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Dule Hill and Allison Janney - World premiere of 'Michael Jackson One' at Mandalay Bay Hotel & Casino - Arrivals - Las Vegas, Nevada, United States - Saturday 29th June 2013

Dule Hill and Allison Janney
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Dule Hill and Allison Janney
Dule Hill and Alfre Woodard
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Dule Hill and Allison Janney

Dule Hill Wednesday 1st December 2010 The 10th Annual Heroes in the Struggle Gala concert and awards presented by the Black AIDS Institute Los Angeles, California

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Dule Hill and Bonnie Hammer - Dule Hill, Bonnie Hammer and guest New York City, USA - The 2nd annual Character Approved Awards cocktail reception at The IAC Building Thursday 25th February 2010

Dule Hill and Bonnie Hammer

Dule Hill Thursday 19th March 2009 3rd Annual Avant Garde Fashion Event and 'Shark City' afterparty at Boulevard 3 - Inside Los Angeles, California

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Hill Harper and Dule Hill - Hill Harper and Dule Hill Los Angeles, California - The 39th NAACP Image Awards held at the Shrine Auditorium - Arrivals Thursday 14th February 2008

Hill Harper and Dule Hill

The West Wing: Season Six Review


Good
The death of veteran actor John Spencer -- who played Chief of Staff Leo McGarry, the coolest head among the cast of The West Wing -- was sad news, and it was the final death knell for the once-popular NBC series, now finishing its seventh and final season. That's a shame, because in some ways the show is still getting better.

When creator Aaron Sorkin left The West Wing abruptly in 2003, many people wrote the show off. Sorkin imbued the show with his naïve left-liberal bias and scripted much of its glib dialogue, and his leaving seemed to guarantee an identity crisis. In fact, The West Wing was really nothing more than Sorkin's personal wish fulfillment: What if we elected a strongly moral liberal Democrat as president? Or to put it a different way, what if President Clinton (who was still president when the show started, in 1999) had been even more liberal, and not horny all the time? Sorkin's answer was Jed Bartlet, the imaginary president played by Martin Sheen. Bartlet is sort of a Ted Kennedy with gravitas -- a sententious, northeastern liberal Catholic who, because this is TV, is always right. (With John Kerry we actually had a chance to elect someone like Bartlet, minus the intellectual rigor, and not too surprisingly, the electorate didn't go nuts over him. Of course, Kerry was not as telegenic as Martin Sheen.)

Continue reading: The West Wing: Season Six Review

The West Wing: Sixth Season Review


Good
The death of veteran actor John Spencer -- who played Chief of Staff Leo McGarry, the coolest head among the cast of The West Wing -- was sad news, and it was the final death knell for the once-popular NBC series, now finishing its seventh and final season. That's a shame, because in some ways the show is still getting better.

When creator Aaron Sorkin left The West Wing abruptly in 2003, many people wrote the show off. Sorkin imbued the show with his naïve left-liberal bias and scripted much of its glib dialogue, and his leaving seemed to guarantee an identity crisis. In fact, The West Wing was really nothing more than Sorkin's personal wish fulfillment: What if we elected a strongly moral liberal Democrat as president? Or to put it a different way, what if President Clinton (who was still president when the show started, in 1999) had been even more liberal, and not horny all the time? Sorkin's answer was Jed Bartlet, the imaginary president played by Martin Sheen. Bartlet is sort of a Ted Kennedy with gravitas -- a sententious, northeastern liberal Catholic who, because this is TV, is always right. (With John Kerry we actually had a chance to elect someone like Bartlet, minus the intellectual rigor, and not too surprisingly, the electorate didn't go nuts over him. Of course, Kerry was not as telegenic as Martin Sheen.)

Continue reading: The West Wing: Sixth Season Review

Sexual Life Review


Good
Deja vu. I've now seen this movie three times: Only the first two times it was called Chain of Desire and Love in the Time of Money. Fortunately, Sexual Life is the marginal best of these three remarkably similar films: Each of which uses the new cliche of "six degrees of (sexual) separation" to tell its story. We start with one couple: Then she goes off to another guy, then he hooks up with another girl, and so on and so on until the movie comes full circle, of course. See, we're all screwing each other! Deep? Hardly, but a number of engaging performances here, most notably Elizabeth Banks and a less-crazy Anne Heche, elevate this into reasonable watchability.
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