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The Final Conflict Review


OK
The third installment in the Omen series -- and popularly referred to as just The Omen III instead of its "official" name -- wraps up the story of Damien Thorn, starting where we expect and finishing up with its logical conclusion. Easily the weakest entry in the trilogy (a fourth was made -- for cable -- but it's widely ignored as non-canon), it's lacks the thrills of the first two entries, but it's still a watchable experience.

Damien is now grown up, and being played by a creepy Sam Neill with such menacing fire that it's a miracle his career recovered to the point where he'd become mostly known for blonde "good guys." Having run Thorn Industries for seven years, Damien uses his powers to coerce the American ambassador to England into committing suicide, then finagles the appointment for himself. Exactly why he needs such a job is never explained, but it does bring the story full circle, as Damien's original dad in The Omen held that very position.

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Bullitt Review


OK
For all of the talk about its legendary car chase through the streets of San Francisco -- and it is justified -- Bullitt idles far tool long in the slow lane when it should be blowing by the minivans and the carpoolers. Even the presence of Steve McQueen, with his laid-back, self-assured cool, can't save it.

McQueen plays Frank Bullitt, a celebrated lieutenant with the San Francisco Police Department, assigned to protect a celebrity witness in a Senate subcommittee meeting on organized crime. When the witness is killed in his hotel room, Bullitt has little time to discover the truth before the city's powerful DA (Robert Vaughn) unleashes his wrath.

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Papillon Review


Very Good
There's a lot to like about Papillon. Compared to the witless blockbusters of today, with their explosions and CGI trickery, Papillon is the type of outsized escapist adventure tale that Hollywood once had down pat. It's well acted, gorgeously shot, and generally exciting -- all of which makes its mediocrity an even greater disappointment.

The trouble lies in its placement in the evolution of the Hollywood action film. Papillon is a transitional species. At the same time it soars on old-fashioned virtue, it also suffers from modern vice. Its 150-minute running time, false endings, and mind-numbing repetitions make it an early predecessor of the indulgent blockbuster of today.

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The Mack Review


Weak
Scraping the bottom of blaxploitation is this cult classic, The Mack, featuing Max Julien as an ex-con straight outta the slammer and looking to re-take his place at the top of the Oakland pimp scene. Good God, for two hours this dribbles on, filled with big hats, elaborate canes, and tons and tons of hos. While Richard Pryor's appearance threatens to elevate The Mack above pure crap, the tired and incredibly offensive story merits virtually no attention.

The Beast Within Review


Bad
Really, truly Godawful werewolfish kind of movie, which gives us Ronny Cox and Bibi Besch, the latter of whom gives birth after being raped by a werewolf, starting the cycle over again and again and oh the humanity. Though it has a few creepy scenes -- including one grotesquely unforgettable transformation -- the movie on the whole is a real disaster. Nonsense, hammy acting, and the most tired of plots... it's a Beast indeed.

The Borrower Review


Bad
The Borrower is another movie in which a hideous, murderous space creature (which looks like a low-budget version of the monster in Alien) runs to Earth, borrows human heads and wanders around Chicago. The creature kills many people. In the sequel, it will kill a lot more. Sooner or later, we'll all die of old age.

The Borrower, directed by John McNaughton (who directed Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer, briefly mentioned in this film), is one more movie in this hoary tradition. Movies just like this air weekly on cable, so why do actors, writers and directors bother to make more? Why not just show one from a couple of years back that nobody saw?

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Dev Patel Is A Lost Boy In Touching True Story Drama 'Lion'

Dev Patel Is A Lost Boy In Touching True Story Drama 'Lion'

There's already an Oscars buzz surrounding this movie.

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