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The Comedian - Clip & Trailer


Once, Jackie Burke was one of the biggest names in town; he was a comedian with his own show on a prime network and his life looked like he was set. Now, aging and working as a stand-up comic, Jackie wants to reinvent himself and forget about all the old jokes he used to tell and characters he used to play but that's far from what the bookers and audience members want - they wish to see the old Jackie Burke performing his known material.

One night Jackie takes to the stage and he can only take a certain amount of crowd heckling, fed up he lashes out at an audience member and as a result, the comedian is incarcerated and made to carry out a community service order.

Though Jackie had to serve a short sentence, the footage of Jackie hitting the heckler has made him an internet sensation and introduced a whole load of new fans to him.

Continue: The Comedian - Clip & Trailer

Edie Falco - 2016 Tribeca Film Festival - 'Elvis & Nixon' - Premiere at Tribeca Film Festival - New York, United States - Monday 18th April 2016

Edie Falco
Edie Falco

Edie Falco , Aida Turturro - HBO's 'Vinyl' series premiere - Arrivals at Ziegfeld Theater - New York City, New York, United States - Friday 15th January 2016

Edie Falco and Aida Turturro
Edie Falco
Edie Falco
Edie Falco

Edie Falco , Aida Turturro - New York premiere of 'Vinyl' at Ziegfeld Theatre - Arrivals at Ziegfeld Theater - New York, New York, United States - Friday 15th January 2016

Edie Falco and Aida Turturro
Edie Falco
Edie Falco

Edie Falco - HBO's 'Vinyl' series premiere - Arrivals - New York, New York, United States - Friday 15th January 2016

Edie Falco
Edie Falco
Edie Falco
Edie Falco
Edie Falco and Aida Turturro

Edie Falco , Aida Turturro - Opening night for Fool For Love at the Samuel J. Friedman Theatre - Arrivals. at Samuel J. Friedman Theatre, - New York City, New York, United States - Friday 9th October 2015

Edie Falco and Aida Turturro

Edie Falco - 53rd New York Film Festival - Opening Night Gala - 'The Walk' Premiere - Red Carpet Arrivals - Manhattan, New York, United States - Saturday 26th September 2015

Edie Falco

Edie Falco - 67th Annual Emmy Awards at Microsoft Theatre at Microsoft Theatre, Emmy Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 20th September 2015

Edie Falco
Edie Falco
Edie Falco

Edie Falco - BAFTA Los Angeles TV Tea 2015 held at SLS Hotel - Arrivals at SLS Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 19th September 2015

Edie Falco
Edie Falco
Edie Falco
Edie Falco
Edie Falco
Edie Falco

Edie Falco Gives Moving Tribute To James Gandolfini At Emmy Awards


James Gandolfini Edie Falco Cory Monteith Jane Lynch Michael J Fox Robin Williams Jean Stapleton Rob Reiner

James Gandolfini was remembered by his The Sopranos co-star Edie Falco in an emotional tribute to the late actor during Sunday (22 Sept.) night's 65th Annual Emmy Awards. In a ceremony that featured a number of memorials to fallen stars, Falco's appraisal of her on-screen husband was by far one of the most poignant of the night as she led the ceremony into a hushed remembrance of the acting great.

Edie Falco Sopranos
Falco and Gandolfini during one of their many domestic disputes

Falco, who played the long-suffering Carmela Soprano in the ever-popular series, fought back the tears as she remembered the late actor, who passed away in June aged 51. She remembered Gandolfini as a man of "tremendous warmth and heart" and who was "uniquely generous," being nothing like the character he will be best remembered for.

Continue reading: Edie Falco Gives Moving Tribute To James Gandolfini At Emmy Awards

James Gandolfini Recives Tributes From Family And On Screen Family


James Gandolfini Edie Falco

The news that Sopranos star James Gandolfini had died of a heart attack aged 51 seemed to transcend the usual reaction to a celebrity death. There were no quick jokes, just heartfelt tributes, none more so than from those who knew the Jersey-born actor.

Edie Falco, who shared one of the most famous, devastating and believable on-screen partnerships in TV history, issued a statement. “The love between Tony and Carmela was one of the greatest I’ve ever known,” she said. “My heart goes out to his family, as those of us in his pretend one hold on to the memories of our intense and beautiful time together.” Jamie-Lynn Sigler, who played Tony’s daughter Meadow sent her best wished. “This news has left me heartbroken,” she said. “I spent 10 years of my life studying and admiring one of the most brilliant actors, yes, but importantly one of the greatest men. I treasure my memories with him and feel so honored that I was an up-close witness to his greatness.”

Gandolfini died in Italy, while on holiday with his family and family friend Carole Marini. “There was no sign of trouble,” said Marini, wife of “Dancing with the Stars” veteran Gilles Marini. “For us, it was a shock.” His heart attack was followed by a desperate 40-minute survival effot, alas, to no avail. “The patient was considered dead on arrival,” said Dr. Claudio Modini, the emergency room chief. Sky Atlantic will be showing four classic Sopranos episodes tomorrow (Friday, June 21) in honour of the great actor.

Continue reading: James Gandolfini Recives Tributes From Family And On Screen Family

Edie Falco and Alec Baldwin Monday 28th February 2011 Museum of The Moving Image Salute to Alec Baldwin at Cipriani 42nd Street New York City, USA

Edie Falco and Alec Baldwin
Edie Falco and Alec Baldwin
Edie Falco and Alec Baldwin
Edie Falco and Alec Baldwin
Edie Falco and Alec Baldwin
Edie Falco and Alec Baldwin

Edie Falco Monday 14th February 2011 Naked Angels 25th Anniversary Gala New York City, USA

Edie Falco
Edie Falco
Edie Falco
Edie Falco, Lili Taylor and Ron Rifkin

The Quiet Review


Bad
A film that does its best to make the horrendous palatable, and the unthinkable titillating, The Quiet can be either (depending on your taste) a wrenching experience, or merely worth a giggle. It is, after all, a film about a deaf-mute teenaged girl named Dot (Camilla Belle), sent to live with her weird godparents and their popular cheerleader Nina (Elisha Cuthbert) after her father dies -- so really one can only take it so seriously. Clichés are the order of the day, with bitchy cheerleaders ruling the high school cafeteria and deep, nasty secrets discovered by people who just happen to be walking down darkened hallways in the depths of night. And if one has to ask whether this seemingly placid suburban environment is about to be torn asunder by scandal, one really hasn't watched enough television.

Director Jamie Babbit hardly showed much promise with her debut film, the stiff, one-note 1999 comedy But I'm a Cheerleader, but one would have thought that the intervening years spent directing episodes of such sharp TV comedies as Malcolm in the Middle and Gilmore Girls would have honed her talent somewhat. No such luck. The Quiet is so tone-deaf that when it should be eliciting sympathy or empathy, it comes off as simply amateur comedy -- Pretty Persuasion without the guts. She's put together a good enough cast here, with Edie Falco and Martin Donovan playing Nina's parents (the former a prescription-medication-zonked stereotype and the latter a creepy and controlling menace), though they're mostly marooned amidst the cartoonish plot of adolescent brooding and familial dysfunction. As Dot, Belle is stuck with providing her dialogue via maudlin voiceover ("I am invisible") while Cuthbert has to do what she can with a script that sends her character ping-ponging between damaged, vulnerable victim and Heathers-esque school-dominating bitch.

Continue reading: The Quiet Review

The Quiet Review


Bad
A film that does its best to make the horrendous palatable, and the unthinkable titillating, The Quiet can be either (depending on your taste) a wrenching experience, or merely worth a giggle. It is, after all, a film about a deaf-mute teenaged girl named Dot (Camilla Belle), sent to live with her weird godparents and their popular cheerleader Nina (Elisha Cuthbert) after her father dies -- so really one can only take it so seriously. Clichés are the order of the day, with bitchy cheerleaders ruling the high school cafeteria and deep, nasty secrets discovered by people who just happen to be walking down darkened hallways in the depths of night. And if one has to ask whether this seemingly placid suburban environment is about to be torn asunder by scandal, one really hasn't watched enough television.Director Jamie Babbit hardly showed much promise with her debut film, the stiff, one-note 1999 comedy But I'm a Cheerleader, but one would have thought that the intervening years spent directing episodes of such sharp TV comedies as Malcolm in the Middle and Gilmore Girls would have honed her talent somewhat. No such luck. The Quiet is so tone-deaf that when it should be eliciting sympathy or empathy, it comes off as simply amateur comedy -- Pretty Persuasion without the guts. She's put together a good enough cast here, with Edie Falco and Martin Donovan playing Nina's parents (the former a prescription-medication-zonked stereotype and the latter a creepy and controlling menace), though they're mostly marooned amidst the cartoonish plot of adolescent brooding and familial dysfunction. As Dot, Belle is stuck with providing her dialogue via maudlin voiceover ("I am invisible") while Cuthbert has to do what she can with a script that sends her character ping-ponging between damaged, vulnerable victim and Heathers-esque school-dominating bitch.And what to make of this script by Abdi Nazemian and Micah Schraft? Undoubtedly they believed they were crafting a dark little drama about suburbia's seamy underbelly, with a symbolism-laden deaf-mute protagonist to act as a bid for arthouse cred. Instead they've put together a crude mash-up of teenage cruelty -- Nina tries so hard to make life hell for her new sister that you can almost see the sweat beads on her brow -- and stock representations of parental hypocrisy, with a persistent undertone of sexual perversity that veers more than once into leering exploitation. Nina's best friend, the ultra-slutty Michelle (Katy Mixon), has a porn fixation, while the object of her X-rated lunchtime conversation, the star basketball player, Connor (Shawn Ashmore), appears sexually attracted to Dot simply because of her passivity.Although the balance of The Quiet pivots around the revelation of two shock twists, they're both so predictable that even Desperate Housewives wouldn't stoop to using them. Director Babbit's handling of the fallout from these twists, which should have been heavily emotional material, careens instead quite quickly into high camp of a sort that's quite impossible to enjoy without a stiff drink -- or three.

Freedomland Review


Very Good
Unless you've burned through Richard Price's 1998 novel Freedomland, it's tough to pinpoint which direction this taut adaptation is headed. What starts as a routine police investigation erupts into a race riot before collapsing into a chilling portrait of a deranged killer.

Price accepted the challenge of converting his own novel into a shootable screenplay, which is good news. He retains the suspense and social commentary that strengthened his book. Sony then turned the script over to Joe Roth, which should terrify anyone who sat through the director's dippy America's Sweethearts or foul Christmas with the Kranks. Fear not, for Roth lets slip a gritty side as he allows Price to guide us through some darkened passages, literally and figuratively.

Continue reading: Freedomland Review

Judy Berlin Review


Good
Judy Berlin has the unmistakable characteristics of a Woody Allen film (though it's not one). Its cerebral humor, rash characters, and ensemble cast are gelled with a very Allenesque theme: that life has simply passed by the small, predominantly Jewish community of Babylon, Long Island. First time director Eric Mendelsohn, who reportedly worked with Allen on several films, shoots in black and white, and effectively paints a dreary reality for the people of the small suburb.

As the story goes, it is the second day of school and the fall is in full swing. David Gold (Aaron Harnick) has returned to his parent's home after spending time working in the film business in California. He runs into old high school classmate Judy Berlin (Edie Falco - from HBO's Oz and The Sopranos), an outspoken yet dimwitted aspiring actress on her way to Hollywood that very evening. The story follows their respective families as Judy and David spend the day reminiscing while a solar eclipse darkens the town.

Continue reading: Judy Berlin Review

Trouble On The Corner Review


Weak
Amateurish (and awfully titled) thriller has Tony Goldwyn romping about an urban apartment building, practicing as the local psychiatrist now and then, offing his patients when the mood strikes. Has some bright spots, but overwhelmingly the movie is slow and plodding and just plain badly made. Really not worth the trouble.

Sunshine State Review


Very Good
One prominent theme has run through the recent work of maverick filmmaker John Sayles: the search for identity. A need to belong. A desire to know one's place in the world. Within Sayles's trademark ensemble pieces, characters try to define themselves, with many at a crossroads in their lives... whether they know it or not. Most of the beauty and irony with which Sayles tells their tales is present in Sunshine State, but Sayles's narrative is a bit short in comparison to his previous opuses.

The brilliance of Sayles's stories is that he places these people within a much bigger parallel -- a geographical or cultural landscape that's changing as much as its inhabitants are. In City of Hope, it was an unnamed New Jersey city with political problems. In Lone Star -- in my opinion, Sayles's true masterpiece -- it was an evolving Texas border town. In Sunshine State, it's the fictional town of Delrona Beach, a sleepy Florida locale whose land and people are in the process of being overrun by shrewd real estate developers.

Continue reading: Sunshine State Review

Judy Berlin Review


OK

A sardonic yet adoring, antic allegory about a menagerie of neurotic Long Island oddballs following and/or abandoning their dreams, "Judy Berlin" is a strange little film that got left behind like a red-headed step child at last year's Sundance Film Festival.

Its creator Eric Mendelsohn won Best Director in Park City, but went home without a distribution deal -- which is the undeclared movie meat market's unspoken parting gift for award winners.

Then along came indie house Shooting Gallery, which has made this movie the flagship release for a touring series of six pictures the distributor feels went unfairly unnoticed during their festival tours.

Continue reading: Judy Berlin Review

Sunshine State Review


Good

Another utterly captivating John Sayles ensemble piece with an incredible sense of a particular place and its personality, "Sunshine State" manifests the winds of change and uncertainty blowing mightily over a humble island township off the Florida panhandle that has been targeted for ravenous resort development.

Like "Lone Star," "Limbo" and other films from the iconic independent writer-director, this one transports you into the soul of its community through smaller pieces of the whole. Sayles paints a larger picture through the lives of individual denizens who are each struggling with a choice between the rich heritage of their fading pocket berg and the big money being offered by developers.

Some are rediscovering a spiritual connection to the town, like Angela Bassett, who plays a refugee from the island's black community, which made the place thrive in the 1940s before its culture began fading away with desegregation. She couldn't get away fast enough as a teenager -- although that might have been because she was pregnant and her parents were sending her away whether she liked it or not. She became an actress but never made it past infomercials. Now she has returned to visit her estranged mother (Mary Alice) for the first time with her handsome, affluent new husband (James McDaniel) on her arm.

Continue reading: Sunshine State Review

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Edie Falco Movies

Megan Leavey Trailer

Megan Leavey Trailer

Megan Leavey is a young US Marine corporal who has never been brilliant at connecting...

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The Comedian Trailer

The Comedian Trailer

Once, Jackie Burke was one of the biggest names in town; he was a comedian...

Freedom Land Trailer

Freedom Land Trailer

Revolution Studios' powerful drama Freedomland is a highly charged and gritty mystery of a carjacking,...

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Freedomland Movie Review

Freedomland Movie Review

Unless you've burned through Richard Price's 1998 novel Freedomland, it's tough to pinpoint which direction...

Sunshine State Movie Review

Sunshine State Movie Review

One prominent theme has run through the recent work of maverick filmmaker John Sayles: the...

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