Ed Asner

Ed Asner

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The 19th Annual PRISM Awards Ceremony

Ed Asner - The 19th Annual PRISM Awards Ceremony at The Skirball Cultural Center - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 16th July 2015

Ed Asner
Ed Asner
Ed Asner
Ed Asner
Ed Asner

'Cool Comedy - Hot Cuisine' benefit

Ed Asner - 'Cool Comedy - Hot Cuisine' benefit at the Beverly Wilshire Four Seasons Hotel - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 6th June 2015

Ed Asner
Ed Asner

L.A. Theatre Works 40th Anniversary Gala

Ed Asner - L.A. Theatre Works 40th Anniversary Gala at The Beverly Hilton Hotel at The Beverly Hilton, Beverly Hilton Hotel - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Thursday 26th March 2015

Actor Ed Asner arrives at LAX airport

Ed Asner - Actor Ed Asner poses for a selfie as he arrives at LAX airport in Los Angeles - Hollywood, California, United States - Friday 23rd January 2015

Ed Asner

Hallmark TCA Winter 2015 Party

Ed Asner and Liza Asner - Hallmark TCA Winter 2015 Party at Tournament House - Pasadena, California, United States - Friday 9th January 2015

Ed Asner

'Reports of My Imminent Demise Are Greatly Exaggerated' - Ed Asner Calls For Calm After 911 Call


Ed Asner

On Tuesday night (March 12, 2013), Ed Asner became disorientated during his one-man show, FDR and a 911 call brought the paramedics to the Marquette Pavilion in Gary. According to Chicago Sun-Times, the show started around 45 minutes late and while he was onstage, Asner appeared to have difficulty breathing and was struggling with his lines. After around 15 minutes, backstage staff had intervened and Asner left the stage, where he was treated by paramedics.

Headlines regarding the incident blamed “exhaustion” (Chicago Sun-Times) and described the 83 year old as “disorientated,” (Daily Mail) where others described his behaviour as “worrisome” (Fox News). However, Asner himself was quick to quell any alarm that had developed over the situation and tweeted a message to say “Reports of my imminent demise are greatly exaggerated. They tell me I am suffering from exhaustion. Thanks for the good wishes!” A representative for Asner told USA Today that he had been taken to a Chicago hospital, where he was “resting comfortably.”

Asner is best known for his roles in the Mary Tyler Moore show and its spin-off Lou Grant and has recently been touring the country, playing the role of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, in FDR for over three years. 

Continue reading: 'Reports of My Imminent Demise Are Greatly Exaggerated' - Ed Asner Calls For Calm After 911 Call

Hollywood Veteran Ed Asner Hospitalised After Cancelled Performance


Ed Asner

Hollywood veteran Ed Asner was hospitalized on Tuesday night, after having to cut short his sold-out performance in Gary, Indiana.

Asner, 83, best known for his role as Lou Grant on the “Mary Tyler Moore Show” had to be rushed off-stage in the middle of his portratayal of Franklin Delano Roosevelt in the one man show FDR. It is as yet unclear what the cause of the problem was. According to an audience member, he appeared confused and was not speaking clearly. The problem had started right before the show, apparently, since earlier in the evening, Asner had appeared in good health, when he conducted an acting class elsewhere in Gary.

Medical personnel arrived on the scene quickly and the performance was cut short. Asner also has other performances scheduled across the country, but it is presently unclear whether they will be cancelled or not. Currently, the actor is still recovering in a hospital in the Chicago area, but no other announcements have been made about his condition. A rep for Asner later released the statement that he had been suffering from exhaustion and was now resting comfortably.

Continue reading: Hollywood Veteran Ed Asner Hospitalised After Cancelled Performance

Paul Rudd and Ed Asner Find 'Grace' On Stage


Paul Rudd Ed Asner Michael Shannon

Paul Rudd isn't often associated with words such as 'Grace' or, for that matter, 'tact', with roles in great contemporary-classic comedies such as 'Anchorman', 'Forgetting Sarah Marshall', or in the flop 'Dinner For Schmucks', but it seems that Broadway's 'Grace', in which he's currently starring, is exactly what Rudd needed bring attention to his own grace. Plus, his pairing with Ed Asner (Disney Pixar's 'Up') in this brand new American four person stage-play, that also stars Michael Shannon ('Boardwalk Empire', 'Revolutionary Road') and Kate Arrington (Broadway veteran), certainly seems like a match made in heaven.

'Grace' has been described on Playbill.com: "In alternating scenes of hilarity and poignancy, life turns surreal for an eclectic foursome whose destinies collide in the Sunshine State... A wide-eyed young couple (Rudd & Arrington) head south with big plans to open a chain of Gospel-themed motels. When an agitated rocket scientist (Shannon) and a prickly pest-control man (Asner) enter the picture, the couple's ordered world is thrown into utter chaos."

In response as to whether this 'utter chaos' finds any kind of aesthetic stage value one tweeter said of 'Grace': "It's brilliant. It made me laugh, cry and contemplate grace. Ed Asner is a national treasure." To celebrate the play and its themes, a whole host of special events have been organised around it, included a series of three 'talkback' evenings. October 10th, 17th and 24th will see a variety of speakers from critics, members of the cast as well as members of the clergy meet to discuss themes of the play, focussing particularly on the aspects of faith that it probes.

Continue reading: Paul Rudd and Ed Asner Find 'Grace' On Stage

Up Review


Excellent
Like Wall-E, this Pixar-produced feature has an unusual structure that continually keeps us off guard. It also tells a story that's refreshingly mature, with moments of heartbreaking sadness and quiet contemplation. Along with the talking dogs and big action scenes.

Since he was a boy, Carl (voiced by Asner) has been obsessed with adventure, following the exploits of the larger-than-life explorer Muntz (Plummer). And Carl shared this yearning with his wife Ellie, although the circumstances of life meant that they never achieved their dream to travel to Muntz' famed Paradise Falls in South America. Now a widower, Carl is finally spurred to action, using helium balloons to fly his house away. But he has company in the form of the eager Russell (Nagai), and they make several strange discoveries in South America.

Continue reading: Up Review

Up Review


Good
Film critics experience varying degrees of disappointment. Terminator Salvation, for example, disappoints because it's terrible and shouldn't have been made, let alone released. The ironically titled Up, on the other hand, disappoints because it doesn't soar quite as high as its acclaimed Pixar predecessors. Holding each new Pixar flick up to such lofty expectations sounds unfair until you realize the animation factory's outstanding features routinely meet the studio's admittedly sky-high quality bar. And some -- like last year's WALL-E, a very tough act to follow -- raise the bar to even dizzier heights.

Up doesn't manage that. It's good, not great, Pixar -- an elegant and somber reflection on life's unfinished business and our tendencies to put even the biggest dreams on the shelf. And as we discovered with Cars, The Incredibles, and Ratatouille, even good Pixar trumps traditional animation from rival studios, and certainly deserves your time.

Continue reading: Up Review

El Dorado Review


Extraordinary
Howard Hawks's penultimate film is a canny reshuffling of his own Rio Bravo as he performs a loose and extended mediation on his favorite themes of loyalty and professionalism.

John Wayne plays Cole Thornton, a gun for hire claiming a job with a land-grabbing cattle baron (Ed Asner). Cole accepts the job until he finds out that his old pal J.P. Harrah (Robert Mitchum, in one of his finest late career performances) is the town sheriff. Cole switches sides but not before being shot by a put-upon rancher's daughter, Joey (Michele Carey), who thinks Cole is still working for Jason. With the bullet lodged near his spine, Cole rejects a risky operation and leaves town looking for work. A year later, Cole returns to town with a young, firebrand partner, Mississippi (James Caan), in tow to find that Jason has hired a legendary gang of gunslingers to force Joey's family off their ranch. Cole also discovers J.P. has deteriorated into a pathetic joke of a drunk after being thrown over by a dame (and Mitchum is not short of harrowing in his efforts to fight back his demons). But Jason's hired guns won't quit, so Cole along with Mississippi and J.P.'s obnoxious deputy Bull (Arthur Hunnicutt) try to head off the gang of hired guns. At the same time, Cole helps J.P. to pull out of his drunken stupor and regain his professionalism.

Continue reading: El Dorado Review

Elf Review


Extraordinary
On Christmas Eve, an infant crawls into Santa's sack and hitches a ride back to the North Pole. Upon finding his imported cargo, Santa passes the bundle of joy off to a paternal elf (played with care by Bob Newhart), who names the baby Buddy and raises him up to be a full-sized man in a miniature world.

The one-joke premise becomes worlds funnier once we learn that the elf in question is played with positively-charged whimsy by Will Ferrell. Best known for his ensemble work in Saturday Night Live and Old School, Ferrell has chosen the ideal project to test his skills as a leading man. And he keeps his clothes on, which means all ages are welcome (and encouraged) to attend this holiday party.

Continue reading: Elf Review

The Animal Review


Good
It's always a shame when good comedic talent goes bad, and a pleasant surprise when that finally lands a decent role in a funny film. Nothing has been expected of Rob Schneider since his departure from the hellhole of mind-numbing roles like the Copy Guy Richmeister and the Weed Guy on Saturday Night Live, as well as bit parts in ridiculous Muppet Movie sequels and Adam Sandler comedies. But Rob Schneider is a funny man. I remember watching him at the Improv in San Diego when I was 12 years old and laughing my ass off at his brilliant portrayal of Elvis on a fishhook. I was 12, but what the hey?

Modern comedy comes from its ability to not take its story or its characters seriously. The Farrelly brothers and Woody Allen have taught us that. Recent failures like Joe Dirt and Schneider's last film Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo owe themselves to a seriousness they try to create by treating their main characters as martyrs for the audience to sympathize with and pity. The Animal does no such thing, avoiding this common mistake totally and developing into an enjoyable and hilarious 90 minutes.

Continue reading: The Animal Review

Ed Asner

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