Wallach and family - Eli Wallach and family Tuesday 2nd June 2009 at Directors Guild Of America New York City, USA

Eli Wallach and Family
Eli Wallach and Family

Eli Wallach Wednesday 10th September 2008 Opening night of the Off-Broadway musical 'Enter Laughing' at the York Theatre.

Eli Wallach
Eli Wallach
Eli Wallach and Anne Jackson

Eli Wallach and Joe Pantoliano - Eli Wallach and Joe Pantoliano New York City, USA - The Creative Coalition premiere of 'Canvas' at The French Institute - Arrivals Tuesday 9th October 2007

Eli Wallach and Joe Pantoliano
Eli Wallach and Joe Pantoliano

Baby Doll Review


Very Good
The first shot of Baby Doll slaps you in the face with the promise of something unique and the assurance that you're about to watch a real Tennessee Williams production. That shot is of Carroll Baker, lolling on a child's bed with her thumb in her mouth. When we see Karl Malden leering at her through a peephole, we assume he's the local pervert. He turns out to be her husband. And that's the source of all the film's sexual tension.

Baby Doll (as she's known) turns out to be a virgin, and Malden's Archie is due to change that on her 20th birthday, which is set to occur in two days. But things take a strange turn when one of Archie's competitors, Silva (Eli Wallach) -- both men are cotton gin owner/operators -- accuses Archie of burning down his gin. As payback, Silva figures he'll take the only thing of value that Archie has: His wife... if you could call her that.

Continue reading: Baby Doll Review

The Sentinel Review


Very Good
Next time you rent an apartment, you might check to make sure it's not the doorway to hell before you sign the lease. Alison (Cristina Raines, who vanished from the Hollywood scene in 1987) is a suicidal model who figures this old and roomy place will offer a respite from her rough life. When she complains about the weird and loud neighbors (including an unforgettable and deliciously nasty Beverly D'Angelo, who rubs her crotch to, er, completion when Alison is over for coffee), it turns out no one else lives there. Is it a hallucination or demons? Either way, this is one hell of a sick little horror flick. Watching for stars then and now to make their appearances can alone make the film worthwhile.

The Misfits Review


Excellent
A storied movie, written by Arthur Miller for wife Marilyn Monroe -- whom he would divorce before the film was released, The Misfits is as interesting behind the scenes as it is on the screen. Monroe is marvelous (though reportedly battling severe drug addiction during the filming), driven probably by her hatred for the weak-willed Roslyn, and Clark Gable is memorable too, as an aging cowboy who periodically heads out to the desert and the foothills to go "mustanging," rounding up wild horses... which he'll sell to a dog food company.

Continue reading: The Misfits Review

The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly Review


Essential
Positioned in history between the earnest majesty of John Ford's The Searchers and Sam Peckinpah's doomed cowboy dirge The Wild Bunch, Sergio Leone's The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly is animated by the best those classic westerns have to offer. Sergio Leone's Spaghetti Western masterpiece is still committed to many of the basic conventions of the not-yet moribund genre, embracing the wide-eyed epicness of Ford's standard-bearer. But Blondie (Clint Eastwood), Angel Eyes (Lee Van Cleef), and Tuco (Eli Wallach), the respective title characters, occupy a brutal and complex moral world akin to Peckinpah, where women are beaten, crippled fathers are executed in their homes, and the ironically-named "good" guy earns his name for being only slightly less vile than the other gunslingers.

But Leone's mixture of seemingly incompatible elements is what makes The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly so great. Not only does he combine a Cinemascope-era outlook with an eye for grittiness, but he mingles tasteful realism with a flamboyant, self-conscious style. Freeze frames, intertitles, and point-of-view shots brilliantly co-exist with the meticulously appointed period sets and sweeping frontier vistas. This fusion, in addition to a surplus of creativity and lack of restraint, makes the third in the so-called "man with no name" series the crowning glory of his career.

Continue reading: The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly Review

The Hunter Review


Bad
Steve McQueen's final film wasn't his best. The semi-true story of Ralph "Papa" Thorson, McQueen stars as a modern-day bounty hunter (well, a 1970's bounty hunter anyway) who's stuck in the distant past. In The Hunter, we watch as Thorson cavorts with a series of bail jumping rapscallions, all of them who need reclaimin'.

In a seemingly endless procession of sequences, Thorson captures them all through extraordinary means. Yet he has a pregnant girl waiting for him back home -- so isn't it time he hung all this up and settled down? Well, wouldn't you know it... an angry killer who Thorson has tangled with in the past reappears on the scene, so maybe Thorson's mind will be made up for him!

Continue reading: The Hunter Review

Winter Kills Review


Excellent
A real cult classic, this reimagining of the Kennedy assassination asks what might have gone down in an alternate and very similar universe. Based on the book by Manchurian Candidate author Richard Condon, the story gives us Nick Kegan (Jeff Bridges), the half-brother of a president assassinated 19 years earlier. Suddenly, evidence reveals there was more than one shooter that day (sound familiar?), sending him into a wild -- and often wildly funny -- hunt for his brother's actual killers. Dryly comedic, William Richert takes his directorial debut into impressive places -- and wow, check out that cast! Too bad it gets a little kooky in the end, but that doesn't detract much from a very fun movie.

The Associate Review


Weak
There's a few legendary scripts among screenwriting circles -- scripts that people would love to rip off, if they could figure out how: Witness, Chinatown, Network. And then there's Tootsie, the queen mother of comedy scripts, that gets ripped off all the time.

The Associate is boilerplate Tootsie, lifting the entire plot structure from Dorothy's television world and dropping it on Wall Street, where Whoopi Goldberg finds herself forced to impersonate a man (named Cutty after Cutty Sark scotch) in order to be taken seriously.

Continue reading: The Associate Review

Keeping The Faith Review


Weak
It truly is the oldest joke in the book: "A priest and a rabbi walk into a bar..." Okay, so you've heard this one. Well now you can watch the movie of the joke!

Keeping the Faith may not be quite that bad, but it's nothing to, ahem, preach about. Setting the film up with all the trappings of your classic, neurotic, New York relationship comedy, Faith wants to be a wry When Harry Met Sally... tale of opposites attracting and love conquering all. Oh, the opposites aren't the rabbi Jake (Ben Stiller) and the priest Brian (Ed Norton) -- that might actually be a movie worth watching. The kink in this picture is Jenna Elfman's Anna, the old childhood friend of Jake and Brian, who swishes into town and promptly falls in love with our rabbi.

Continue reading: Keeping The Faith Review

The Two Jakes Review


OK
Never willing to leave a classic alone, Hollywood finally dug up Chinatown and sequelized it with The Two Jakes, and they even let Jack Nicholson take the director's chair.

Continue reading: The Two Jakes Review

The Magnificent Seven Review


Excellent
The Magnificent Seven isn't a great movie, but it is a very cool movie. An explanation: Schindler's List is a great movie, but I think we can agree that we're not going to spend a Saturday afternoon with the guys eating chips and running lines from Spielberg's tribute to the Jews. Watch an hour of The Magnificent Seven and you'll pop open another can of Pringles and consider buying a six-shooter.

A cowboy retelling of Akira Kurosawa's The Seven Samurai, the movie takes place in a Mexican farming village which has been overrun by bandits. The outlaws take the villagers' food, making a grueling life that much tougher. Tired of getting pushed around, several men consult the resident wise old man. "Fight, you must fight," he says.

Continue reading: The Magnificent Seven Review

The Godfather: Part III Review


Good
Why make another Godfather? While he gives it the old college try, Francis Ford Coppola fails to answer the question in The Godfather Part III, which picks up the saga of the Corleones decades later -- which finds Michael (Al Pacino) still unable to go legit. By 1990, he's near death (having heart attacks and whatnot), and he figures the Catholic Church is his best route to legitimacy. And wouldn't you know it, they're corrupt too. Well, you know, just when he thought he was out, they pull him back in...

While the film is well-acted (with the surprising exception of Diane Keaton reprising a role that wasn't all that interesting to begin with), masterfully lighted, and gorgeously photographed -- most notably the various shootout scenes -- it ultimately treads over old ground: material from the first two movies as well as repeating itself. This is most telling in the aforementioned shootouts -- the Atlantic City shoot-'em-up (courtesy of a helicopter outside) is horrifyingly grotesque (in a good way), but it seems more fitting for the histrionics of Scarface than the subtle and jaw-dropping one-two punch of Michael Corleone's assassination work at Louis' Italian-American Restaurant in The Godfather. Ultimately, the movie is simply one assassination after another -- and in Coppola's commentary track, he acknowledges this, placing much of the blame at the foot of the studio. It's also a testament to the amount of power that Coppola lost in the intervening decades -- again, something he acknowledges in the commentary.

Continue reading: The Godfather: Part III Review

Keeping The Faith Review


Very Good

A deftly updated homage to the screwball comedy stylings Howard Hawks, George Cukor and Billy Wilder, "Keeping the Faith" acknowledges right away that its plot, about two men of the cloth falling in love with the same girl, sounds like a lame bar joke.

It opens with the fantastic and versatile Edward Norton ("Fight Club," "American History X") playing a spiritually conflicted -- and at the moment, completely sauced -- Catholic priest, pouring his soul out to a patient bartender. "So there's this priest and this rabbi, and they're best friends, see...," he slurs into his beer.

The rest of the story goes something like this: Ben Stiller co-stars as the padre's rabbi rival for the affections of the magnetic Jenna Elfman, a long-lost friend from their shared Brooklyn childhood who pops back into their lives 20 years later, all grown up, sexy, sweet and irresistible.

Continue reading: Keeping The Faith Review

Eli Wallach

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Eli Wallach

Date of birth

7th December, 1915

Date of death

24th June, 2014

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.78


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Eli Wallach Movies

New York, I Love You Movie Review

New York, I Love You Movie Review

There are 11 captivating short films in this anthology, the second in the Cities of...

Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps Movie Review

Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps Movie Review

Michael Douglas returns to his most iconic role for this 20-years-later sequel to Oliver Stone's...

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Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps Trailer

Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps Trailer

23 years after Gordon Gekko's incarceration for insider trading, he finds himself being released into...

The Ghost [aka The Ghost Writer] Movie Review

The Ghost [aka The Ghost Writer] Movie Review

Tightly wound and told without much fuss, this political thriller is captivating and often quite...

The Hoax Movie Review

The Hoax Movie Review

Everybody loves a good con artist, a guy who can bluff his way into or...

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