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Eternity Calvin Klein announces new global advertising campaign and the return of Christy Turlington Burns to the house, with husband Ed Burns

Christy Turlington Burns and Ed Burns - Calvin Klein has announced its new global advertising campaign for ETERNITY Calvin Klein, to debut in June 2014. The campaign heralds the return of model and maternal health advocate Christy Turlington Burns, the original face of ETERNITY Calvin Klein, alongside her husband, writer, director and actor Ed Burns. Shot on location in stunning Turks & Caicos, the new ETERNITY Calvin Klein campaign features the couple as they share intimate moments on a quiet beach. Turlington Burns and Burns will also appear in an advertising campaign for ETERNITY NIGHT Calvin Klein, a new creamy floral fragrance, and ETERNITY NIGHT Calvin Klein for men, a new woody fougere fragrance, set to launch globally in August 2014. For the advertising visuals, they are shown in a serene beach setting captured at twilight. Both the new ETERNITY Calvin Klein and ETERNITY NIGHT Calvin Klein advertising campaigns were shot by renowned photographers Inez Van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matatin, and directed by Trey Laird of Laird + Partners in conjunction with Calvin Klein's in-house ad agency and creative studio. "I am so grateful for the support of Every Mother Counts and thrilled to be back representing this brand along with my husband. This is my new favorite ETERNITY Calvin Klein campaign of all time," said Turlington Burns. "ETERNITY Calvin Klein has remained a top-selling global fragrance brand and is still as relevant as when it launched 25 years ago," said Steve Mormoris, Senior Vice President of American Fragrances, Coty Prestige. "Christy is synonymous with the house, and featuring her alongside Ed was a natural choice, because together they perfectly capture the spirit of eternal love." Tom Murry, Chief Executive Officer of Calvin Klein, Inc., said, "We are thrilled to continue the house's longstanding relationship with Christy, while welcoming Ed into Calvin Klein's ever-evolving legacy of iconic advertising visuals. Christy and Ed are the ideal couple to represen - Tuesday 13th May 2014

Christy Turlington Burns and Ed Burns

'Charles James: Beyond Fashion' Costume Institute Gala

Christy Turlington and Ed Burns - 'Charles James: Beyond Fashion' Costume Institute Gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art - Arrivals - Mantattan, New York, United States - Monday 5th May 2014

The Eighth Annual Tribeca/ESPN Sports Film Festival Kick-off 'When the Garden' at BMCC Theater

Ed Burns - The Eighth Annual Tribeca/ESPN Sports Film Festival Kick-off With the World Premiere of the ESPN Films' 30 for 30 Documentary When the Garden at BMCC Theater - NYC, New York, United States - Thursday 17th April 2014

Ed Burns takes his children to school

Ed Burns, Grace Burns and Finn Burns - Ed Burns takes his children to school - Manhattan, New York, United States - Thursday 5th December 2013

Ed Burns, Grace Burns and Finn Burns
Ed Burns and Grace Burns
Ed Burns, Grace Burns and Finn Burns
Ed Burns, Grace Burns and Finn Burns
Ed Burns and Grace Burns

Ed Burns On The School Run

Ed Burns and Finn Burns - Ed Burns takes his son Finn to school - New York City, United States - Wednesday 4th December 2013

Ed Burns and Finn Burns
Ed Burns and Finn Burns
Ed Burns and Finn Burns
Ed Burns and Finn Burns
Ed Burns and Finn Burns

What's in 'Mob City' for 'Walking Dead' Fans?


Ed Burns Frank Darabont

Walking Dead writer and director Frank Darabont is already onto his next project, and you might have assumed he'd have gone in the exact opposite direction. But Darabont sees many similarities between the AMC show and his new series Mob City.

Mob CityIs Frank Darabont's 'Mob City' The Next Big Thing?

But this time, you can sit back and relax, knowing no zombies are going to jump out at you. Fans of the Walking Dead know that the un-dead are only secondary to the human drama, and Darabont said that is what he brings to both shows.

Continue reading: What's in 'Mob City' for 'Walking Dead' Fans?

TNT's Upcoming "Mob City" To "Air" First Episode Over Twitter - 140 Characters At A Time


Jon Bernthal Milo Ventimiglia Ed Burns

Social media isn’t on the rise any more, it’s booming and taking over in new and creative ways, as TNT’s promotional stunt for their upcoming Mob City demonstrates. The channel will promote its “three-week television event,” by tweeting out the script for the first episode, in its entirety, 140 characters at a time.

Jon Bernthal, Expo Canada
Jon Bernthal stars in this inovative (at least in its promotion) drama.

We wouldn’t worry about spoilers though, since even followers of the show’s Twitter (@MobCityTNT) probably won’t be able to keep up with the hundreds of statuses this is bound to produce. The “adaptweetion” will go live line by line, two days before the premiere, the network has announced, via Deadline. The project, a collaboration between TNT and Deutsch NY is a 1940s period series, focusing on 1940s Los Angeles.

Continue reading: TNT's Upcoming "Mob City" To "Air" First Episode Over Twitter - 140 Characters At A Time

Frank Darabont's New Mob Drama Gets Premiere Date, New Title And Trailer


Ed Burns Frank Darabont Neal McDonough Simon Pegg

Mob City is filmmaker Frank Darabont's take on the novel L.A. Noir: The Struggle For The Soul Of America’s Most Seductive City - a detailed account of post-World War II Los Angeles gripped by corrupt police and a rampant organised crime network. On Tuesday (13 August) TNT announced that the show will be airing on the network on Wednesday 4 December, also revealing a shiny new title and a shiny new trailer to go with the announcement.

Neal McDonough
Neal McDonough's Willaim Parker will try to rid LA of organised crime in the series

The show - originally title Lost Angels - follows the mostly fact-based story of Los Angeles darkest periods; a time when a corrupt police force do little to curtail the gains of the violent criminal world it should be controlling, as it further cements LA as the hub of organised criminal activity on the West Coast. Arriving in the city to free it from this scourge of criminal activity is Police Chief William Parker (Neal McDonough), who has made it his mission to make Los Angeles a city where people can feel safe to walk the streets again.

Continue reading: Frank Darabont's New Mob Drama Gets Premiere Date, New Title And Trailer

Video - Ed Burns And Caitlin Fitzgerald Filmed On Location In Tribeca


Ed Burns and Caitlin Fitzgerald attend a press junket for their movie "Newlyweds" at IDPR Studios in New York. Ed talks about how the film wasn't shot on set but rather on location in Tribeca, Manhattan, in front of perplexed people. Naturally, the pair has entertaining stories about shooting in a 'live environment', such as filming in a bar that hadn't been closed especially for the filming.

Ed Burns also directed Newlyweds, as well as star in it. He will be starring in a film adaptation of I, Alex Cross, alongside Tyler Perry and Rachel Nichols. I, Alex Cross is a novel by James Patterson

Generation Kill Review


Excellent
In their seven-part Iraq War miniseries adaptation of Evan Wright's book Generation Kill, David Simon and Ed Burns roll up a quiverful of arrows to fire off at various topics, ranging from the rampaging adrenaline of young men at war to the supreme idiocy of the invasion itself. However, the bright and gleaming theme running through most of these hard-bitten episodes has the filmmakers illustrating an age-old military maxim: Soldiers are often much more likely to be killed by the decisions of their submoronic leadership than they are by actions undertaken by the enemy. When that enemy is as pathetic a force as Saddam's Republican Guard, and the American officer corps obsessed more with the idea of taking Baghdad at warp speed than properly clearing the territory they're pushing through (both points made time and again in this series), that maxim is even more true than usual.

Wright was a Rolling Stone reporter who somehow got himself embedded in the First Recon Marine unit that was frequently at the very point of the entire American military machine rolling into Iraq in 2003. In the capable hands of Simon and Burns, his story of these turbo-trained alpha-male hunter-killers becomes something unlike most any other film project about the war. It opens in the sands of Kuwait, with the platoons tussling in the sand like overgrown boys, primed with teeth-bared intensity to launch themselves at Saddam's forces; only, in the manner of Jarhead, that great battle never quite seems to come.

Continue reading: Generation Kill Review

Entourage: Season Three, Part Two Review


OK
It's next to impossible to discuss the HBO series Entourage without comparing it to the network's other series. You can call it a careerist fantasy that shows what the perfect life would be if one could leave nowhere, Queens, for Hollywood and attain fame and fortune without having to leave your boys behind; a guide to achieving that perfect merging of escapist wealth and friendship, like Sex and the City for men. Or you can go the Curb Your Enthusiasm route by saying the show similarly limns, with minute and quite expertly calibrated precision, the highs and lows nervy East Coasters living the sun-dappled entertainment industry life, with all its quicksand terrors and neurotic joys (Entourage being more interested in the upside, obviously, than the uber-pessimistic Enthusiasm); they even both feature high-tension scenes during temple services. Entourage even shares a certain similarity with The Sopranos in its eerily dead-on pop culture references -- not to mention particularly grating theme songs. The show has a mimic quality that allows it to somehow slide underneath the cultural radar without attracting the same kind of heat as those other touchstone shows. That is, the popularity of Entourage isn't then necessarily written up in magazines and op-ed pages as a sign of (fill in the blank); it arrives with low expectations and leaves a half-hour later, those expectations most always met, with a little change to spare.

That's not to say that HBO doesn't know how to get the most out of its most Maxim-reader-friendly property, a fact perfectly well displayed in the channel's decision to split up the DVD release of season three into two parts, nicely maximizing revenue. The second part, containing the piddling last eight episodes on two discs, is barely enough to get you through a long and dreary Saturday, but is nevertheless a worthy distraction from the messy realities of life.

Continue reading: Entourage: Season Three, Part Two Review

The Wire: Season Five Review


Extraordinary
Millions of hearts broke when season four of The Wire reached its bleak conclusion. The cause of this mass cardiac disintegration was twofold: first, most of the teenage boys in the season's primary storyline seemed doomed to nasty and short lives. And second, the single greatest work of dramatic television in the history of the medium had come to an end. That couldn't be easy for anyone's emotions.

Fifteen months later, The Wire returned for its brilliant swan song. David Simon, Ed Burns, and crew famously dedicated each season of The Wire to an institutional failure (the drug war, the middle class, political reform, the schools) that has contributed to the extended death of Baltimore, and by extension all of America's inner cities. For the show's final go-round, the show takes on the decline of local media. Simon spent years -- several of them tumultuous -- at the Baltimore Sun before he started creating amazing TV shows. Naturally, Simon brings much of his personal disaffection and melancholy to his portrayal of that disintegrating daily.

Continue reading: The Wire: Season Five Review

27 Dresses Review


Terrible
Occasionally cute but consistently dim-witted, the romantic comedy 27 Dresses suffers the same number of generic clichés as it glides down the aisles toward a resolution that's as predictable as a wedding band's set list. Celebrate good times? Don't bet on it.

But don't blame the leads. Last year's breakout charmers Katherine Heigl (Knocked Up) and James Marsden (Hairspray, Enchanted) almost salvage this shabby, flabby date movie. He displays impressive comedic timing, and she shows off her deep reservoir of charm. If Knocked marked the arrival of a new rom-com starlet, Dresses at least proves Hollywood's relationship with Heigl is built to last.

Continue reading: 27 Dresses Review

The Wire: Season Four Review


Essential
By the end of season three of The Wire -- aka HBO's best excuse for staying on the air -- one could sense that the show had, in some sense of the word, come to an end. It was certainly clear for a time that HBO executives thought so, having come close to canceling the multifaceted, frighteningly addictive urban drama yet again, as it never pulled anywhere near the kind of ratings that their warhorses like The Sopranos and Sex and the City had. Although plenty of strings were left dangling at the conclusion of episode 37, "Mission Accomplished," a chapter had been definitively closed, with Avon Barksdale back in jail, and his brainy partner Stringer Belle gunned down. Since the two of them had been the impressive foils to the strung-out cops in the Baltimore Major Crimes Unit, their departure seemed to leave a vacuum. With nobody of real consequence running the West Baltimore drug trade (the Barksdales' chief rival and replacement, Marlo Stanfield, seems at first nothing more than some punk kid), what would be left that was worth watching?

More than enough, it turns out.

Continue reading: The Wire: Season Four Review

Entourage: Season Three, Part Two Review


OK
It's next to impossible to discuss the HBO series Entourage without comparing it to the network's other series. You can call it a careerist fantasy that shows what the perfect life would be if one could leave nowhere, Queens, for Hollywood and attain fame and fortune without having to leave your boys behind; a guide to achieving that perfect merging of escapist wealth and friendship, like Sex and the City for men. Or you can go the Curb Your Enthusiasm route by saying the show similarly limns, with minute and quite expertly calibrated precision, the highs and lows nervy East Coasters living the sun-dappled entertainment industry life, with all its quicksand terrors and neurotic joys (Entourage being more interested in the upside, obviously, than the uber-pessimistic Enthusiasm); they even both feature high-tension scenes during temple services. Entourage even shares a certain similarity with The Sopranos in its eerily dead-on pop culture references -- not to mention particularly grating theme songs. The show has a mimic quality that allows it to somehow slide underneath the cultural radar without attracting the same kind of heat as those other touchstone shows. That is, the popularity of Entourage isn't then necessarily written up in magazines and op-ed pages as a sign of (fill in the blank); it arrives with low expectations and leaves a half-hour later, those expectations most always met, with a little change to spare.

That's not to say that HBO doesn't know how to get the most out of its most Maxim-reader-friendly property, a fact perfectly well displayed in the channel's decision to split up the DVD release of season three into two parts, nicely maximizing revenue. The second part, containing the piddling last eight episodes on two discs, is barely enough to get you through a long and dreary Saturday, but is nevertheless a worthy distraction from the messy realities of life.

Continue reading: Entourage: Season Three, Part Two Review

Ed Burns

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