Dylan Walsh

Dylan Walsh

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Dylan Walsh and Leslie Bourque - Photographs of a variety of stars as they arrived at the New York Premiere of 'Exodus: Gods And Kings' which was held at the Brooklyn Museum in New York City, New York, United States - Sunday 7th December 2014

Dylan Walsh and Leslie Bourque
Dylan Walsh

Dylan Walsh, Leslie Bourque and kids - Disney On Ice presents 'Frozen' at The Barclay's Center in Brooklyn - Arrivals at Barclays Center, Disney - Brooklyn, New York, United States - Tuesday 11th November 2014

Dylan Walsh, Leslie Bourque and Kids
Dylan Walsh and Family
Dylan Walsh and Family
Dylan Walsh and Family
Dylan Walsh
Dylan Walsh

Dylan Walsh - Dylan Walsh at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 10th September 2014

Dylan Walsh
Dylan Walsh
Dylan Walsh

Dylan Walsh, Leslie Bourque and and Kids - Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey presents Legends VIP night at Barclays Center - New York City, New York, United States - Thursday 20th February 2014

Dylan Walsh, Leslie Bourque and And Kids
Dylan Walsh
Dylan Walsh

Video - Dylan Walsh And Poppy Montgomery Film A Scene For Season 2 Of 'Unforgettable'


'Nip/Tuck' actor Dylan Walsh and 'Without a Trace' star Poppy Montgomery are spotted filming a scene on the set of crime drama series 'Unforgettable' in New York.

Continue: Video - Dylan Walsh And Poppy Montgomery Film A Scene For Season 2 Of 'Unforgettable'

Dylan Walsh Los Angeles, California, United States Dylan Walsh out christmas shopping at The Grove Thursday 20th December 2012

Dylan Walsh
Dylan Walsh
Dylan Walsh

Video - DylDylan Walsh Chats About "Nip Tuck" After Leaving Cafe Primo


Dylan Walsh chats about "Nip Tuck" after leaving Cafe Primo

Secretariat Trailer


Penny Chenery never really thought she would take over the family racing stables but as her fathers health started to deteriorate, Penny found herself in just that position. In recent years the team at Meadow Stables found themselves on somewhat of a loosing streak but all that was about to change when a bit of luck started to come their way.

Starting to operate in a male dominated business, Penny and her small team including her loyal and well known trainer Lucien Laurin began to make waves on the racing circuit mainly because their determination and a beautiful chestnut colt named Secretariat which Penny found herself owner of purely by chance.

Continue: Secretariat Trailer

The Stepfather Trailer


Watch the trailer for The Stepfather.

Continue: The Stepfather Trailer

Edmond Review


Weak
There's a slight chance, very slight, that David Mamet is a genius. As a writer, his blunt, edgy, and constantly interrupted dialogue has earned him a lot of weight, so much so that he is considered one of the more important playwrights of the last 25 years or so. As a director, he is precise and extremely-well calculated, if not a bit lacking in aesthetic substance and style. When he directs his own work, it tends to go remarkably smooth, as it did in the fantastic Heist and his best film, State and Main. However, when put in the hands of others, sometimes it goes exceedingly well (James Foster's Glengarry Glen Ross) or exceedingly bad (Michael Corrente's American Buffalo). The latest is a retelling of his play Edmond by King of the Ants helmer Stuart Gordon.On his way home from work, Edmond Burke (William H. Macy) decides to stop at a fortune teller. She simply tells him this: "You are not where you're supposed to be." This causes him to leave his wife (a brief Rebecca Pidgeon) and to go out on the town to get an old fashioned piece of tail, as suggested by a stranger at a bar (the reputable Joe Mantegna). He goes through strippers, booth girls and expensive call girls, played by a who's who of young actresses ranging from Mena Suvari to Denise Richards. He finally settles on a waitress (Julia Stiles) who he picks up after attacking a pimp and finding a newfound love for life. This passion, however, leads to a terrible act that lands him in jail and doing things that he was scared of before, constantly saying "every fear hides a wish."Mamet's sly style of writing somehow seems lacking here. In Glengarry, he wrote with blood and thunder about the rigorous work of real estate salesmen and in Oleanna, he split the sexual harassment debate so thinly that you couldn't see his opinion without microscope eyes. With Edmond however, he lays everything out for the audience and world to see, allowing the character to often pontificate on basic musings like what it's like to feel alive and the mundane nature of normal life. There is a serious lack of subtext that gives off the feeling of extreme annoyance.Gordon directs with a simple enough structuralism and he gives impressive terror to the climactic scene where Edmond goes over the edge. However, this simplicity also leads to a considerable loss in mood and atmosphere, which seems devoid after the excellent opening scene in the fortune teller's room. The actors, chiefly Macy and Stiles, struggle to keep the story afloat and exciting, but it's a losing battle. Reliable character actors like Bai Ling and Dylan Walsh (so good in Nip/Tuck) are given scant screen time to show their prowess, but Bokeem Woodbine works wonders as Edmond's bunkmate when he enters prison. None of this, however, allows Edmond to make more than a small ripple in the water. It's a fussy little movie that wants to be much more controversial and important than it is. Did I say those chances were very, very slight?The dead hooker's under the card in the middle.

The Lake House Review


OK

Director Alejandro Agresti's The Lake House, based on a South Korean film called Il Mare, takes the premise that launched movies such as Back to the Future and Frequency and asks, "What would a good boyfriend do with these powers?" The powers in this case involve a mystical mailbox that connects two would-be lovers who are living two years apart. Unfortunately, the answer to that question ends up being "Nothing interesting enough to last for almost two hours."

Alex Wyler (Keanu Reeves) is an architect living in Chicago who has recently bought the lake house built by his cold, uncaring father (Christopher Plummer). Kate Forster (Sandra Bullock) is a doctor living in Chicago who has recently moved out of the same house. She leaves a note in the mailbox for the next tenant, which is received by Alex who, puzzled by the note's references to objects that aren't there (yet), writes back. Eventually the two figure out that they are, in fact, living in different years - Alex in 2004, and Kate in 2006. She doesn't bother to tell him how the election turned out.

Being lonely workaholic types and apparently lacking a broadband connection, they decide to continue the correspondence. Rather than ask for stock tips or sports scores, Alex opts instead to do little favors for Kate, planting a tree that will later grow out in front of her apartment complex, or leaving graffiti for her on a wall that no one bothers to clean or write over for two years. As they grow closer, Alex discovers why he can't be with Kate in his present, while Kate struggles with trying to meet him in hers.

The Lake House is the type of film that could make a fantastic half hour episode of The Twilight Zone, but needs to bring a lot more to the table if it wants to stretch to feature length. For starters, the dialogue does not sound like it came from the pen of a Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, but that's David Auburn's name right there in the opening credits. Reeves and Bullock are serviceable in their roles, with Reeves playing 10 percent less wooden than usual and Bullock conveying forlorn with aplomb, but none of this is terribly new or interesting. If anything, Alex's B-plot relationship with his father, which prompts a speech Auburn must have copied and pasted from a better script he had lying around, merits more screen time than the A-plot it barely services.

Agresti's direction at times results in some interesting visuals, including clever attempts to show the pair occupying the same space at different times in one shot. Meanwhile, attempts to have the characters verbalize their written correspondence just make them seem like they're talking to themselves. And while the story has some fun with the notion of a postal bridge across time, the poorly concealed plot points make it seem like there's some mystical mailbox at the end of the film sending us everything that's going to happen before we're halfway into the movie.

In the end, The Lake House is not a particularly bad film, but it's not a particularly good one, either. It smacks mostly of wasted potential, and the sense that the phrase "close enough" informed too many choices. If I were sending letters back in time to someone advising them on which films to skip, I'd probably forget to even mention this.

Pass the salt, Sady.

Chapter Zero Review


OK
Adam Lazarus's life is so sad -- gasp! -- that his first novel was rejected by one publisher! Can you believe it!? He's so despondent he throws the manuscript away along with his computer.

Putting aside the absurdity of the scenario that a writer would abandon his craft based on a single rejection for his first major work, Chapter Zero ultimately reveals itself as a pleasant enough -- though ultimately trivial -- little comedy.

Continue reading: Chapter Zero Review

Men Review


Weak
Sean Young is a complete slut. If you like this idea for a movie, you're going to love Men. Loses its charm about 2/3 of the way in. If Young on her back can be considered "charm."

Nobody's Fool Review


Very Good
Paul Newman is back as the title character of Nobody's Fool. Nobody's Fool is a study of small-town life in upstate New York, focused on Newman as the go-between among a dozen or so townsfolk. Superb performances abound, particularly by Jessica Tandy (in her final role) and Bruce Willis, and even Melanie Griffith as Newman's would-be love interest performs with genuine emotion. Newman steals the show, of course, as the flawed Everyman who chooses to just let life happen and not make a big show of it.

Continue reading: Nobody's Fool Review

Dylan Walsh

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Dylan Walsh Movies

Secretariat Trailer

Secretariat Trailer

Penny Chenery never really thought she would take over the family racing stables but as...

The Stepfather Trailer

The Stepfather Trailer

Watch the trailer for The Stepfather. After spending a year at military school, Michael returns...

Edmond Movie Review

Edmond Movie Review

There's a slight chance, very slight, that David Mamet is a genius. As a writer,...

The Lake House Movie Review

The Lake House Movie Review

Director Alejandro Agresti's The Lake House, based on a South Korean film called Il Mare,...

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