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Calvary Review


Excellent

After the 2011 black comedy The Guard, Brendan Gleeson reteams with writer-director John Michael McDonagh for a darker comical drama grappling with issues of faith and forgiveness. McDonagh's usual jagged dialogue and snappy characters are on-hand in abundance while the film digs deep through a rather meandering, episodic plot.

In rural Ireland, Father James (Brendan Gleeson) is quietly enduring confessionals when one of his parishioners says he's going to kill him next Sunday. Shaken, James begins to explore his faith and mortality over the coming week. His daughter Fiona (Kelly Reilly) arrives following another suicide attempt, and he consoles a grieving French visitor (Marie-Josee Croze) and visits an imprisoned killer (Domhnall Gleeson). But almost anyone in the village could be the aspiring murderer: the over-emotional butcher (Chris O'Dowd), drug-addict doctor (Aidan Gillen), ladies-man African (Isaach De Bankole), shifty millionaire (Dylan Moran), eccentric fisherman (M. Emmet Walsh).

Intriguingly, it never really matters who issued the threat (James has a pretty good idea), because that's not the point of the film. McDonagh is exploring bigger ideas here, adeptly mixing riotously funny dialogue with startlingly bleak emotions. The film's languid pace nearly lulls us to sleep, then wakes us up with another sparky scene-stealing performance from the gifted cast. Gleeson is wonderfully muted, expressing more with an exhausted sigh than most actors can manage with a Shakespearean monologue. His moments with Reilly crackle with honest emotion, and the deceptively simple scene between father and son actors Brendan and Domhnall is a heart-stopper.

Continue reading: Calvary Review

Dylan Moran - Guests arrive at the Jameson Dublin International Film Festival opening Gala premiere of 'Calvary' at The Savoy, Dublin - Dublin, Ireland - Thursday 13th February 2014

Dylan Moran

Dylan Moran - Guests arrive at the Jameson Dublin International Film Festival opening Gala premiere of 'Calvary' at The Savoy... - Dublin, Ireland - Thursday 13th February 2014

Dylan Moran
Dylan Moran
Dylan Moran
Dylan Moran

New Dark Comedy 'Calvary' Features A Stellar Irish Cast [Trailer + Pictures]


Brendan Gleeson Chris O'Dowd Dylan Moran Kelly Reilly John Michael McDonagh

The trailer for dark Irish drama Calvary (with black comedy twists) has hit the net, giving us a better look at John Michael McDonagh’s follow up to The Guard. Featuring an immensely talented cast, weaved into a compelling, dangerous plot, it’s got us excited for sure.

Brendan Gleeson and Kelly ReillyBrendan Gleeson, Kelly Reilly and dog in Calvary

The story follows good natured and widely-liked priest James Lavelle (Brendan Gleeson) who receives an odd confession, in which a man says he will kill him, a week on Sunday, once he has his house in order. The rules of the 'Seal of the Confessional' mean he can’t go to the police with his newfound information, and must embark on a quest to discover who has murderous intentions for him – if anyone at all.

Continue reading: New Dark Comedy 'Calvary' Features A Stellar Irish Cast [Trailer + Pictures]

Calvary Trailer


Father James Lavelle is a good-natured priest whose life is thrown into confusion and disarray when an anonymous man tells him in confession that he will kill him in a week's time - the only reason being because Lavelle is an innocent man. Of all the shocking things he's ever heard in confession, none have thrown him quite as much as this. Unable to go to the police under the rules of the 'Seal of the Confessional', Lavelle consults his church peers pondering whether it was merely an idle threat, or whether his life really is in danger. In his apparent last week in existence, he scrutinises the corrupt individuals of his sin-filled parish, wondering along the way why people seem to focus more on their vices than their virtues, but when his beloved church is burnt to the ground, his views on good and evil become distorted.

'Calvary' is the darkly comic drama about the timeless story of good and evil, and guilt and innocence. It has been directed and written by BAFTA nominated John Michael McDonagh ('The Guard', 'Ned Kelly') and is set in Ireland's beautiful West Coast countryside. The film is set to be released on April 11th 2014.

Click here to read - Calvary Movie Review

Dylan Moran - RockNess Festival in Inverness - Performances- Day 2 - Inverness, Scotland - Saturday 8th June 2013

Dylan Moran
Dylan Moran
Dylan Moran
Dylan Moran
Dylan Moran
Dylan Moran

Good Vibrations Review


Good

The story of Belfast's "godfather of punk" is told with plenty of groovy style to match the 1970s setting, mixing the music with colourful locations and lively characters. But while the story is fascinating, the film itself is too cluttered and fragmented to resonate with anyone who isn't already familiar with the events.

As politics and religion rage against each other in late-1960s Northern Ireland, local DJ Terry Hooley (Dormer) rejects both sides to concentrate on the music he loves. His wife Ruth (Whittaker) loves it as well, but starts to worry when Terry catches the fire of the punk movement, which stands up boldly to society. Soon Terry is helping promote local bands through his Good Vibrations record shop, discovering the likes of Rudi, the Outcasts and, most notably, the Undertones and their mega-hit Teenage Kicks. Terry knows what he has with them, but is doing this out of passion for the music. Which means he never keeps enough cash for himself to pay his bills.

Filmmakers D'Sa and Leyburn follow Hooley closely through his rollercoaster life, from moments of high excess to more harrowing scenes as his business and marriage fall apart around him. The narrative bounces quickly through the decades, keeping the tone light while remembering the seriousness of the violent clashes in the streets and the darker emotional issues that keep coming to the surface. But Hooley is a happy-go-lucky guy, only barely aware that he is squandering his resources. And Dormer delivers a remarkably vivid performance as a funny and hugely likeable guy who prefers to help others instead of himself.

Continue reading: Good Vibrations Review

Latitude Festival 2013 Announce Initial Line-Up

Posted on 19 March 2013

Latitude Festival 2013 Announce Initial Line-up

Good Vibrations Trailer


When Terri Hooley decided to open up the record shop Good Vibrations in Belfast in the 70s world of hippies and strong political messages, he had no idea that he would soon discover what would be some of the most prominent groups on the newly emerging punk scene. After managing to secure local band Rudi their first record, he was soon approached by another band: The Undertones. Although initially reluctant to sign them at first, after hearing them play he was astounded at what came through his headphones in the studio with their debut single 'Teenage Kicks'. Unfortunately, he struggled to get even a slight sign of interest from any record company in London in the beginning but the airplay soon picked up and it became one of the most recognisable punk songs in the UK. This is how Terri Hooley became one of these most significant figures in the late 70s punk progression.

Continue: Good Vibrations Trailer

Run Fatboy Run Review


Bad
Simon Pegg and Asia Argento are birds of a feather: They both have a preternatural ability to enliven even the limpest of cinematic propositions. Whereas Argento has a longer track record (xXx, Land of the Dead, and the recent Boarding Gate), Pegg doesn't have the American market completely (forgive me) pegged, nor does he have the pedigree. But the man has a way of balancing sarcasm and general incompetency that gives a goofy zing to some mighty soggy material (The Good Night, Mission: Impossible III).

With Run Fatboy Run, the directorial debut of Friends' David Schwimmer, Pegg moves up in the world and proves that he can, indeed, carry a movie. Written by Michael Ian Black, a seminal member of the comedy troupe/television show The State, Fatboy tells the story of Dennis (Pegg), a 1980s reject who gets the daft idea to leave his pregnant wife Libby (Thandie Newton) at the altar. A few years later, he has a gut, works security for a lingerie shop, and must vie for the attention of his son and once-fiancé against Whit (Hank Azaria), a healthy businessman who wants to marry Libby. This passive-aggressive tête-à-tête finally leads Dennis to attempting to compete in the same marathon as Whit.

Continue reading: Run Fatboy Run Review

Dylan Moran - Monday 3rd September 2007 at Odeon West End London, England

Dylan Moran
Dylan Moran

Tristram Shandy: A Cock And Bull Story Review


Very Good
At one point during Michael Winterbottom's shambolically hilarious Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story, a film about trying to film the legendarily unfilmmable 18th century novel, Steve Coogan says to a reporter that the wonderful thing about Laurence Sterne's book (which he obviously hasn't read) is how ahead of its time it was, that it was "a postmodern novel... before there was a modernism... to be post of." It's a throwaway line in some respects, but it's an excellent example of the layered absurdist humor that abounds within its wonderfully loose format. This is a film about ego, the fatal inability of people to plan their lives, and the delirious chaos of the creative process. It's also about what utter jerks movie stars can be, God bless 'em.

Sterne's novel is a big old mess and has never been quite accepted in the literary canon. Published in nine installments over a decade, it's a subplot-mad, diversion-crazed bildungsroman where the narrator - Shandy - can't even get past describing his own birth by the end of the book, due to his tendency to go off on tangents. Along the way it packs in satires of contemporary intellectuals like Pope and Locke and plays with the novelistic form, including even having one page printed entirely black to represent sorrow at a character's death. They try that in the film, but then realize it's not quite so interesting for audience.

Continue reading: Tristram Shandy: A Cock And Bull Story Review

Tristram Shandy: A Cock And Bull Story Review


Very Good
At one point during Michael Winterbottom's shambolically hilarious Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story, a film about trying to film the legendarily unfilmmable 18th century novel, Steve Coogan says to a reporter that the wonderful thing about Laurence Sterne's book (which he obviously hasn't read) is how ahead of its time it was, that it was "a postmodern novel... before there was a modernism... to be post of." It's a throwaway line in some respects, but it's an excellent example of the layered absurdist humor that abounds within its wonderfully loose format. This is a film about ego, the fatal inability of people to plan their lives, and the delirious chaos of the creative process. It's also about what utter jerks movie stars can be, God bless 'em.

Sterne's novel is a big old mess and has never been quite accepted in the literary canon. Published in nine installments over a decade, it's a subplot-mad, diversion-crazed bildungsroman where the narrator - Shandy - can't even get past describing his own birth by the end of the book, due to his tendency to go off on tangents. Along the way it packs in satires of contemporary intellectuals like Pope and Locke and plays with the novelistic form, including even having one page printed entirely black to represent sorrow at a character's death. They try that in the film, but then realize it's not quite so interesting for audience.

Continue reading: Tristram Shandy: A Cock And Bull Story Review

Shaun Of The Dead Review


Good
Shaun (Simon Pegg) is going nowhere in life. He's a 29-year-old sales manager at a London electronics store populated by teenage employees who don't respect him. His girlfriend Liz (Kate Ashfield), tired of her beau's adolescent slackerdom and penchant for wining and dining her at the unromantic Winchester Tavern, has unceremoniously dumped him. And his best friend and roommate Ed (Nick Frost) is a lazy slob who plays videogames all day long, doesn't pay rent, regularly impersonates the orangutan from Every Which Way But Loose, and offers beneficial break-up advice like, "You know what we should do tomorrow? Keep drinking." Shaun, unmotivated and irresponsible, spends his dead-end days like a zombie. That is, until real zombies start showing up in his back yard.

In Edgar Wright's Shaun of the Dead, zombie-smashing antics serve as backdrop for the maturation of couch potato Shaun, who learns to embrace accountability and responsibility during his journey to save Liz and his dear ol' mum (Penelope Wilton) from the hordes of walking corpses infesting metropolitan London. With a cricket bat in hand and wise-cracking Ed at his side, Shaun embarks on his daring rescue mission with annoyed nonchalance, and his general disgust at having to do something, anything, besides sitting slack-jawed in front of the television is the comedic lifeblood of Wright's tongue-in-cheek parody of zombie movie conventions and big-budget Hollywood moviemaking. Shooting for gut-busting humor instead of stomach-churning terror, the film is awash in absurdity. Shaun's general catatonic demeanor causes him to miss the initial warning signs of London's apocalyptic state of affairs, and, once he finally does grasp the situation's severity, his reluctant heroism is tinged with irritability at being inconvenienced. When it comes time to destroy the monsters, Shaun does so with a blasé attitude that makes his gallantry less a stirring act of self-realization than a fart-infused, brain-squashing goof-off.

Continue reading: Shaun Of The Dead Review

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4K Restoration Of The Beatles' Shea Stadium Gig To Be Released In Cinemas

4K Restoration Of The Beatles' Shea Stadium Gig To Be Released In Cinemas

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Dylan Moran Movies

Calvary Movie Review

Calvary Movie Review

After the 2011 black comedy The Guard, Brendan Gleeson reteams with writer-director John Michael McDonagh...

Calvary Trailer

Calvary Trailer

Father James Lavelle is a good-natured priest whose life is thrown into confusion and disarray...

Good Vibrations Movie Review

Good Vibrations Movie Review

The story of Belfast's "godfather of punk" is told with plenty of groovy style to...

Good Vibrations Trailer

Good Vibrations Trailer

When Terri Hooley decided to open up the record shop Good Vibrations in Belfast in...

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Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story Movie Review

Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story Movie Review

At one point during Michael Winterbottom's shambolically hilarious Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story,...

Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story Movie Review

Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story Movie Review

At one point during Michael Winterbottom's shambolically hilarious Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story,...

Shaun of the Dead Movie Review

Shaun of the Dead Movie Review

Shaun (Simon Pegg) is going nowhere in life. He's a 29-year-old sales manager at a...

Shaun Of The Dead Movie Review

Shaun Of The Dead Movie Review

A huge hit in England last spring and a shoe-in for instant cult-classic status, "Shaun...

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