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Point Break Has Been Rebooted - But Will The Remake Be Any Good?


Luke Bracey Edgar Ramirez

It’s the cursed question that every movie remake has to go through - can it step out of the shadow of its predecessor? For fans of the original 1991 action crime film Point Break - complete with Patrick Swayze and Keanu Reeves, the epitome of 90s Hollywood stars - a revamp was always going to be a tough call as the original cult classic is widely perceived to be one of the stand-alone greats.

Point BreakPoint Break has got a whole new cast in this remake of a classic

Director Ericson Core has decided to shoulder the responsibility and reboot the thriller and the trailer suggests he’s determined to get the adrenaline going.

Continue reading: Point Break Has Been Rebooted - But Will The Remake Be Any Good?

'Point Break' Remake: What We Know So Far


Luke Bracey Ray Winstone Edgar Ramirez Patrick Swayze Keanu Reeves

So, it looks like the Point Break remake is set for release in August 2015. Directed by Ericson Core, whose only other big directing job was 2006’s Invincible starring Mark Wahlberg, the new script has been written by Total Recall remake co-writer Kurt Wimmer.  There's a whole lot of action movie experience going on there, which is a promising start.  Core was also the director of photography for The Fast and the Furious way back in 2001, so we've got faith his visuals will be pretty impressive - that's for sure.

Luke Bracey Point Break remake Luke Bracey has been cast as Johnny Utah in Point Break, a role originally played by Keanu Reeves

The 2015 remake is pegged to be an unofficial reboot of The Hurt Locker director Kathryn Bigelow’s 1991 film of the same name, which starred Keanu Reeves as an ex-quarterback-turned-FBI-agent and Patrick Swayze as a system fighting surfer.  After it's suspected that a gang of bank robbers, nicknamed 'The Ex-Presidents,' are potentially a group of surfers, Agent Utah is sent in to infiltrate their group.

Continue reading: 'Point Break' Remake: What We Know So Far

Edgar Ramirez Replacing Gerard Butler in 'Point Break' Reboot


Edgar Ramirez Gerard Butler Keanu Reeves

The ‘Point Break’ remake finally has its Bohdi as Edgar Ramirez takes over the role from Gerard Butler. The film, which will retain the original story of an FBI agent infiltrating a ring of criminals but will be set in the world of extreme sports, is set for release on August 7 2015.

Edgar RamirezEdgar Ramirez kisses his ALMA award

Variety had the scoop, writing: “Alcon has been looking for someone to take over the role of Bodhi — played by Patrick Swayze in the ’1991 original — after Butler exited the project over a scheduling conflict, and looks to have found his successor in the “Carlos” star.”

Continue reading: Edgar Ramirez Replacing Gerard Butler in 'Point Break' Reboot

The Counselor Review


Weak

This film proves that all the right ingredients don't necessarily make a movie work. Even with top-drawer filmmakers and actors, this dramatic thriller simply never grabs our interest. It looks great, and everyone is giving it their all, but the story and characters remain so badly undefined that we can't identify with either.

The story's set on the US-Mexico border, where a slick lawyer (Fassbender) known as "the Counsellor" has slightly too much going on in his life. He has just proposed to his dream woman Laura (Cruz), while he's planning to open a nightclub with Reiner (Bardem). For extra cash, he's organising a massive cocaine shipment with Westray (Pitt). And it's this drug deal that goes wrong, creating a mess that engulfs Reiner and Laura, as well as Reiner's shrewd girlfriend Malkina (Diaz). As his life collapses around him, the Counsellor scrambles to salvage what he can, even as he realises that it'll be a miracle if anyone survives.

There are problems at every level of this production. McCarthy's first original script is simply too literary, putting verbose dialog into the actors mouths that never sounds like people talking to each other. Fassbender and Bardem are good enough to get away with this, but Pitt and Diaz struggle. Both Fassbender and Cruz bring out some wrenching emotions in their scenes, but their characters are never much more than cardboard cutouts. In fact, no one in this story feels like a fully fleshed-out person. And the little we know about each character makes most of them fairly unlikeable.

Continue reading: The Counselor Review

Picture - Edgar Ramirez , Thursday 10th January 2013

Edgar Ramirez Santa Monica, California, United States 18th Annual Critics' Choice Movie Awards held at Barker Hangar - Arrivals Thursday 10th January 2013

Edgar Ramirez

Picture - Edgar Ramirez , Wednesday 7th November 2012

Edgar Ramirez and Grauman's Chinese Theatre Grauman's Chinese Theatre in Hollywood attends the 2012 AFI FEST - "Zaytoun" Premiere - Arrivals Wednesday 7th November 2012

Edgar Ramirez and Grauman's Chinese Theatre

Picture - Edgar Ramirez , Wednesday 7th November 2012

Edgar Ramirez Wednesday 7th November 2012 arrives at the "Zaytoun" AFI Screening at Graumans Chinese Theater

Edgar Ramirez

Picture - Edgar Ramirez , Sunday 16th September 2012

Edgar Ramirez Sunday 16th September 2012 2012 NCLR ALMA Awards, held at Pasadena Civic Auditorium - Arrivals

Picture - Edgar Ramirez , Sunday 16th September 2012

Edgar Ramirez Sunday 16th September 2012 2012 NCLR ALMA Awards, held at Pasadena Civic Auditorium - Press Room

Edgar Ramirez

Wrath of the Titans Review


OK

While this sequel is just as loud and chaotic as 2010's Clash of the Titans remake, it's also considerably more fun due to some exhilarating action and a refreshing sense of humour. It also looks amazing in 3D on an Imax screen.

Years later, the now-widowed hero Perseus (Worthington) is trying to live as an anonymous fisherman with his pre-teen son Helius (Bell). Then he hears about stirrings of a coming calamity. Indeed, his father Zeus (Neeson) has been kidnapped by Hades (Fiennes) and Ares (Ramirez) as pat of a plan to release Zeus and Hades' evil father Kronos from the underworld. So Perseus teams up with Queen Andromeda (Pike) and rogue demigod Agenor (Kebbell), son of Poseidon (Huston), to rescue his father and stop his brother, uncle and grandfather.

Yes, this is one seriously dysfunctional family, as four generations of men set out to either destroy the world or save it. To be honest, it's never clear why Hades and Ares are so hellbent, as it were, on cataclysmic destruction, but at least this also allows for changing alliances as the story progresses. Not that there's much story, really, as the plot essentially just links a series of action set-pieces.

Fortunately, most of these sequences are entertaining enough to keep us gripped. Highlights include a rather fabulous dragon attack and a desperate, full-on fight with cyclops-giants in a forest. Less convincing are a convoluted underworld rescue-battle and the climactic assault on the volcano-sized Kronos, who rains down fire and destruction rather selectively. (There's also the problem of how the filmmakers can top Kronos in the probable sequel.)

Along the way, there are some refreshing moments of deranged humour, mainly in Kebbell's snarky dialog, Pike's sharp glances and a particularly colourful turn by Nighy (as super-spear smelter Hephaestus). But as the story progresses, there's more than a whiff of Lord of the Rings (the fires of Mount Doom, plus some pointless two-torsoed Orc-a-likes), Harry Potter (the three-pronged Deathly Hallows) and even Star Wars (all that father-son angst). But filmmaker Liebesman keeps things moving briskly, wowing us with so much eye-candy that we just sit back and enjoy the rickety ride for what it is.

Carlos Review


Good
Edited down from the five-and-a-half hour original version (which is also available), this nearly three-hour film still feels like an episodic TV series as it covers two decades in the life of the notorious terrorist. But it's expertly made and very well-acted, and some sequences are sharply involving.

When he enters the pro-Palestine terrorist cause in the early 1970s, Venezuelan-born Ilich Sanchez (Ramirez) takes the name "Carlos". For the next 20 years he's one of the most feared figures in Europe, organising attacks and then hiding out in Yemen, Syria and Sudan, or anywhere else he can find asylum.

From assassinations to bombings to hijackings, he earns his reputation for ruthlessness but also alienates his boss (Kaabour) by refusing to take orders.

Continue reading: Carlos Review

The Bourne Ultimatum Review


OK
There are actually three screenwriters credited for The Bourne Ultimatum, though it's hard to imagine what exactly they all did to earn their paycheck. "You don't remember anything, do you?" "It's Bourne." "It ends here." [insert car chase] That doesn't mean that this third installment of the popular shaky-cam travelogue spy thriller series doesn't deliver all that it's intended to, and occasionally more, it just means that you're more likely to hear barked-out commands or the sound of squealing tires and shattering glass than two or more actors exchanging full sentences as part of a conversation. This is a film that asks exactly how much traditional storytelling structure can you cleave away and still have a coherent and engaging piece of work? The answer: Nearly all of it.

Coming off last year's abysmally underrated United 93, director Paul Greengrass thankfully returns for his second film in the series about the titular amnesiac CIA-trained assassin (Matt Damon) with identity issues. Although the resulting film is not nearly up to the hard-to-match bar set by the preceding film, The Bourne Supremacy, it's hard to imagine any other director currently working who would be able to keep the relentless pace delivered by Ultimatum. Unfortunately, it's also all too easy to see that the filmmakers and Damon are coasting when they could be soaring.

Continue reading: The Bourne Ultimatum Review

Domino Review


Terrible
The opening text of Domino informs the viewer that the film is based on a true story "sort of." It should also inform the viewer that it makes sense, entertains, and maintains focus on its main character "sort of." What it does far more consistently is annoy, disappoint, and remind the viewer of far better films they could be spending their time watching.

The story, very loosely based on the exploits of female bounty hunter Domino Harvey (Keira Knightley), follows our heroine as she grows dissatisfied with her socialite upbringing and embraces the darker side of law enforcement. Her mentor on this journey is legendary bounty hunter Ed Mosbey (Mickey Rourke), assisted by pseudo-comic relief Choco (Edgar Ramirez). That she meets these gentlemen as they try to scam hundreds of dollars off of would-be bounty hunters (including herself) doesn't dissuade her from trusting them with her new life.

Continue reading: Domino Review

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