Eduardo Noriega

Eduardo Noriega

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Premiere of 'Requisitos Para Ser Una Persona Normal'

Eduardo Noriega - Madrid premiere of 'Requisitos Para Ser Una Persona Normal' at Palafox cinema - Arrivals - Madrid, Spain - Wednesday 3rd June 2015

Eduardo Noriega
Eduardo Noriega
Eduardo Noriega
Eduardo Noriega
Eduardo Noriega

28th Annual Goya Film Awards

Eduardo Noriega - eduardo Noriega during the 28th annual Goya Film Awards ceremony - Madrid, Spain - Sunday 9th February 2014

eduardo Noriega

The Last Stand Review


Weak

Korean filmmaker Kim played with the Western genre before in his wacky 2008 pastiche The Good the Bad the Weird, and this film is just as chaotically uneven, mixing cartoon-style silliness with grisly violence. But the high-energy approach holds our interest, as does Schwarzenegger's immense screen presence in his first starring role since his political career. The film is far too jumbled to hold together, but its sardonic sense of humour makes it a decent guilty pleasure.

Arnie plays Sheriff Owens, who has a quiet routine in his sleepy Arizona-Mexico border town. So when a stranger (Stormare) appears, he sends his deputies (Alexander and Gilford) to investigate. Things get violent quickly, so he deputises a drunken veteran (Santoro) and a moronic gun-nut (Knoxville) to work alongside another deputy (Guzman). What he doesn't yet know is that the baddies are part of an elaborate plan to help a drug kingpin (Noriega) escape from a Law Vegas FBI Agent (Whitaker) and cross the border to freedom in Mexico.

The whizzy plot actually has promise as a straightforward action movie, but Kim throws so much nuttiness at the screen that we can't take anything seriously. The story zings from set-piece to set-piece without much concern for credibility or coherence. It's all very cool, especially the baddie's glimmering, super-fast prototype Corvette, which travels "faster than a chopper" on isolated country roads that are improbably smooth. And his climactic plan to get over the border is astonishingly silly, but played dead straight.

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Picture - Eduardo Noriega , Monday 14th January 2013

Eduardo Noriega The World Premiere of 'The Last Stand' shown at Grauman's Chinese Theatre Featuring: Eduardo Noriega Where: Los Angeles, California, United States When: 14 Jan 2013

Eduardo Noriega and Grauman's Chinese Theatre
Eduardo Noriega and Grauman's Chinese Theatre

Blackthorn Review


Excellent
Plaintive and perhaps too slow-moving for mainstream audiences, this finely made Western cycles through a rather long, complex narrative. But it's thoroughly involving, with terrific characters and an engaging emotional punch.

It turns out that Butch Cassidy didn't die in a hail of gunfire in 1908 Bolivia after all. Now calling himself James Blackthorn (Shepard), he's still living there 20 years later with his girlfriend Yana (Solier). But after he decides to return home, he's waylaid by Eduardo (Noriega), a city-slicker who has embezzled thousands from a brutal businessman. Their ensuing adventures spark memories of Blackthorn's days as a young outlaw (Coster-Waldau in flashbacks) with the Sundance Kid (Delaney) and Etta Place (McElligott), chased to South America by the dogged lawman McKinley (Rea).

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Transsiberian Review


OK
As the train rattles through the frozen tundra with its cargo of weary passengers, a melancholic detective gives the American tourists an idea of just how far into it they've stepped: "In Russia we have a saying, With lies you may go forward in the world, but you may never go back." To same extent, this is the Slavic equivalent of fortune cookie wisdom. Ah, Russia, with its apparently inexhaustible capacity for resigned suffering. But as presented here, in the context of a tight and terse thriller like Transsiberian, and coming out of the mouth of a particularly sharp Ben Kingsley, cynical bits of wisdom like that go down like an invigorating shot of chilled vodka.

In Brad Anderson's film, the scenario is one we've seen before, but it's handled here with an unusual alacrity. Woody Harrelson and Emily Mortimer play Roy and Jessie, a pair of young Americans who just finished a volunteering stint in China and are now taking the Trans-Siberian train all the way to Moscow. Both as comfortable in their roles as few actors are ever allowed to be, the two need little more than a handful of lines and a couple of telling looks to apprise viewers of their characters. As the good-natured Christian rube from Iowa, and the girl with a past who's looking to put it all behind her but doesn't trust herself to do so, the two are ripe for the plucking. So when a dark and sexy couple in black move into Roy and Jessie's cabin, it's all a question of time before the Americans find themselves in a situation they're less than prepared for.

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The Method Review


Good
The reality television metaphors come flying at you fast and thick in Spanish filmmaker Marcelo Piñeyro's The Method, which provides for a lot of easy audience identification -- hey, I've seen Survivor -- but makes it just a bit too recognizable for comfort, at least until the end, when its existential modus operandi becomes terrifyingly clear. There are plenty of other comparisons to be drawn from this exercise in business-world gamesmanship, from Mamet's Glengarry Glen Ross to LaBute's In the Company of Men, though Piñeyro's has a more gender-neutral agenda: in short, women are just as exceptional bastards as men.

Set almost entirely in a nicely-appointed conference room in a Madrid office building, The Method begins with a very telling split-screen montage: As we watch the characters go about their morning routines, traffic is piling up and the streets thickening with protestors. The IMF-World Bank conference is in town and the anti-globalization forces are marshalling for a Seattle-esque day of angry confrontation. But this is of little concern to the seven, who have taken advantage of the protests (many offices have shut down for the day) to go to a group interview for an executive job at Dexia Corporation. Of course, we are never privy to knowing what it is that Dexia does, but such specifics are entirely beside the point.

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Open Your Eyes Review


Excellent
If Stanley Kubrick and David Lynch had collaborated on a project, the result might have been something like Open Your Eyes. Kubrick's most common themes -- imaginary worlds, sexual and social obsessions, distrust of emotion, human depravity, and a journey towards freedom and self-knowledge -- present themselves here. Lynch's usual themes -- dreams and illusion vs. reality, persuasion, fear, self-submission, murder, and curiosity -- also sprinkle themselves into this movie's stirring, complex recipe.

From the moment the movie opens, it's unclear of what is real and what is not. We meet a handsome, young, successful businessman named César (Eduardo Noriega), who drives expensive cars, resides in a classy residence, and enjoys an endless supply of beautiful women.

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The Devil's Backbone Review


Good
Guillermo del Toro returns to Spanish-language thrillseeking with this creepfest, a period piece ghost story that often gets under your skin, though not quite with the same dramatic flair as Cronos. Del Toro puts the action at the end of the Spanish Civil War in 1939, plopping us at a remote orphanage in the desert countryside. The orphanage has bigger problems than Franco, however: There's gold hidden in them thar walls, an unexploded bomb in the courtyard, and a dead kid at the bottom of a pool. Throw into the mix some pickled fetuses (and one horrific scene where the old patriarch drinks some of the brine), and you're set up for a freakshow royale.

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Open Your Eyes Review


Excellent

"Open Your Eyes" is a jaw-dropping psychological thriller about the power of the human mind to bend and break reality -- or is it?

With more twists than a strand of DNA, co-writer and director Alejandro Amenabar delves headlong into the increasingly erratic mind of a rich, charming, devastatingly handsome egoist who becomes unhinged after being horribly disfigured in a car crash.

Eduardo Noriega plays Cesar, a habitual love 'em and leave 'em charmer who at his 25th birthday party meets Sofia (Penelope Cruz), his best friend's date and the first girl who has ever truly made his heart race.

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The Devil's Backbone Review


Weak

Sublimely atmospheric but erratically chilling, "The Devil's Backbone" is a promising Spanish spooker about a haunted orphanage, but it's too hung up on being more than just a ghost story.

Taking place during the Spanish Civil War, the film opens during a nighttime bombing raid in which a huge ordnance slams the building's courtyard but doesn't explode.

Months later when a war orphan named Carlos (Fernando Tielve) is abandoned at the remote, dilapidated institution, the rusting hulk of the bomb still sticks straight up out of the ground, looming over the day-to-day lives of the children and their caretakers.

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Eduardo Noriega

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