Douglas Booth

Douglas Booth

Douglas Booth Quick Links

News Footage Pictures Video Film Quotes

Biography

Douglas Booth (09.07.1992) Douglas Booth is an English actor.

Childhood: Douglas Booth was born in London, England. His parents are Vivien, an artist, and his father works in shipping. He struggled with dyslexia at school and did not succeed academically.

Acting Career: Douglas Booth played Boy George in the BBC drama 'Worried About The Boy' in 2010 opposite Mathew Horne, Mark Gatiss and Marc Warren. In 2011, he was in 'Christopher and His Kind' with Matt Smith and a BBC One adaptation of Charles Dickens' 'Great Expectations'. He was cast as Romeo in 2013's 'Romeo and Juliet' written by Julian Fellowes. Hailee Steinfeld plays Juliet.

Other Career Ventures: Douglas Booth has modelled for the fashion brand Burberry.



Biography by Contactmusic.com

Picture - Douglas Booth - Private viewing... London United Kingdom, Thursday 2nd April 2015

Douglas Booth - Private viewing of 'The Top Ten' by artist Hayden Kays at The Cob Gallery - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 2nd April 2015

Douglas Booth
Douglas Booth

Picture - Douglas Booth - A variety... London United Kingdom, Wednesday 25th March 2015

Douglas Booth - A variety of stars were snapped as they arrived at the BBC Films 25th Anniversary Reception which was held at BBC Broadcasting House in London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 25th March 2015

Douglas Booth
Douglas Booth
Douglas Booth
Douglas Booth

Picture - Douglas Booth - A variety... London United Kingdom, Wednesday 25th March 2015

Douglas Booth - A variety of stars were snapped as they arrived at the BBC Films 25th Anniversary Reception which was held at BBC Broadcasting House in London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 25th March 2015

Picture - Douglas Booth - The EE... London United Kingdom, Sunday 8th February 2015

Douglas Booth - The EE British Academy Film Awards (BAFTA) 2015 Official After Party held at the Grosvenor House hotel - Arrivals at Grosvenor House - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 8th February 2015

Douglas Booth

Picture - Douglas Booth - Various stars... London United Kingdom, Sunday 8th February 2015

Douglas Booth - Various stars of film and television were photographed on the red carpet as they arrived for the the EE British Academy of Film and Television Awards which were held at The Opera House in London, United Kingdom - Sunday 8th February 2015

Jupiter Ascending Review


Filmmaking siblings Lana and Andy Wachowski never do anything by halves. The Matrix was a genre-changing blockbuster followed by two head-scratching sequels that ramped everything up a bit too much. Speed Racer was simply too much eye-candy for most viewers. And Cloud Atlas' intertwined storylines left audiences both exhausted and exhilarated. Now they've taken on the space action adventure with unfettered gusto, creating an utterly bonkers story that can't help but keep us thoroughly entertained.

So it turns out that Jupiter (Mila Kunis), an immigrant cleaner in Chicago, is actually the recurrence of a powerful matriarch whose empire runs the universe as a big business. Her three children (Eddie Redmayne, Douglas Booth and Tuppence Middleton) are tussling over control, because their mother's re-appearance changes their inheritance rights. Chased by bounty hunters, Jupiter is rescued by Caine (Channing Tatum) and his cohort Stinger (Sean Bean), who help her navigate the complex galactic society to claim her genetic rights. But each of the three children has plans for her. And as she zips back and forth across the universe, Jupiter realises that she's going to need to rise to the occasion if she wants to save herself. And Earth.

The Wachowskis clearly understand that the story is far too complicated to make much sense, so they only provide enough information to hold the audience's interest. Large plot threads and characters pop up and disappear at random, while Jupiter's own journey lurches through a series of contrived set-pieces and tense encounters that feel oddly unresolved. But none of that really matters, because the film is infused with a sardonic sense of humour that makes it enjoyable. Even the bad guys are intriguing; there's not much Redmayne can do with his leather-trousered grump, but at least he goes for it. Kunis has a great time with Jupiter's continual sexy costume changes, while Tatum performs a series of action scenes with his shirt off for no real reason. All of the cast members dive in without hesitation, using sheer charisma to make the characters a lot of fun to watch.

Continue reading: Jupiter Ascending Review

The Riot Club Review


Solid acting and adept filmmaking help make up for the fact that this film asks us to spend a couple of hours in the presence of a group of truly despicable characters. They're played by some of the brightest (and most beautiful) rising stars in the movies at the moment, but each one of these young men is vile to the core. So the fact that these are supposed to be Britain's brightest and best hope for the future makes the film pretty terrifying.

It's set at Oxford University, where the elite Riot Club (including Douglas Booth, Sam Reid, Freddie Fox, Matthew Beard, Ben Schnetzer and Olly Alexander) are on the lookout for wealthy white students to complete their 10-man membership. They find suitable candidates in new arrivals: the sneering Alistair (Sam Claflin) and conflicted Miles (Max Irons), whose one drawback is that he's seeing a common girl (Holliday Grainger). After the rigorous initiation process, Alistair and Miles are welcomed to the hedonistic gang at a lavish dinner in the private room of a country pub. But things turn nasty as they drunkenly hurl abuse at the pub manager (Gordon Brown), his daughter (Jessica Brown Findlay) and a high-class hooker (Natalie Dormer) they hire for the night.

Based on the play Posh by screenwriter Laura Wade, the film is centred around this increasingly chaotic dinner party. Although nothing that happens is particularly surprising, because these young men are such relentlessly bigoted, misogynist snobs that it's impossible to believe they belong anywhere other than prison. They certainly don't deserve their self-appointed status as the top students at Oxford, who are getting debauchery out of their systems before taking the lead in British politics and business. But then, that's precisely Wade's point, and she makes it loudly. Thankfully, director Lone Scherfig balances things by offering glimpses into these young men's dark souls while skilfully capturing the old-world subculture and a strong sense of irony.

Continue reading: The Riot Club Review

Comments