Don Mckellar

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Don McKellar and Kim Cattrall - HBO Canada's SENSITIVE SKIN screening at Scotiabank Theatre - arrival. - Toronto, Canada - Friday 18th July 2014

Don Mckellar and Kim Cattrall
Don Mckellar
Don Mckellar and Kim Cattrall
Don Mckellar and Kim Cattrall
Don Mckellar and Kim Cattrall

The Grand Seduction Trailer


Murray French is a resident in a seaside village that is struggling desperately in the face of unemployment. They have only one hope; they can have a factory built which will provide the majority of the townsfolk with income. However, to secure the permission for it to be built, they must have a doctor living nearby. Luck seems to come their way when a young medic named Dr. Paul Lewis makes his way over to the town for a month-long stay and Murray and the other villagers set about trying to indirectly convince him to stay permanently; whether that is trying to get the local postlady to flirt with him or leaving him welcome gifts. But the more they try to give him reason to stay there, the more Paul starts to feel it's not his idea of home.

Continue: The Grand Seduction Trailer

Don McKellar - In conversation with Sensitive Skin's Kim Cattrall, Don McKellar and Bob Martin at the inaugural Canadian International Television Festival (CITF) at TIFF Bell Lightbox. - Toronto, Canada - Sunday 17th November 2013

Don Mckellar
Don Mckellar
Kim Cattrall, Bob Martin and Don Mckellar
Kim Cattrall, Bob Martin and Don Mckellar
Don Mckellar, Kim Cattrall and Bob Martin

Don McKellar Tuesday 10th January 2012 15th Annual Toronto Film Critics Association Awards at The Carlu Toronto, Canada

Don Mckellar
Don Mckellar
Don Mckellar

Callum Keith Rennie, Bruce McDonald, Daniel MacIvor, Don McKellar and Molly Parker - Callum Keith Rennie, Don McKellar, Bruce McDonald, Daniel MacIvor , Molly Parker, and Charlie McDonald (front) Toronto, Canada - The 35th Toronto International Film Festival - 'Trigger' premiere arrival at the TIFF Lightbox on the grand opening day of the new TIFF headquarters in the entertainment district of Toronto. Sunday 12th September 2010

Callum Keith Rennie, Bruce Mcdonald, Daniel Macivor, Don Mckellar and Molly Parker
Callum Keith Rennie
Callum Keith Rennie
Callum Keith Rennie
Bruce Mcdonald, Callum Keith Rennie, Daniel Macivor and Molly Parker

Blindness Review


Bad
Fernando Meirelles' Blindness was adapted from the novel written by Portuguese Nobel-laureate Jose Saramago. The novel follows a singular woman who somehow goes uninfected when a sudden, freakish plague of "white blindness" strikes the planet, leaving her the sole witness to moral and sanitary decay and atrocities unmentionable in a prison for the infected. What was a poetic, exhaustively-brilliant piece of fiction has now become a clunky, clattering, ever-collapsing film of bludgeoning rhetoric.

The woman (Julianne Moore) tags along with her ophthalmologist husband (Mark Ruffalo) when he is struck by the blindness and sent to the initial holding facility for the infected. Visually plagued by random flashes of pure white, the film hams up Saramago's eloquent metaphor as the wards of the facility become factions. One splinter supports a dictator (Gael García Bernal) and an accountant (Maury Chaykin) who garner the entirety of the rations supplied by the army. Possessions and eventually women are traded for meager portions as the nameless woman begins to consider her tolerance in the face of a shadowy, violent orgy that even Argentine provocateur Gaspar Noé might find a little too much.

Continue reading: Blindness Review

Don McKellar and Greg Morrison - Don McKellar and Greg Morrison New York City, USA - 'The Drowsy Chaperone' Holiday Party held at 44 ½ Restaurant. Sunday 9th December 2007

Don Mckellar and Greg Morrison

Clean Review


Weak

There is one scene in Clean that sticks out to me. A supremely-groggy Nick Nolte sits at a small fast food joint and gets a small salad and water while Maggie Cheung (playing his widowed daughter-in-law) goes up to the counter and orders a monster burger, french fries, and onion rings with a large coke. It's her first real meal since getting out of prison and it's his first meal with her for god knows how long. There's a lot of symbolism, even though it's simple, being used in the scene, and it gives depth to a complicated relationship (everyone thinks she Courtney-Loved her rocker boyfriend). How did director Olivier Assayas, a seasoned pro, allow this to be one of the scant few scenes that hold any real fascination? Furthermore, how did he allow himself to write something so damn drab and insipid?

Emily (Cheung) spends the first 15 minutes of the film being the annoying Yoko to Lee (Nick Cave dead ringer and cohort James Johnston), an aging rocker trying to get a deal for his anthology. She gets nabbed for heroin possession just when she finds Lee's body but is saved by Lee's manager. Out of jail after a quick stint, she meets with Albrecht (Nolte), her father-in-law who has been raising her son Jay with his wife. It's apparent to all involved (besides Jay) that Emily needs to get clean, get a job, and take custody of her child. The journey is held up by a brief stint in Paris where she still takes pills, gets fired from a job and finally begins to detox after her musician friend Tricky (playing himself) ignores her requests for help with the custody issue.

Continue reading: Clean Review

The Red Violin Review


Excellent
A sprawling epic and a would-be masterpiece, The Red Violin is the story of an ill-fated violin, from the moment it is crafted in 1600s Italy to the day it is sold at auction in millennial Canada. The violin is passed through 1700s Vienna, to an Oxford virtuoso in the 1800s, and on to Mao's China for spell before landing in the lap of Samuel L. Jackson's instrument appraiser. Following the checkered past of such a fateful instrument makes you feel a bizarre sense of connection with it. But ultimately the movie rings a tad hollow -- with contrived plot points and an unbearable and unbelievable finale. But never mind that -- Violin is a grandiose production that should be seen and enjoyed.

Continue reading: The Red Violin Review

Last Night Review


Very Good
It's six hours until the end of the world, and Bruce Willis, Robert Duvall, and Will Smith are nowhere in sight. The world is really gonna end -- so what do you do with those six hours?

I rarely read film production notes, but writer/director/star Don McKellar's introduction to Last Night caught my eye this time. I quote, "The world is ending, once again. But this time, in my movie, there is no overburdened loner duking it out with the asteroid, no presidents or generals turning the tables on extra-terrestrials. Those heroes are out there, somewhere, one hopes, but I was interested in the rest of us suckers--hapless individuals who, with limited access to nuclear resources, would have to come to terms with the fast-approaching finale."

Continue reading: Last Night Review

Existenz Review


Excellent
Well, Cronenberg is back, and after a couple of misfires like Crash, M. Butterfly, and well, pretty much the last ten years of his oeuvre, he's got a solid flick with eXistenZ. In fact, I'd say it's his best work since 1983's Videodrome.

The story is straight outta modern/near-future pop culture: Using a "bioport," you can jack your body and mind into an immersive game world--a world served up by a handheld bio-engineered creature called a "game pod" that is essentially a blood-pulsing Nintendo. There are no computers in the film: just the mutated organisms that are Cronenberg's trademark. And oh does he put them to good use.

Continue reading: Existenz Review

Childstar Review


Good
In this smart but inconsistent look at the concept of celebrity, Canadian indie favorite Don McKellar pulls triple-duty -- writing, directing, and starring -- for the first time in seven years. That year, 1998, McKellar caught the eye of the international film audience with his end-of-the-world diary Last Night, and the ambitious epic The Red Violin, which he co-wrote. In comparison to those fine contributions, Childstar is lightweight stuff and sub-par McKellar.

Having conceived the idea for Childstar after a chance Oscar party conversation with Haley Joel Osment, McKellar stars as Rick, an experimental filmmaker who becomes the limo driver for Taylor Brandon Burns (great name!) a spoiled 12-year-old American superstar (Mark Rendall) shooting a new film in Canada. That movie, The First Son, is a ridiculous piece of jingoistic drivel where the President's son kicks some terrorist ass in order to save Dad, the White House and the whole damn country.

Continue reading: Childstar Review

Roadkill Review


Very Good
The only way to make the road trip even stranger is to have it take place in Canada.

Following in the tradition of such odd traveling yarns as Jim Jarmusch's Down by Law comes Bruce McDonald's (Hard Core Logo) low-budget rock and roll odyssey.

Continue reading: Roadkill Review

Waydowntown Review


OK
"It's sucking my will to live!" quipped Garth of Wayne's World. Now, is that corporate America's fault, or our insistence of living in the closeted environment of our careers instead of acknowledging the outside world? How long could we go through the same corridors, talking to the same exact people, day in and day out, without losing our mental faculties?

Tom (Fabrizio Filippo), Sandra (Marya Delver), Randy (Tobias Godson), and Curt (Gordon Currie) are, possibly due to boredom, in the midst of a bet to see who can survive the longest without leaving the corridors and buildings that connect their downtown area. A month's worth of salary is at stake to prove their stubborn will surpasses their peers. What helps is that most of the area near their office is connected to life's necessities though passages that join one building to the next. Hence, they are able to go home at night, eat food at the mall, and so on without having to actually encounter the great urban outdoors.

Continue reading: Waydowntown Review

The Event Review


Bad
Who wouldn't want to have a party before they died? In The Event, Matt Shapiro (Don McKellar), a talented young cello player dying of AIDS, decides to do just that before having his friends and family help him to kill himself. Everyone gets together, blasts music, has champagne, and twirls under the disco ball, wishing Matt a fond farewell into the afterlife. This is all well and good until district attorney Nick (Parker Posey) starts nosing into Matt's death, noting that several of the recently dead people who were under the care of AIDS clinic worker, and Matt's friend, Brian (Brent Carver), died with unusually high amounts of drugs in their system.

Although director and co-writer Thom Fitzgerald sets us up for a mystery at the beginning of the film - Who is Matt? Did he commit suicide? What will Nick find? - the story quickly derails into an extremely sappy and self-indulgent amble through Matt's life, which didn't seem to be terribly interesting. We are given hardly anything of Matt prior to his disease, he is only presented as an AIDS victim, and one particularly prone to flights of self-pity. While The Event is refreshingly candid about many of the particulars of the disease, resisting the melodramatic impulse to keep the more physically unpleasant aspects of it hidden away, it is much less honest and forthcoming about Matt's relationships.

Continue reading: The Event Review

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Don McKellar Movies

The Grand Seduction Trailer

The Grand Seduction Trailer

Murray French is a resident in a seaside village that is struggling desperately in the...

Blindness Trailer

Blindness Trailer

Watch the trailer for BlindnessWhat would you do if a virus was spreading blindness so...

Blindness Movie Review

Blindness Movie Review

Fernando Meirelles' Blindness was adapted from the novel written by Portuguese Nobel-laureate Jose Saramago. The...

Existenz Movie Review

Existenz Movie Review

Well, Cronenberg is back, and after a couple of misfires like Crash, M. Butterfly, and...

waydowntown Movie Review

waydowntown Movie Review

"It's sucking my will to live!" quipped Garth of Wayne's World. Now, is that...

The Event Movie Review

The Event Movie Review

Who wouldn't want to have a party before they died? In The Event, Matt Shapiro...

The Red Violin Movie Review

The Red Violin Movie Review

Like a blending of great symphony and great cinema, "The Red Violin" is a magnum...

Existenz Movie Review

Existenz Movie Review

Abandon the deep-seeded sexual-social metaphors and waterdown the ick factor, and DavidCronenberg's "eXistenZ" could be...

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