Dominic Monaghan

Dominic Monaghan

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GREAT British Film Reception

Dominic Monaghan - GREAT British Film Reception to honor the British nominees of the 86th Annual Academy Awards (Oscars) - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 28th February 2014

Dominic Monaghan
Dominic Monaghan
Dominic Monaghan
Dominic Monaghan

NBA 2K14 Premiere Party 8

Dominic Monaghan - Celebrities attend NBA 2K14 Premiere Party at Greystone Manor. - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Wednesday 25th September 2013

Young Hollywood Awards 2013

Dominic Monaghan - 2013 Young Hollywood Awards at The Broad Stage - Red Carpet - Santa Monic, CA, United States - Friday 2nd August 2013

Dominic Monaghan
Dominic Monaghan
Dominic Monaghan

2013 Young Hollywood Awards

Dominic Monaghan - 2013 Young Hollywood Awards at The Broad Stage - Red Carpet - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Thursday 1st August 2013

Dominic Monaghan
Dominic Monaghan
Dominic Monaghan
Dominic Monaghan
Dominic Monaghan

The World Premiere of Disney/Jerry Bruckheimer Films' 'The Lone Ranger'

Dominic Monaghan - The World Premiere of Disney/Jerry Bruckheimer Films' 'The Lone Ranger' at Disney California Adventure Park - Outside Arrivals - Hollywood, California, United States - Saturday 22nd June 2013

Video - Dominic Monaghan Wants To Inspire Viewers in New Nature Series


'Lost' star Dominic Monaghan discusses why he wants to make his nature TV series 'Wild Things' at the Rogers Upfront 2012 presentation in Toronto. He is aiming to inspire people to interact with animals and nature and describes these kinds of interactions as 'profound'.

The 35-year-old is probably best known for his part as Meriadoc Brandybuck in 'The Lord of the Rings' trilogy as well as playing Charlie Pace in the TV series 'Lost'. His co-star in the cancelled series, Matthew Fox, has recently been accused of assaulting a female bus driver after she refused him access on to her private bus. Monaghan maintains that this is true and apparently hasn't spoken to him 'for years'

The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers Review


Good
Need I provide a pithy introduction to The Two Towers, the second installment in The Lord of the Rings trilogy? It's more hobbits, orcs, swords, and sorcery, so if you sawThe Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (and why would you be reading this if you hadn't?), you know what to expect.

And it's expectations that director Peter Jackson has clearly found himself having to address in this movie. Given that all three films in the series were shot simultaneously, Jackson doesn't have much opportunity to introduce new stuff with each movie. We're well familiarized with the main characters and the primary settings, so much of the weight falls on the new people and creatures introduced in this episode to carry the story.

Continue reading: The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers Review

The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring Review


Good
You think Harry Potter had expectations? It's a beloved book, sure, but it was published in 1997. In 10 years it will be as forgotten as The Bridges of Madison County. But J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings series dates all the way back to 1937 (when The Hobbit was published), and it's taken all these decades for someone to even attempt a live-action recreation of the trilogy of books. And not without reason.

How do you satisfy a legion of fans, some of whom have been waiting almost 65 years to see their absolute favorite work of literature put to film? More often than not, you don't, and though Peter Jackson's production of The Lord of the Rings is painstakingly faithful and earnest, it is almost a foregone conclusion that the movie will never quite be good enough for the obsessed fans (see also the 1978 animated Lord), just is it will be far too obtuse for those who haven't read the books.

Continue reading: The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring Review

The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Review


Excellent
Peter Jackson returns with his third and final installment in The Lord of the Rings trilogy with the explosive - and exhausting - conclusion to his acclaimed series. Let's cut to the chase: Jackson's final entry is the best of the series, largely thanks to his pushing the boundaries of digital effects to their very limits.

Picking up after a flashback to Sméagol/Gollum's discovery of the ring many years earlier, the film then takes us back to the twin stories from Fellowship andThe Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers: Gandalf (Ian McKellen) and company are basking in the glory of victory at Helm's Deep and Isengard, while Frodo (Elijah Wood), Sam (Sean Astin), and Gollum trek toward Mount Doom to destroy the ring.

Continue reading: The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Review

Ringers: Lord of the Fans Review


OK
Every good geek franchise has a corresponding picture about its freaky fanatics. Star Trek has Trekkies (1 and 2), Star Wars has The Phandom Menace, and Lord of the Rings has Master of the Rings. Er, and this film, Ringers (a term I don't believe is actually used by anyone, but I guess it's less insulting than "lordies" or "ringies"), which feels more than a little late to the party.

Ringers isn't just a fun-poking exercise like most of its brethern. Primarily it's an exhaustive history of Lord of the Rings, from J.R.R. Tolkein's life and times through such curiosities as Leonard Nimoy's ballad of Bilbo Baggins (google it) to the animated attempts at making the books into movies in the 1970s and '80s. Sure, the fans are covered, in part, and there are a few gems among them. My favorites are the ones who claim to be really into Tolkein, yet show up at the film's "confessional" booth dressed as Klingons or, inexplicably, as Johnny Depp's character from Pirates of the Caribbean. This largely passes without comment: In fact, that's the movie's major failing. It's far too respectful -- fawning, really -- of the obsessed fan base of Lord of the Rings to be truly entertaining. Hell, Dominic Monaghan, who played one of the hobbits, narrates the thing with an air of something that approaches austerity.

Continue reading: Ringers: Lord of the Fans Review

Lost: Season One Review


Grim
Agatha Christie wrote something in excess of 80 novels. Christie was a practiced and a brilliant mystery taleteller, a commercial writer who exploited her full and total grasp of the mystery genre to massive popular success. Each plot was intricately realized, no facet of the mystery introduced that could not be resolved. Such is the enjoyment of good mysteries: a confidence that although clues and complications have confused us for now, in the end the equation will make sense. We should not know the ending, but it should not be impossible to work out. Lost, 2004's hit about a group of plane-wreck survivors milling about on a mysterious island, crashes and burns on its inability to handle the genre Christie had mastered. Not so much a whodunit as a "whatisit," Lost never seems confident that it can provide the answers to the questions it asks.

Before triangulating the discombobulating mystery that anchors Lost's first 24 episodes, it is necessary to acknowledge the brilliance of the program's premise. An aircraft traveling from Sydney to L.A. crashes, and part of the plane lands on an island somewhere in the South Pacific. Several survivors emerge from the wreckage to take pole positions as the show's cast, and slowly but surely, as some semblance of society is established, we get flashbacks into their previous mainland lives. This design leads to situations such as this: Jack (Matthew Fox) is falling for Kate (Evangeline Lilly). However, as dramatic irony would have it, the viewers know that Kate was actually a gun-wielding fugitive in her pre-island life. Watch out, Jack! This conceit of letting the audience in on the characters' secrets while they mingle obliviously with each other is Lost's greatest power. Nevertheless, creator J.J. Abrams was not content with just that.

Continue reading: Lost: Season One Review

The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers Review


Good
Need I provide a pithy introduction to The Two Towers, the second installment in The Lord of the Rings trilogy? It's more hobbits, orcs, swords, and sorcery, so if you saw The Fellowship of the Ring (and why would you be reading this if you hadn't?), you know what to expect.

And it's expectations that director Peter Jackson has clearly found himself having to address in this movie. Given that all three films in the series were shot simultaneously, Jackson doesn't have much opportunity to introduce new stuff with each movie. We're well familiarized with the main characters and the primary settings, so much of the weight falls on the new people and creatures introduced in this episode to carry the story.

Continue reading: The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers Review

The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring Review


Good
You think Harry Potter had expectations? It's a beloved book, sure, but it was published in 1997. In 10 years it will be as forgotten as The Bridges of Madison County. But J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings series dates all the way back to 1937 (when The Hobbit was published), and it's taken all these decades for someone to even attempt a live-action recreation of the trilogy of books. And not without reason.

How do you satisfy a legion of fans, some of whom have been waiting almost 65 years to see their absolute favorite work of literature put to film? More often than not, you don't, and though Peter Jackson's production of The Lord of the Rings is painstakingly faithful and earnest, it is almost a foregone conclusion that the movie will never quite be good enough for the obsessed fans (see also the 1978 animated Lord), just is it will be far too obtuse for those who haven't read the books.

Continue reading: The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring Review

The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Review


Excellent
Peter Jackson returns with his third and final installment in The Lord of the Rings trilogy with the explosive - and exhausting - conclusion to his acclaimed series. Let's cut to the chase: Jackson's final entry is the best of the series, largely thanks to his pushing the boundaries of digital effects to their very limits.

Picking up after a flashback to Sméagol/Gollum's discovery of the ring many years earlier, the film then takes us back to the twin stories from Fellowship and The Two Towers: Gandalf (Ian McKellen) and company are basking in the glory of victory at Helm's Deep and Isengard, while Frodo (Elijah Wood), Sam (Sean Astin), and Gollum trek toward Mount Doom to destroy the ring.

Continue reading: The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Review

Lord Of The Rings:
the Two Towers Review


OK

Unless you're a "Lord of the Rings" superfan, you'd better brush up on "Fellowship of the Ring" before seeing the sequel "The Two Towers," because director Peter Jackson just jumps right in to the middle of the story without much in the way of introductions or explanations.

He assumes you know who Hobbits Merry and Pippin are and why they've been abducted by the Uruk-Hai, the beastly minions of unseen supernatural villain Sauron (you know all about them, right?). He assumes you recall where "Fellowship" left off with human warrior Aragorn (Viggo Mortensen) and Elfin archer Legolas (Orlando Bloom), and why they're trying to rescue Merry and Pippin.

He also assumes you know that hero Hobbits Frodo and Sam (Elijah Wood and Sean Austin) are still trying to reach the kingdom of Mordor, where they are to cast the dangerously omnipotent Ring into the volcanic fires of Mount Doom, thus keeping it out of the hands Sauron, who would use its dark psychic powers to lay waste to the world.

Continue reading: Lord Of The Rings:
the Two Towers Review

Dominic Monaghan

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Dominic Monaghan

Date of birth

8th December, 1976

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.70