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Annual Benefit Gala

EG Daily - Beverly Hilton Hotel Beverly Hills at Beverly Hilton Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 25th October 2015

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Last Chance For Animals (LCA) Annual Benefit Gala

EG Daily - Last Chance for Animals (LCA) Annual Benefit Gala - Arrivals at Beverly Hilton Hotel - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Saturday 24th October 2015

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The Human Rights Hero Awards 2015

EG Daily - The Human Rights Hero Awards 2015 presented by Marisol Nichols' Foundation for a Slavery Free World and Youth for Human Rights International at Beso at Beso - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 21st September 2015

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'Joseph And The Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat' Los Angeles Premiere

EG Daily - 'Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat' Los Angeles premiere at the Pantages Theater Hollywood - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 6th June 2014

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Opening Night Of 'Priscilla Queen Of The Desert'

EG Daily - Opening night of 'Priscilla Queen of the Desert' at the Pantages Theatre - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 29th May 2013

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Happy Feet 2 - Trailer & Featurette


While the Emperor penguins of Antarctica find their mate by singing their 'heartsong', Mumble is different. Instead of singing, he has a talent for tap-dancing and it was this that won the affections of his old friend Gloria. His unique gift also helped ban overfishing in Antarctica which saved the fish population from extinction.

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The Devil's Rejects Review


Excellent
House of 1000 Corpses, the last song on Rob Zombie's 2001 album The Sinister Urge, also served as the title track to the metal frontman-turned-filmmaker's 2003 directorial debut, but the cut's country twang-inflected ghoulishness would have made a more apt musical accompaniment for Zombie's The Devil's Rejects. Less a sequel than a spiritual follow-up, the director's latest revisits House's serial-killing Firefly clan as they're cast into the backwater dustbowls of rural America by a sheriff (William Forsythe) intent on exacting vigilante revenge for the murder of his brother. A gritty Western-via-grindhouse modern exploitation flick imbued with the ferocity of independent '70s horror, Zombie's splatterfest wisely alters virtually everything (narratively, stylistically, thematically) that characterized his campy, cartoonish and awkward first film. And from its coarse, graphic visual aesthetic, profusion of classic Southern rock tunes, and portrait of unrepentant mayhem, his film reverentially exults in the deranged spirit and impulsive, unpredictable energy of seminal genre masterpieces The Texas Chain Saw Massacre and The Hills Have Eyes.

The Devil's Rejects diverges from its predecessor beginning with its opening frames, in which the depiction of the Firefly residence - no longer a remote, forest-shrouded funhouse of horrors but, rather, a dilapidated structure situated in a stretch of open land - speaks to the film's rejection of atmospheric claustrophobia in favor of wide-open anarchy. A fascination with rampant disorder certainly fuels the tour de force intro sequence, a bullet-strewn siege on the Firefly home by Sheriff Wydell (Forsythe) and an army of police officers heightened by Zombie's sly use of freeze frames, Sergio Leone-esque close-ups, and The Allman Brothers' "Midnight Rider." Exhibiting a directorial maturity devoid of his former MTV-ish gimmickry (no hyper-edited montages with varying film stocks or bludgeoning industrial heavy metal here), the director orchestrates the chaotic events with feverish abandon, his shaky handheld camera set-ups and scraggly, sun-bleached cinematography (courtesy of Phil Parmet) placing us directly inside the carnage. By the time murderous siblings Otis (Bill Moseley) and Baby (Sheri Moon) escape their now overrun home to seek shelter in the rotting, blindingly white desert, Zombie has demonstrated a newfound adeptness at lacing nasty action with a breakneck thrust and vicious wit.

Continue reading: The Devil's Rejects Review

Pee-wee's Big Adventure Review


Excellent
Arguably Tim Burton's strangest film, about a now iconic guy who never managed to grow up. The love of his life is his pimped-out red bicycle, and when it gets stolen, it sends Pee-wee (Paul Reubens) on the biggest adventure of his life, from the plains of the midwest to the lots of Hollywood. Rent this film, and tell 'em Large Marge sent ya!

Fandango Review


Excellent
Kevin Costner didn't get his start in Fandango, but he might as well have. This classic comedy gave us an early-career Costner as head of the "Groovers," a band of five roommates who decide to take one quick road trip after graduating from The University of Texas in 1971 -- only to find the spectre of Vietnam (and marriage) waiting for them in a matter of days.

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The Powerpuff Girls Movie Review


Good
The Motion Picture Association of America, in their policy to specify why a movie receives its rating, gave a PG to the animated feature The Powerpuff Girls Movie for this reason: "non-stop frenetic animated action." Boy, they got that right. Based on creator Craig McCracken's popular Cartoon Network series, this tale of America's cutest superheroes is chock-full of flashing, bullet-fast action sequences as three little girls cause trouble, wreak havoc, and, of course, save the day. As a whole, the film is not as quickly paced as its parts, but the adventure is great fun nonetheless.

And that can be chalked up to the single element that differentiates the heavy-duty action in The Powerpuff Girls from, say, a Pokémon feature: humor. Just like the entertaining television series, the Powerpuff movie has laughs to spare, some aimed at the grade school set and many targeted at their parents.

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Rugrats Go Wild! Review


Terrible
You would have figured that with a show and movie series as delightfully cynical as Rugrats would have had the foresight to see that naming a movie with "Go Wild" in the title is just asking for insult. The similarities between the "Wild" movies go beyond the titles. Both take place in exotic getaway spots (a deserted island / a deserted alley outside a cheap New Orleans bar in Mardi Gras). Both involve a large cast of characters whose names you don't remember and whose voice you can barely make out through the sucking, slurping, or slurring of something or another. Oh yeah, and both are an utter waste of time unless your mind can't discern between binki-ness and kinkiness.

As if your kid will care, Rugrats Go Wild! is a cross between the shows Rugrats and The Wild Thornberrys, in which a Rugrats family vacation leads to being stranded on a deserted island. The only other inhabitants are the Thornberrys, a dysfunctional set of explorers with a souped-up RV that makes the new Lexus SUVs look like bumper cars. The adults get the idea to start going Lord of the Flies. The babies get the idea to start going exploring, and I get the idea to leave the theatre before dealing with an extra hour and a half of wasted time.

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The Rugrats Movie Review


Excellent
So I'm a little late in writing this review. I really don't care. Neither do Tommy or Dill or Angelica or Chucky, who have pretty much been chased out of their playpen box-office by the funny but unintelligent A Bug's Life. But this movie suceeds where both A Bug's Life and it's competitor Antz failed: in creating a kids-love/adults-love movie. Kids love A Bug's Life, Adults love Antz. Both of them love Rugrats.

The most intelligent cartoon since The Simpsons (which the same animation team behind Rugrats worked on) has come to the big screen. It's a look at the babies of the new all-American parents: both at work, both armed with cell phones and faxes. They're raised by their sleeping grandfather and are intelligent beyond their single year.

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Rugrats In Paris: The Movie Review


Good
Well, the Rugrats are back, and, as usual, they're way too sophisticated for their audience. The Simpsons of the Nickelodeon Network has meandered its way back onto the big screen, and this time they are hitting the streets of Paris with more Freudian slips than a sexually-charged first date.

To start with, Grandpa Lou has gotten remarried (leading into, by the way, an excellent parody of The Godfather in the first scene) and all Chuckie wants is a mommy. Meanwhile, Stu Pickles gets a call from Paris demanding that he come to fix a giant mechanical Reptar (a wonderful running Godzilla/Pokemon spoof gag from the series) which he designed.

Continue reading: Rugrats In Paris: The Movie Review

Babe: Pig In The City Review


Unbearable
The problem with sequels is that they try too much to be like the original. Sure, there are a few exceptions. I can't think of any right off the top of my head, but rule #665 in The Critic's Bible: there are exceptions to every rule. Babe, by all accounts, was an intelligent, thought out movie. Babe II: Pig in the City, tries and tries but can't quiet do it.

Sure, the humor is moderately intelligent and the narration includes things like a mention of the chaos theory, but when it boils down to it, Babe II was just like every other sequel: an attempt to carbon copy the original. But, friends, the great copy machine known as Hollywood is broken, and has never gotten a repairman, so we are doomed to watch screwed up attempts at copying, remakes gone wrong, and things screwed up.

Continue reading: Babe: Pig In The City Review

Valley Girl Review


Good
Dated yet infectious, Valley Girl is the kind of absurd romantic/teen/sex comedy that they just don't make any more. Nicolas Cage takes his first starring role as "the punk" from Hollywood, to whom titular "gag me with a spoon" valley girl Deborah Foreman finds herself drawn. There's a local jock also in the picture, and of course Foreman's got a totally tubular group of friends (including future voice of Babe Elizabeth Daily and Real Genius co-star Michelle Meyrink). The story is typical kids' stuff, but the '80s setting and ear-thrashing lingo is unforgettable.
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