Edie Mcclurg

Edie Mcclurg

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Edie McClurg - Burbank International Film Festival - Closing Night Party - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 8th September 2014

Edie Mcclurg

Edie McClurg - BET Awards Gifting Suite hosted by Celebrity Connected held at the Sofitel Beverly Hills - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 28th June 2014

Edie Mcclurg

Edie McClurg - The Groundlings theatre and school celebrate their 40th anniversary with some of their favorite alumni, current company, friends and family at the all new HYDE Sunset Kitchen + Cocktails - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 1st June 2014

Edie Mcclurg
Edie Mcclurg

Conrad Bain, Dixie Carter, Edie McClurg, Danny Cooksey and Gary Coleman - Diff'rent Strokes United States Saturday 19th March 1983

Conrad Bain, Dixie Carter, Edie Mcclurg, Danny Cooksey and Gary Coleman

Edie McClurg Monday 7th February 2011 AARP The Magazine's 10th Annual Movies for Grownups Awards held at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel - Arrivals Los Angeles, California

Edie Mcclurg

Fired Up! Review


OK
Broad and very silly, this comedy just about keeps us chuckling even when things get stupid and predictable. It's not very well-written, but there are enough deranged characters to make it almost worth a look.

At Gerald Ford High School, two chucklehead jock pals--nice guy Shawn (D'Agosto) and blond hunk Nick (Olsen)--decide to skip a gruelling football practice and chase girls at cheerleader camp instead. Of course, they soon start to actually enjoy themselves, and Shawn begins to fall for one of his teammates (Roemer), but trouble is brewing as they prepare to face the archrival Panthers. Meanwhile, Nick tries to woo the seductive Diora (Sims), wife of the camp's gung-ho director (Higgins).

Continue reading: Fired Up! Review

The Little Mermaid Review


Very Good
DIsney's animation team looked just about washed up (no pun intended) before The Little Mermaid hit theaters in 1989. Before The Little Mermaid, we had "classics" like The Great Mouse Detective and Oliver & Company. Afterwards, Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, The Lion King. The Little Mermaid was a turning point, reviving Disney's animation studio by grossing almost $110 million at the box office. It was also the last hand-painted Disney film, and the first to use computer animation.

That said, The Little Mermaid is not that great of a movie. The story is simplistic to an extreme, and the animation is extremely crude, a rush job that looks better if you aren't wearing your glasses. But thanks to a spunky heroine with a clamshell brassiere, a menacing villain, singing animals, and some calypso-inspired tunes, The Little Mermaid was a hit with kids and adults. It's certainly not brain food, but give this fish the credit its due: Turning around Disney.

Continue reading: The Little Mermaid Review

Ferris Bueller's Day Off Review


Essential
One hell of a classic. A defining film for every single star in the list to your right -- hell, Ben Stein built a career out of one word ("Bueller?") here. It's amazing that Broderick is the only one who really hit it big after Bueller, but we'll always have video.

Continue reading: Ferris Bueller's Day Off Review

A River Runs Through It Review


Very Good
Of the six movies Robert Redford has directed to date, A River Runs Through It is his second best, following behind the searing, unforgettable Ordinary People. A specialist in bringing books to life as movies, Redford has a knack for finding what matters in the text and making sure it ends up on screen.

That's vital here because Norman Maclean, on whose novella-length memoir the film is based, was a writer of exceptional grace and economy. This is a simple story that must be told the way he wrote it, and Redford delivers, even using excerpts as the narration he reads. Smart move, Bob.

Continue reading: A River Runs Through It Review

Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star Review


Weak
Did you ever reminisce about your favorite sitcom star from the '70s or '80s and wonder, "Where are they now?" Well, you've finally got your answer. They've all been diligently working on the set of Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star, a grossly unfunny Hollywood satire hatched from the brain of David Spade that's heavy on the celebrity cameos but fresh out of clever ideas.

Dickie Roberts shot up the Hollywood ladder at a young age. A child phenomenon, he lorded over a hit sitcom and reaped the benefits of being a celebrity. He even had his own catchphrase -- "This is nucking futs!" But it all came crashing down the day his show got cancelled.

Continue reading: Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star Review

The Little Mermaid Review


Very Good
DIsney's animation team looked just about washed up (no pun intended) before The Little Mermaid hit theaters in 1989. Before The Little Mermaid, we had "classics" like The Great Mouse Detective and Oliver & Company. Afterwards, Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, The Lion King. The Little Mermaid was a turning point, reviving Disney's animation studio by grossing almost $110 million at the box office. It was also the last hand-painted Disney film, and the first to use computer animation.

That said, The Little Mermaid is not that great of a movie. The story is simplistic to an extreme, and the animation is extremely crude, a rush job that looks better if you aren't wearing your glasses. But thanks to a spunky heroine with a clamshell brassiere, a menacing villain, singing animals, and some calypso-inspired tunes, The Little Mermaid was a hit with kids and adults. It's certainly not brain food, but give this fish the credit its due: Turning around Disney.

Continue reading: The Little Mermaid Review

Kiki's Delivery Service Review


Very Good
Hayao Miyazaki scored a big kid-friendly hit with this story about a 13-year-old witch living on her own for the first time. (Yeah, tough love for pubescent Japanese witches!) Unfortunately, Kiki's Delivery Service lacks a lot of depth; though it's exquisitely sweet and endlessly watchable (and much better than Miyazaki's widly overrated Castle of Cagliostro),

Kiki (voiced in the U.S. version by Kirsten Dunst), in keeping with her people's tradition, jets off with broom and talking cat (Phil Hartman) to a random city in order to become the town witch. Unfortunately, Kiki hasn't really thought this through, and soon enough she finds that not only does she have no real marketable skills, she has no place to live and little money, too.

Continue reading: Kiki's Delivery Service Review

Flubber Review


Bad
See Inspector Gadget. Add anthropomorphic green goo. Same movie. Similarly stupid and vapid.

Planes, Trains & Automobiles Review


Essential
In 1987 John Hughes took a huge risk. The man who had spent three years profiling the lives of teenagers did the unthinkable: He wrote and directed two movies featuring adults: She's Having a Baby and Planes, Trains & Automobiles.

She's Having a Baby is a pleasant comedy, but PTA is an absolute gem and one of the 1980s' most overlooked movies, a mixture of human drama and dizzying goofiness that qualifies it for timeless status. I should know. A co-worker and I continually quote lines from this 17-year-old movie. At this point we could audition for a remake.

Continue reading: Planes, Trains & Automobiles Review

Master Of Disguise Review


Terrible

"The funny voices? The silly faces? They were funny for about one second," says a woman breaking the heart of Pistachio Disguisey (Dana Carvey) in the nitwit kiddie spy flick "Master of Disguise."

She couldn't be more right. In a transparently desperate attempt at a career comeback, Carvey hams like a bad Christmas dinner as Pistachio, a clumsy twit of an Italian waiter who learns that he comes from a long line of disguise experts who have been "protecting the world from evil over the centuries."

For no explained reason, his father (James Brolin) has kept the family history a secret from Pistachio. But when Pistachio's mom and dad are kidnapped by their old arch-enemy -- a black-market art collector named Devlin Bowman (Brent Spiner) -- Grandpa (Harold Gould) shows up to train Pistachio for a rescue mission designed to showcase Carvey's ability to affect an endless array of annoying personas.

Continue reading: Master Of Disguise Review

Edie Mcclurg

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Berlin House Where David Bowie And Iggy Pop Lived Marked By Plaque

Berlin House Where David Bowie And Iggy Pop Lived Marked By Plaque

The flat at Hauptstrasse 155 was where Bowie and Iggy lived between 1976 and 1978 in the city, which inspired the so-called 'Berlin trilogy' albums.

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Rupert Grint To Star In TV Re-Make Of 'Snatch'

Rupert Grint To Star In TV Re-Make Of 'Snatch'

Grint will star alongside Dougray Scott and Ed Westwick in a 10-part TV series for Sony's streaming platform Crackle.

Coldplay Invite James Corden Onstage To Play Prince Tribute

Coldplay Invite James Corden Onstage To Play Prince Tribute

The Brits teamed up at the Hollywood Rose Bowl to perform a cover of The Purple One's 'Nothing Compares 2 U'.

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Edie McClurg Movies

Fired Up! Movie Review

Fired Up! Movie Review

Broad and very silly, this comedy just about keeps us chuckling even when things get...

Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star Movie Review

Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star Movie Review

Did you ever reminisce about your favorite sitcom star from the '70s or '80s and...

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Master Of Disguise Movie Review

Master Of Disguise Movie Review

"The funny voices? The silly faces? They were funny for about one second," says a...

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