Efren Ramirez

Efren Ramirez

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The LA Launch Of LYCOS Life And The LYCOS Life Project

Efren Ramirez - Celebrities attend The LA Launch Of LYCOS Life And The LYCOS Life Project at at the Banned From TV Jam Space in North Hollywood. at The Banned From TV Jam Space in North Hollywood - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 8th June 2015

Efren Ramirez
Efren Ramirez
Efren Ramirez
Kara Killmer, Efren Ramirez and kara
Kara Killmer and Efren Ramirez

The Los Angeles World Premiere of Warner Bros. Pictures' "Focus."

Efren Ramirez - A variety of stars were photographed as they attended the World Premiere of Warner Bros. Pictures' new film "Focus." The premiere was held at the TCL Chinese Theater in Hollywood, California, United States - Tuesday 24th February 2015

Efren Ramirez
Efren Ramirez

2014 NCLR ALMA Awards - Arrivals

Efren Ramirez - 2014 NCLR ALMA Awards - Arrivals at Pasadena Civic Auditorium - Pasadena, California, United States - Friday 10th October 2014

Efren Ramirez
Efren Ramirez
Efren Ramirez

2014 FanExpo Canada

Efren Ramirez and Jon Heder - 2014 FanExpo at Toronto Metro Convention Centre. - Toronto, Canada - Sunday 31st August 2014

Efren Ramirez
Efren Ramirez and Jon Heder

McDonald's Premium McWrap Launch Party

Efren Ramirez and guest - McDonald's Premium McWrap Launch Party held at Paramount Pictures Studios - Arrivals - Hollywood, California, United States - Thursday 28th March 2013

Efren Ramirez and guest

Casa De Mi Padre Review


OK
This is such a pastiche that it becomes a parody of a parody. So it's impossible to really get involved in the story or characters. But the plot is genuinely clever, and there's a continual stream of knowing gags that'll keep fans of B-movies chuckling.

Armando (Ferrell) is the second son of Miguel (Armendariz), a rancher who dotes on his city-slicker son Raul (Luna) even though he might be a drug dealer. But problems arise with local cartel kingpin Onza (Garcia Bernal) when Raul decides to marry Onza's niece Sonia (Rodriguez). Miguel is delighted, but Armando and his farmhand pals (Ramirez and Martinez) know that big trouble is brewing. Sure enough, an American DEA agent (Offerman) is prowling around with a Federale (Urrego). And if everyone kills each other, it'll make their jobs easier.

Continue reading: Casa De Mi Padre Review

Casa De Mi Padre Trailer


Armando Alvarez is the heir to a Mexican ranch, where he has lived and worked all his life. Meanwhile, his brother, Raul, has a successful career as an international businessman. However, the ranch soon comes into some financial troubles, with Armando at a loss for what to do.

Continue: Casa De Mi Padre Trailer

Casa De Mi Padre Trailer


Armando Alvarez is the heir to a Mexican ranch. He has lived and worked there all his life, while his brother, Raul, has a successful career as an international businessman. The ranch soon experiences some financial difficulties, with Armando at a loss for what to do.

Continue: Casa De Mi Padre Trailer

Employee Of The Month (2006) Review


Weak
Employee of the Month's main character, thirtysomething box boy Zack (Dane Cook), relishes having a job with the least amount of responsibility. When the Costco-like store where he works hires a new, comely cashier (Jessica Simpson) who has a history for hooking up with the employee of the month, Zack decides to try harder so he can win her affection.

Too bad the movie never follows Zack's example. For 103 minutes, Employee of the Month refuses to go beyond shallow observations and silly slapstick, making for an ordinary outing when that should not be the case. Anyone who has ever worked in retail (or seen Clerks) knows there's a wealth of material for a good comedy. When I managed a used bookstore, a customer argued her case for a lower price by repeatedly stating that she was "a lawyer." At Borders, I had another customer so convinced we carried International Male (we didn't) that he was threatened with police action. Also at Borders, I have never worked with so many people who had visible tattoos, including one who had a small image of a pen and book on her lower back.

Continue reading: Employee Of The Month (2006) Review

Napoleon Dynamite Review


Excellent
If one had to find a problem with teenage underdog movies, one of the most prominent ones would have to be that they always seem to want audiences to feel sympathy for the plight of their sad protagonists. In Napoleon Dynamite, even though the hero of the title (Jon Heder) is a four-eyed teenage misfit with no social skills and a truly frightening haircut - and he couldn't care less. Napoleon Dynamite is confident about his ability to draw fantasy characters in the pages of his Trapper Keeper ("I'm pretty much the best at it") and isn't afraid to voice his approval when something goes his way ("Sweet!") or get pissy when somebody asks him what he's doing that day ("Whatever I feel like doing, gosh!"). He's a hero for the ages; it's just not entirely clear what age.

Napoleon Dynamite isn't much of a film, when you break it down outside the theater, when the cheers have died away and you're left with the nagging question: But what was it about? Napoleon attends high school in a small Idaho town, living with his much older but just as dweeby brother, Kip (Aaron Ruell) and his grandmother who, at the start of the film, has just landed herself in the hospital after a four-wheeler accident. This precipitates sleazoid Uncle Rico (Jon Gries), with his dreams of lost football glory and ideas about door-to-door sales, moving into the house to watch the boys and generally make them feel crappy about themselves. There's the barest hint of a storyline about Napoleon getting a crush on a girl from his class, Deb (Tina Majorino), but that's really only there to give him somebody to dance with at the prom. Slightly better is Napoleon's friendship with the nearly-mute Pedro (Efren Ramierez), the new kid in school, and the battle they wage against the cool clique in order to win Pedro the school presidency. Oh, and there's a big joke about tater tots - Election it ain't.

Continue reading: Napoleon Dynamite Review

Employee Of The Month Review


Weak
Employee of the Month's main character, thirtysomething box boy Zack (Dane Cook), relishes having a job with the least amount of responsibility. When the Costco-like store where he works hires a new, comely cashier (Jessica Simpson) who has a history for hooking up with the employee of the month, Zack decides to try harder so he can win her affection.

Too bad the movie never follows Zack's example. For 103 minutes, Employee of the Month refuses to go beyond shallow observations and silly slapstick, making for an ordinary outing when that should not be the case. Anyone who has ever worked in retail (or seen Clerks) knows there's a wealth of material for a good comedy. When I managed a used bookstore, a customer argued her case for a lower price by repeatedly stating that she was "a lawyer." At Borders, I had another customer so convinced we carried International Male (we didn't) that he was threatened with police action. Also at Borders, I have never worked with so many people who had visible tattoos, including one who had a small image of a pen and book on her lower back.

Continue reading: Employee Of The Month Review

Crank Review


Good
They call it the "Beijing cocktail" and when it's injected into your bloodstream you've got about an hour to live. The science behind the drug is cloudy. But all you need to know is that it slows your heart to a crawl. A deadly crawl. The only solution is adrenalin. Lots and lots of adrenalin. When contract killer Chev Chelios (Jason Statham) is pumped full of "Beijing cocktail" he catches on quick that to survive - see his girl, kill the man who doped him, even some scores - he's got to keep moving. Keep pumped. This means we're treated to roughly 90 minutes of Statham ingesting, swilling, snorting or injecting every drug, energy drink and caffeine powder he can find. Exactly 85 minutes of Statham racing through downtown L.A., bowling over pedestrians, shooting mobsters, brawling with gang bangers and having sex in public. Eighty-five minutes of Statham doing anything and everything possible to keep his heart beating as rapidly as it can. Crank is trashy, vulgar, violent, and every bit as excessive as you'd imagine. I loved every delirious minute of it.

The best parts of the film are those you don't expect. We know that Statham, being a hit man (and British at that), will go after the men who wronged him. We know he'll get into all manner of complications along the way. That's Action Film 101. Where Crank excels is in its inventiveness. Like Pulp Fiction before it (or the recent, underrated Running Scared) the thrill is in the unexpected turns. And the plot of Crank is geared for constant invention. Stratham needs to stay mobile, needs to stay pumped, so the film never passes up an opportunity to shove some action his way. When Statham begins to flag (the sound flutters, the picture dims) and he needs an adrenaline fix, the audience is cued for another round. It's almost William Castle-like in its fun gimmickry.

Continue reading: Crank Review

Napoleon Dynamite Review


Excellent
If one had to find a problem with teenage underdog movies, one of the most prominent ones would have to be that they always seem to want audiences to feel sympathy for the plight of their sad protagonists. In Napoleon Dynamite, even though the hero of the title (Jon Heder) is a four-eyed teenage misfit with no social skills and a truly frightening haircut - and he couldn't care less. Napoleon Dynamite is confident about his ability to draw fantasy characters in the pages of his Trapper Keeper ("I'm pretty much the best at it") and isn't afraid to voice his approval when something goes his way ("Sweet!") or get pissy when somebody asks him what he's doing that day ("Whatever I feel like doing, gosh!"). He's a hero for the ages; it's just not entirely clear what age.

Napoleon Dynamite isn't much of a film, when you break it down outside the theater, when the cheers have died away and you're left with the nagging question: But what was it about? Napoleon attends high school in a small Idaho town, living with his much older but just as dweeby brother, Kip (Aaron Ruell) and his grandmother who, at the start of the film, has just landed herself in the hospital after a four-wheeler accident. This precipitates sleazoid Uncle Rico (Jon Gries), with his dreams of lost football glory and ideas about door-to-door sales, moving into the house to watch the boys and generally make them feel crappy about themselves. There's the barest hint of a storyline about Napoleon getting a crush on a girl from his class, Deb (Tina Majorino), but that's really only there to give him somebody to dance with at the prom. Slightly better is Napoleon's friendship with the nearly-mute Pedro (Efren Ramierez), the new kid in school, and the battle they wage against the cool clique in order to win Pedro the school presidency. Oh, and there's a big joke about tater tots - Election it ain't.

Continue reading: Napoleon Dynamite Review

Napoleon Dynamite Review


OK

Seething with teen-angst irritability and an obstinate blind ignorance to just how much of an outcast he is, Napoleon Dynamite may be the biggest dork in the history of high school movies.

Completely lacking in social graces, the lanky, slack-jawed, sleepy-eyed, bed-headed and shoulder-hunched titular anti-hero of this off-kilter comedy (played with unabashed geek gusto by newcomer Jon Heder) can't even manage to speak to a girl without putting his foot in his mouth. But it isn't nerves that bring him down -- it's nerve, as in "you've got a lot of nerve, pal."

"I see your drinking one-percent milk. Is that 'cause you think you're fat?" is his idea of an opening line to a very disinterested girl in the cafeteria of his lifelessly rural-edge-of-suburbia Idaho high school. "You're not. You could be drinking whole."

Continue reading: Napoleon Dynamite Review

Efren Ramirez

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