Don Roos

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Dan Bucatinsky and Don Roos - A host of stars were photographed as they attended the Family Equality Council's Los Angeles Awards Dinner which was held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 1st March 2015

Dan Bucatinsky and Don Roos
Dan Bucatinsky
Dan Bucatinsky
Dan Bucatinsky
Dan Bucatinsky and Sarah Wright
Dan Bucatinsky and Sarah Wright

Don Roos, Dan Bucatinsky, Jonah Bucatinsky and Eliza Bucatinsky - Photographs from the PS Arts Express Yourself Event as a variety of stars arrived at the Barker Hanger in Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 16th November 2014

Don Roos, Dan Bucatinsky, Jonah Bucatinsky and Eliza Bucatinsky

Dan Bucatinsky and Don Roos - 2013 P.S. Arts Express Yourself at Barker Hangar - Arrivals - Santa Monica, California, United States - Sunday 17th November 2013

Dan Bucatinsky and Don Roos

Dan Bucatinski and Don Roos - Express Yourself 2013 event to benefit P.S. Arts held at Santa Monica Airport - Red Carpet Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 17th November 2013

Dan Bucatinski and Don Roos

Don Roos and Dan Bucatinsky - Angel Awards 2013 presented by Project Angel Food - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Sunday 11th August 2013

Don Roos and Dan Bucatinsky

Marley & Me Review


Bad
Animal films are critical landmines. Step wrong, opinion-wise, and readers will accuse you of being everything from heartless and insensitive to PETA's public enemy number one. Clearly, Old Yeller and other four-footed tearjerkers have made canines the noblest of our beloved domesticated friends. After topping the bestseller's list with his autobiographical memoir Marley and Me, journalist John Grogan is seeing his tale of the world's worst pooch finally make it to the big screen -- and it's time to get out the tar and feathers. Instead of being uplifting and heartwarming, this excruciating effort is 90 minutes of mediocrity followed by 10 minutes of the most manipulative, mean-spirited pap ever put into a movie made for families.

When they get married, reporters John Grogan (Owen Wilson) and his new bride Jenny (Jennifer Aniston) picture themselves setting the Fourth Estate on fire. Eventually, they end up in South Florida where she handles hot button political and social stories. He, on the other hand, is relegated to writing about building fires and lame local oddities. When his sourpuss editor (Alan Arkin) offers him a column, John is unsure what to do. Taking inspiration from the new dog named Marley he just adopted, our scribe is soon scribbling stories about how this cute-as-a-button Labrador retriever is evil incarnate. Labeled "the world's worst dog," Marley lives up to the title. Even as the Grogans grow older and raise a family, they still don't know what to do with their destructive hound from Hell.

Continue reading: Marley & Me Review

Diabolique (1996) Review


Good
I've been awaiting this update of the 1955 classic French thriller with a mixture of nervous anticipation and deep-seated dread. The original Diabolique was one of the few examples of how thrillers ought to be made...and I figured Hollywood would find some way to screw up the remake. (They did, of course.)

The story is timeless. Evil boarding school principal Guy (Chazz Palmenteri) is married to ex-nun Mia (Isabelle Adjani), a nervous "child bride" with a penchant for heart medication. Guy also has at least one mistress, the cold-as-ice Nicole (Sharon Stone), and everyone knows of and quietly accepts the affair. They all work and live under the auspices of the school, and in the darkness of its halls, a plot is hatched by Mia and Nicole to do away with Guy for good. It starts to get a little hairy when, after a seemingly perfect murder is pulled off, things start to seem not-so-perfect and questions over potential witnesses and the actual life-or-death-ness of Guy begin to surface.

Continue reading: Diabolique (1996) Review

Urban Legend Review


Weak
A Scream knock-off? Yes. A good Scream knock-off? No.

Sadly, Urban Legend will be another forgotten entry into the teen horror revival fad of the late 1990's, and with good reason.

Continue reading: Urban Legend Review

Bounce Review


Bad
Great. Here I am, writing a review of yet another cheesy, clichéd, Ben Affleck romantic comedy in which I will probably be flamed by Affleck fans, Paltrow fans, romantics, teens, and widows. Yeah... widows. Why? Because Bounce is the latest in a string of contrived romantic comedies to feature a man falling for a widow whom he helped to make a widow.

Yeah... it's our old friends Bob and Harvey Weinstein, and this time they're capitalizing on plane crashes, public relations companies, alcoholics, and stalkers all in the same wicked stroke. Here we have Buddy Amaral (Affleck), just a good-old sweet talking ad rep who happens to give a free first class plane ticket to a guy named Greg (Tony Goldwyn) in order to sleep with Mimi (Natasha Henstridge... really, who wouldn't go for that)? Of course, the plane crashes, and, wouldn't you know it, he happens to rep the airlines. So he does what any person would: He drinks.

Continue reading: Bounce Review

Trapped Review


Terrible
When a screenwriter decides to write another, predictable ransom thriller, why is it always the attractive, rich families with mansions on lakes that become the hapless victims? In reality, stranger abductions hit all socio-economic groups, so why are the poor families in the movies immune? A more cynical take on the genre would find a meager family with such ransom obstacles.

In Trapped, the latest in this tiresome genre, the kidnappers' true motive is not greed, despite the fact that they request a ransom for good measure. Will Jennings (Stuart Townsend) is a successful anesthesiologist with a beautiful lakeshore home he shares with his gorgeous wife Karen (Charlize Theron) and their adorable little daughter Abby (Dakota Fanning). While Will is away at a medical conference, kidnappers Joe Hickey (Kevin Bacon) and Marvin Pool (Pruitt Taylor Vince) quietly break into the Jennings' home and take Abby. Marvin leaves with Abby and Joe stays behind with the irate Karen to guide her through his plan. Meanwhile, at the conference, Will meets up with a third accomplice in the kidnapping, Cheryl Hickey (Courtney Love) who holds him hostage in his hotel room.

Continue reading: Trapped Review

Love Field Review


OK
The death of JFK is the backdrop for this quirky and vaguely unsatisfying film, which puts Michelle Pfeiffer (Oscar nominated here) in a platinum blonde 'do and on a road trip to the Kennedy funeral with an unlikely companion: Dennis Haysbert and his young daughter. Not quite a study of civil rights in the '60s, not quite a Thelma & Louise, and not quite a relationship story, Love Field is mostly a by-the-book period drama intended as Oscar bait. This time, it worked.

Happy Endings Review


Very Good
It's easy for a talented filmmaker to get high on his own talent and fall head over heels in love with his story and characters, to the point where the audience is left somewhat on the outside, peering in through the filmmaker's structural window dressing and trying to figure out what the hell is going on. Don Roos (The Opposite of Sex) has the ability to be one of those guys, and comes close to it in his Short Cuts-esque panoramic comedy Happy Endings but avoids temptation - for the better enjoyment of everyone involved.

The title is a joke, sort of, like much of the film. It starts with a panicked Lisa Kudrow running frantically through a residential neighborhood, dashing out into the street and getting hit by a car. Then a split screen informs us that she's actually not dead, that "no one dies in this movie," and the film proceeds, in the same jokey, needling manner, to introduce us to the rest of the players in this Los Angeles smashed relationship derby. Kudrow plays Mamie, a tense woman emotionally scarred after that time in her adolescence when got pregnant and gave the baby up for adoption. That memory comes smashing back into her life when wannabe documentarian Nicky (Jesse Bradford, gloriously clueless) shows up, claiming to be friends with her son, and saying he'll reunite them, but only if Mamie helps him make his debut film. Mamie's contribution to said project is the participation of her masseuse boyfriend Javier (Bobby Cannavale), pretending to be a gigolo for the sake of Nicky's awful excuse for a documentary.

Continue reading: Happy Endings Review

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Don Roos Movies

Marley & Me Movie Review

Marley & Me Movie Review

Animal films are critical landmines. Step wrong, opinion-wise, and readers will accuse you of being...

Urban Legend Movie Review

Urban Legend Movie Review

A Scream knock-off? Yes. A good Scream knock-off? No.Sadly, Urban Legend will...

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Bounce Movie Review

Bounce Movie Review

Great. Here I am, writing a review of yet another cheesy, clichéd, Ben Affleck...

Trapped Movie Review

Trapped Movie Review

When a screenwriter decides to write another, predictable ransom thriller, why is it always the...

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