Drea De Matteo

Drea De Matteo

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Dark Places Trailer


Libby Day is a young woman, still permanently scarred from the events of her childhood. As a 7-year-old girl living in Kansas, she witnessed the brutal slaughter of her family, only weeks after discovering a bizarre interest of her brother Ben's and evidence that he practiced Satanism. After she accused Ben, then 16-years-old, of murder, he was locked up for life and her name went down in crime history. It left her with money from a charitable fund and royalities from her autobiography, but now in her early 30s she's completely broke. Soon though she meets Lyle Wirth, a member of a ghoulish group named The Kill Club, full of crime obsessed wannabe detectives who enjoy solving vicious crimes. They offer her money to help them solve what really happened when she was a girl, because hardly any of them believe her brother was the perpetrator of the massacre. She's sure it was him, but now she's forced to return to that time in her life and remember exactly what happened in the moments leading up to the tragedy - and that gets even more complicated when she finally visits Ben in prison.

Continue: Dark Places Trailer

Filming on location set of NBC's new TV series 'Shades of Blue'

Drea de Matteo - Filming on location set of NBC's new TV series 'Shades of Blue' at Brooklyn - New York City, United States - Monday 15th June 2015

Drea de Matteo
Drea de Matteo
Drea de Matteo
Drea de Matteo
Drea de Matteo

Jennifer Lopez on the set of Shades of Blue

Ray Liotta, Jennifer Lopez and Drea de Matteo - Jennifer Lopez on the set of Shades of Blue - Manhattan, New York, United States - Friday 12th June 2015

Ray Liotta, Jennifer Lopez and Drea de Matteo
Ray Liotta, Jennifer Lopez and Drea de Matteo
Ray Liotta, Jennifer Lopez and Drea de Matteo
Ray Liotta, Jennifer Lopez and Drea de Matteo
Ray Liotta, Jennifer Lopez and Drea de Matteo

Wizard World Comic Con Fan Fest Chicago - Day 1

Drea de Matteo - Wizard World Comic Con Fan Fest Chicago held at the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center - Day 1 at Donald E. Stephens Convention Center - Rosemont, Illinois, United States - Saturday 7th March 2015

Drea de Matteo and Taryn Manning

Drea de Matteo takes her family shopping at The Grove

Drea de Matteo, Alabama Gypsyrose Jennings and Shooter Jennings - Desperate Housewives, Drea de Matteo takes her family shopping at The Grove in Hollywood - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 21st December 2014

Drea de Matteo, Alabama Gypsyrose Jennings and Shooter Jennings
Drea de Matteo, Alabama Gypsyrose Jennings and Shooter Jennings
Drea de Matteo, Alabama Gypsyrose Jennings and Shooter Jennings
Drea de Matteo, Alabama Gypsyrose Jennings and Shooter Jennings
Drea de Matteo

Final season premiere of 'Sons Of Anarchy' - Arrivals

Drea de Matteo - The stars of the hit FX series ‘Sons of Anarchy’ were photographed on the Red Carpet at the TCL Chinese Theatre, in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, ahead of the premiere for the seventh and final series of the show. - Saturday 6th September 2014

James Gandolfini's Funeral - Who Was In Attendance?


James Gandolfini Steve Buscemi Alec Baldwin Patricia Arquette Marcia Gay Harden Vince Gilligan Drea de Matteo

The funeral of Soprano's star James Gandolfini was held today (27th June 2013) at St John the Divine Catholic Church in New York. A private wake was held yesterday (Wednesday 26th June) in New Jersey for family members and close friends. 

Representing the cast and crew of The Sopranos was actress Aida Turturra and creator David Chase, who gave a eulogy. Gandolfini's widow Deborah Lin Gandolfini and two close family friends also spoke. 

James Gandolfini
The late James Gandolfini, pictured here attending the 8th Starlit Benefit Gala, New York, 10th June 2013

Continue reading: James Gandolfini's Funeral - Who Was In Attendance?

New York, I Love You Review


Good
There are 11 captivating short films in this anthology, the second in the Cities of Love series by producers Benbihy and Grasic. But this collection isn't quite as varied or engaging as Paris Je T'Aime.

All of these stories take place in Manhattan, with only one or two brief forays into other boroughs, and they all centre around relatively well-off people, mainly white or Asian. They're also quite serious and emotional, with only brief moments of humour dotted here and there, although some make us smile more than others. Each is about a male-female relationship--marriages, brief encounters, possibilities, life-long companionship. Most have a somewhat gimmicky twist, and a few are intriguingly oblique.

Continue reading: New York, I Love You Review

Lake City Review


Unbearable
Oh Sissy, where art thou?

Cast as The Eternal Earth Mother in Hunter Hill and Perry Moore's Lake City, Sissy Spacek is a one woman universe -- tilling the soil, pushing wheelbarrows, filling the cupboards, sitting on the porch, and staring pensively at the sunset or gazing at the eternal landscape. She is not channeling her characters in Badlands or The River so much as going back to the source -- Linda Arvidson's stoic pioneer women from the old D.W. Griffith two-reelers (all that is missing is waiting for her effeminate husband to reel in the fish). She lives alone and leads a hard life keeping her farm together in rural Virginia and even though local gas station attendant and part-time guitar picker Roy (Keith Carradine) pines for her, Spacek's Maggie Pope keeps to herself and tend to her chores.

Continue reading: Lake City Review

Walker Payne Review


Grim
A fan of the film Walker Payne said she found it surprising, since everything about it seemed so different than what you'd expect from its director and co-writer Matt Williams, a TV scribbler who wrote for The Cosby Show and Roseanne before committing the crime of creating Home Improvement. On the surface of it, you'd think she was right, after all, the film is a hardscrabble period drama set in a small mining town, where the main character is forced into difficult circumstances in order to get his kids back from his harpy of a divorced wife. Although the subject matter might seem grimmer than Williams' standard TV fare - excepting perhaps Roseanne, which had its darker moments - it's unfortunately really just a shaggy dog story about a loveable loser who gets in over his head. At least there's an actual dog of not inconsiderable charisma.

The dog in question belongs to the titular Walker Payne (Jason Patric), who's the resident rogue of his little Illinois burg. Laid off from the coal mine at the film's opening, Walker kicks about for some other way of getting by, biding his time in the local watering hole, racking up more notches on his bedpost, and generally charming the pants off everyone - with the exception of the ex-wife (Drea de Matteo), who hates him with a near volcanic passion. Williams was smart enough to give such so much of the film over Patric, a generally underused performer who can slip into moroseness if not nudged out of his corner. The early stretches of the film are concerned with little else but Walker and his dog as they scrounge about town, and it's actually not half bad considering how little is going on. But then the plot starts to kick in, along with the problems.

Continue reading: Walker Payne Review

'R Xmas Review


Unbearable
I presume the inscrutible title is meant to be read as "Our Christmas," but don't expect any Home for the Holidays-style amusement in this abysmally pathetic drug drama from long-since-out-of-it director Abel Ferrara.

Though it's a wisp of a movie at 83 minutes, Ferrara manages to bore us to tears with the film's dippy story of drug deals gone wrong. The spare dialogue is a place to start: What little the film has is drowned out by annoying music and the rest consists mainly of unbroken strings of swear words, sometimes in English.

Continue reading: 'R Xmas Review

Prey for Rock & Roll Review


Terrible
In Gina Gershon's labor of love, the general worldview is worse than any other film short of A Clockwork Orange. This pathetic tale of a terrible all-girl (and 75% lesbian) band called, ahem, Clam Dandy, gives us Gershon as frontwoman and day-job tattoo artist, still trying to get her band to the Big Show some 20 years past its prime. But the story (what there is of it) is just a backdrop for some world-class bad tidings: Prey for Rock & Roll (oh, it's a pun!) tells us that getting raped, being addicted to drugs, getting beat up, and even getting run over and killed are all worth it -- if it makes your music even more angry (and thus, good). The only thing worse than the plot itself are the music (good lord) and Gershon's horrid melange of tattoos. Sad.

Assault On Precinct 13 (2005) Review


Grim
The trouble with big-budget remakes is that more often than not, the films being updated for modern audiences necessitate little improvement. Rather than resurrecting and reconfiguring interesting failures, studio executives and second-rate directors instead subscribe to a lame-brained formula in which highly regarded classics and quirky genre films made by esteemed filmmakers are stripped of their unique character and thematic underpinnings, given a coat of cinematographic flash, populated with pretty actors, and simplistically streamlined so that only the basic plot structure is retained. Respect for tradition be damned, these bastardized versions trample on their precursors' venerable legacies as they pitifully attempt to parlay their predecessor's name-brand cache into box-office glory.

Such is the sorry story of Assault on Precinct 13, a reimagining of John Carpenter's 1976 genre gem (which, in turn, was modeled after Howard Hawks' Rio Bravo) about cops and criminals trapped in an old police station who are forced to work together to fend off a horde of murderous invaders. Directed by Jean-François Richet, the new film holds to that fundamental premise, though it tweaks virtually every important aspect of Carpenter's thriller for maximum vapidity. Now set in snow-bound Detroit on New Year's Eve (rather than in arid California), Richet's Assault switches the skin color of its leads - the police sergeant (Ethan Hawke's Jake Roenick) is now white, while the head criminal (Laurence Fishburne's mythic Marion Bishop) is black - and abandons Carpenter's astute portrait of uneasy, ready-to-explode racial tensions. In this version, the cops are Caucasian (including Brian Dennehy's Irish racist, who tellingly refers to the inmates as "those people"), the bad guys are African-American and Hispanic, and any friction generated from such divisions is swept under the rug in favor of ratcheting up the ho-hum action.

Continue reading: Assault On Precinct 13 (2005) Review

Made Review


OK

"Swingers" lounge lizards Jon Favreau and Vince Vaughn are reunited in "Made" as a pair of feckless part-time boxers who try to make something of themselves by becoming inept bagmen for the mafia.

Another sardonic -- but more cinematically mature -- comedy written by Favreau (who also directed this time), the flick features Fav as Bobby, a hapless amateur of a pug who just wants to do right by his stripper girlfriend (Famke Janssen) and her angelic little daughter.

A downhearted but upright palooka, Bobby gets kicked off his "day" job as driver for his girlfriend's tease gigs when he punches out a grabby guest at a bachelor party. But his boss, a cranky back-room operator played with comedic panache by Peter Falk, gives him a chance to make up for it by going to New York to do a money drop for a high-rolling uptown gangster called Ruiz (hip-hop mogul Sean "Puffy" Combs).

Continue reading: Made Review

Assault On Precinct 13 Review


Weak

Adding a crooked-cops twist to the outnumbered-and-under-siege plot that John Carpenter lifted from "Rio Bravo" for his "original" 1976 B-movie shoot-'em-up, the new "Assault on Precinct 13" is a reasonably entertaining update of a reliable action-drama formula.

The flick gets off to a powerhouse start with a flashback to undercover cop Ethan Hawke posing as a freaked-out addict (and giving a great performance) during a drug bust gone wrong. Six months later he's pushing paper at the Detroit Police Department's most run-down outpost in an industrial outskirt of town during a New Year's Eve blizzard.

It's supposed to be the last day this precinct is open -- the phones have been shut down and the joint has been largely cleared of officers, weapons and equipment. But the road-closing storm brings Hawke and his two remaining stock-character staffers (retiring beat cop Brian Dennehy and sexy secretary Drea de Matteo) some unexpected visitors: A department shrink (Maria Bello), trapped there after her required session with reluctant patient Hawke (he's guilt-ridden over deaths in the drug bust), and a small busload of prisoners in transit.

Continue reading: Assault On Precinct 13 Review

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