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'Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat' Los Angeles premiere

EG Daily - 'Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat' Los Angeles premiere at the Pantages Theater Hollywood - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 6th June 2014

Opening night of 'Priscilla Queen of the Desert'

EG Daily - Opening night of 'Priscilla Queen of the Desert' at the Pantages Theatre - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 29th May 2013

'Priscilla Queen of the Desert' opening

E.G. Daily - 'Priscilla Queen of the Desert' play opening at the Pantages Theatre - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Thursday 30th May 2013

Picture - E.G. Daily Hollywood, California, Thursday 21st April 2011

E.G. Daily Thursday 21st April 2011 'Comediva' Web series Launch Party held at The Beauty Bar Hollywood, California

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Picture - E.G. Daily and Michael Chiklis Los Angeles, California, Saturday 17th October 2009

EG Daily and Michael Chiklis - E.G. Daily and Michael Chiklis Los Angeles, California - The 5th Annual 'inCONCERT' to benefit Project Angel Food at the Howard Fine Theatre - Arrivals Saturday 17th October 2009

E.G. Daily - Is Anybody Home?


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The Devil's Rejects Review


Excellent
House of 1000 Corpses, the last song on Rob Zombie's 2001 album The Sinister Urge, also served as the title track to the metal frontman-turned-filmmaker's 2003 directorial debut, but the cut's country twang-inflected ghoulishness would have made a more apt musical accompaniment for Zombie's The Devil's Rejects. Less a sequel than a spiritual follow-up, the director's latest revisits House's serial-killing Firefly clan as they're cast into the backwater dustbowls of rural America by a sheriff (William Forsythe) intent on exacting vigilante revenge for the murder of his brother. A gritty Western-via-grindhouse modern exploitation flick imbued with the ferocity of independent '70s horror, Zombie's splatterfest wisely alters virtually everything (narratively, stylistically, thematically) that characterized his campy, cartoonish and awkward first film. And from its coarse, graphic visual aesthetic, profusion of classic Southern rock tunes, and portrait of unrepentant mayhem, his film reverentially exults in the deranged spirit and impulsive, unpredictable energy of seminal genre masterpieces The Texas Chain Saw Massacre and The Hills Have Eyes.

The Devil's Rejects diverges from its predecessor beginning with its opening frames, in which the depiction of the Firefly residence - no longer a remote, forest-shrouded funhouse of horrors but, rather, a dilapidated structure situated in a stretch of open land - speaks to the film's rejection of atmospheric claustrophobia in favor of wide-open anarchy. A fascination with rampant disorder certainly fuels the tour de force intro sequence, a bullet-strewn siege on the Firefly home by Sheriff Wydell (Forsythe) and an army of police officers heightened by Zombie's sly use of freeze frames, Sergio Leone-esque close-ups, and The Allman Brothers' "Midnight Rider." Exhibiting a directorial maturity devoid of his former MTV-ish gimmickry (no hyper-edited montages with varying film stocks or bludgeoning industrial heavy metal here), the director orchestrates the chaotic events with feverish abandon, his shaky handheld camera set-ups and scraggly, sun-bleached cinematography (courtesy of Phil Parmet) placing us directly inside the carnage. By the time murderous siblings Otis (Bill Moseley) and Baby (Sheri Moon) escape their now overrun home to seek shelter in the rotting, blindingly white desert, Zombie has demonstrated a newfound adeptness at lacing nasty action with a breakneck thrust and vicious wit.

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The Powerpuff Girls Movie Review


Good
The Motion Picture Association of America, in their policy to specify why a movie receives its rating, gave a PG to the animated feature The Powerpuff Girls Movie for this reason: "non-stop frenetic animated action." Boy, they got that right. Based on creator Craig McCracken's popular Cartoon Network series, this tale of America's cutest superheroes is chock-full of flashing, bullet-fast action sequences as three little girls cause trouble, wreak havoc, and, of course, save the day. As a whole, the film is not as quickly paced as its parts, but the adventure is great fun nonetheless.

And that can be chalked up to the single element that differentiates the heavy-duty action in The Powerpuff Girls from, say, a Pokémon feature: humor. Just like the entertaining television series, the Powerpuff movie has laughs to spare, some aimed at the grade school set and many targeted at their parents.

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The Powerpuff Girls Movie Review


Weak

Successfully super-sized but otherwise no different from an episode of its TV inspiration, "The Powerpuff Girls Movie" is a wait-for-video flick if there ever was one.

Don't get me wrong -- I'm a huge fan of "The Powerpuff Girls." I'm such a huge fan that my favorite Christmas present last year was a trio of stuffed Powerpuff Girls I got from my girlfriend. I keep them next to my bed. You got a problem with that?

But like most entries in the currently trendy TV-cartoons-stretched-to-feature-length-films genre, this movie doesn't do much to justify its big screen status.

Continue reading: The Powerpuff Girls Movie Review

Rugrats In Paris Review


Unbearable

Maybe it's just me, but doesn't it seem flagrantly irresponsible to market a cartoon to kids in which a diaper brigade of babies have wonderful adventures when they wander away from their parents and get lost?

I've never seen the "Rugrats" TV show, but the plots of both nerve-grinding movies that the Nickelodeon series has spawned have involved children disappearing, and treated such events as a cornucopia of light-hearted entertainment.

I might be a little sensitive to the subject, but in a cultural climate in which kids seem to get kidnapped (and often murdered) more and more frequently, do we really want G-rated movies giving our little ones the impression that going missing is great fun?

Continue reading: Rugrats In Paris Review

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