Dudley Moore

Dudley Moore

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10 Review


Weak
"Introducing Bo Derek?" She got introduced two years earlier in the infamous Orca.

No matter: She acquits herself far better here, namely ecause she has nearly no lines. This is Dudley Moore's show: An absurd and hopelessly dated bit of slapstick about Moore's showbiz star facing a midlife crisis. Zoom, he's off to Mexico, where he daydreams about Derek (in those hideous braids) at length. Blake Edwards made worse films than this, but his comic timing is all wrong, exiled to long bouts of non-sequitur gags, such as Moore's run-in with dentistry.

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Crazy People Review


Grim
Ah, the curse of an unorthodox sleep schedule. Yet again I find myself watching movies I barely remember being advertised at times of night (or, in this case, morning) that are highly strange. Griping about my combination of yuppie flu and insomnia (the latter both coming on at the worst time) aside, I found myself watching a movie this morning that I had not seen in years.

The movie, Crazy People, is one of those films for which the phrase "only in Hollywood" was coined. Its hook: a bunch of lunatics come up with honest ad campaigns (i.e. "Continental: We'll screw them to get your package there on time" and "Sony: Because Caucasians are just too damn tall"). Its stars slapped in: Dudley Morre (whom I affectionately nickname the British Warren Beatty), Daryl Hannah (at the end of the 80s, the decade she shared with Kim Basigner), Paul Reiser (before "Mad About You"), David Paymer (need I say more), and J.T. Walsh.

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Arthur Review


Good
It's the movie we'll forever know Dudley Moore for -- and the late John Gielgud, too, who is put out to pasture about halfway through this classic comedy. "Classic" doesn't necessarily mean "fabulous" in this case, however -- Arthur is little more than a glamorization of an otherwise no-account, good-for-nothing, stinking-rich drunk. Moore is hardly a role model, and his tale of "I love a poor girl" is so sappy one questions how Arthur ever became a hit. Two words: John Gielgud, who shines in what could have been the embarassment of his life. Party on, John.

Foul Play Review


Good
I've seen Foul Play more times than I'm willing to admit, but watching it again on DVD reveals just how brainless and silly the film really is. Not that that's a bad thing: With Goldie Hawn and Chevy Chase in the leads, what more would you expect? But the movie, at last, is showing its age after all these years.

Hawn plays a San Francisco librarian who unwittingly gets wrapped up in a massive conspiracy revolving around the Catholic church and a host of bad guys, including an albino and a dwarf (possibly teaming up these two iconic movie evildoers for the first time in cinema). Chase, after appearing in one early scene, vanishes for the first 45 minutes, returning to reveal himself as a bumbling cop who protects her for the remainder of the film. Together they crack the case, one of the most absurd stories ever put on film.

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Bedazzled (1967) Review


OK
I didn't see the original Bedazzled until after the remake, and while it's no masterwork, it's a far better picture. Dudley Moore is well-suited as the dolt who gives up his soul for seven wishes, all in a vain attempt to win the heart of a rather sour woman (Eleanor Bron), but it's Peter Cook (best known to Gen-X as the lisping priest from The Princess Bride) as the devil who is truly memorable. Cute and amusing, but extremely dated.

Micki & Maude Review


Unbearable
Have you ever been to a party and flirted and chatted with a perfectly lovely guy or girl only not to get a phone number? That's happened to me a time or two and I've spent days analyzing what went wrong. It wasn't that I didn't have the power to do something, but other forces were at hand in my inactivity.

I'm currently in the same mental hell over Micki & Maude, Blake Edwards' 1984 alleged comedy. The remote control was right beside me, the stop button sending out its siren call, begging me to push it. And I did nothing. For two hours I watched an awful movie with as much laughs as a funeral home Christmas party. And I did nothing.

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Dudley Moore

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