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Dom DeLuise's Eat This... It'll Make You Feel Better series Signature dish: Death by Chocolate cake - . . . .Did they eat it? Of course. You'll eat anything if you're 'fame-ished'! - Monday 29th July 2013

Dom Deluise

Oliver & Company Review


OK
Disney's animated version of Dickens' Oliver Twist, Oliver & Company, is a true oddity in the Disney canon. For starters, the animation style is completely different from anything else in its repertoire. Obviously inspired by Ralph Bakshi (of Felix the Cat fame), the movie features garish perspectives, serious abuse of zoom (in almost every scene), and an attempt at urban grittiness which Walt Disney never knew in his entire life.

And yet here it is, Oliver & Company, wherein an orphaned kitten falls in with a crowd of dogs-cum-hustlers, only to end up adopted into a rich girl's house. A kidnappng and rescue plot (pushing the boundaries of the G rating) ensues -- ironically, it's the best part of the movie.

Continue reading: Oliver & Company Review

Silent Movie Review


Good
Mel Brooks has never exactly been a master of subtlety. He's also never known when a joke is worthy of a five-minute bit and when it's something you can flesh out into a full length feature.

Silent Movie is exactly what it says in the title: An honest to God silent film. In fact, it's a silent film about the making of a silent film. Brooks plays, basically, himself, a movie producer who's trying to get funding for the first silent film in 40 years. The studio is on the verge of bankruptcy, and our hero attempts to save the studio by rustling up Hollywood's biggest stars to appear in the show. They play themselves and, indeed, represent some of Hollywood's biggest stars.

Continue reading: Silent Movie Review

Silent Movie Review


Good
Mel Brooks has never exactly been a master of subtlety. He's also never known when a joke is worthy of a five-minute bit and when it's something you can flesh out into a full length feature.

Silent Movie is exactly what it says in the title: An honest to God silent film. In fact, it's a silent film about the making of a silent film. Brooks plays, basically, himself, a movie producer who's trying to get funding for the first silent film in 40 years. The studio is on the verge of bankruptcy, and our hero attempts to save the studio by rustling up Hollywood's biggest stars to appear in the show. They play themselves and, indeed, represent some of Hollywood's biggest stars.

Continue reading: Silent Movie Review

The Secret Of NIMH Review


Very Good
Never mind the G rating, this is scary stuff which sent my little one fleeing to another room inside of 10 minutes. Between the cat attacks and murderous rats, there's a lot of terror in The Secret of NIMH, but slightly older kids will likely thrill to the Harry Potter-like adventure here, which has a widowed mouse trying to figure out how to move her cinder block house and three children to safety before the plowing begins and rips them all to shreds. So, of course, she turns to the genetically enhanced rats down the way, who overcome their own obstacles before coming to a magical, sword-slinging rescue. Quite the finale.

The Muppet Movie Review


Excellent
Like most movies of its year, The Muppet Movie looks (and is) really dated. But it's worth it to willingly suspend disbelief at how dated it is --- to appreciate the good-natured humor and comedic flair of Jim Henson. Henson tried to entertain both kids and adults, and though both audiences were probably easier to please in the days before all comedy became irony-soaked, Henson was one of the first to add sly postmodern touches. And while the movie promotes the annoying myth of Hollywood as the dream factory, magic store, etc. it more than makes up for it by borrowing comedians from several generations, from then-new comics like Steve Martin and Elliott Gould to veterans like Bob Hope and Orson Welles(!), for an endless string of cameo appearances.

The plot loosely follows the odyssey of Kermit the Frog from his swamp home to Hollywood in search of celebrity. The desirability of fame and stardom is never questioned. The Hollywood worship becomes pretty maudlin at the end, thanks mainly to songwriter Paul Williams, whose songs are palatable at first ("Rainbow Connection" was a hit) but become too much before the end of the movie.

Continue reading: The Muppet Movie Review

The Glass Bottom Boat Review


OK
In 1966, The Glass Bottom Boat found Doris Day in the final days of her career (she retired in 1968 at age 44), seen here wearing an ill-advised bob and carrying some lingering pregnancy fat in a procession of increasingly hideous outfits. Those who remember Day as the gossamer girl from Pillow Talk and its ilk will be downright shocked to see Day dressed up in all yellow and looking like a rotting banana.

I'm being a little cruel, yes, but Boat is a pretty thin picture anyway and it doesn't merit a whole lot of sympathy. The story involves a misunderstanding (imagine that!) wherein Day is mistaken for a spy. Eventually she plays the part (when she isn't busy romancing Rod Taylor), when she isn't stuck in compromising positions with Dom DeLuise and/or Paul Lynde.

Continue reading: The Glass Bottom Boat Review

Baby Geniuses Review


Terrible
Is it possible for a movie to be insulting from beginning to end, without pause at all along the way? As it turns out, yes indeed! Baby Geniuses, widely hailed as one of the worst movies of the 1990s, if not one of the worst of all time, would be completely forgettable if it weren't so deeply disturbing. Medical experimentation on human babies, now there's a movie idea for ya! And adopting Babe-like morphing to make these babies appear to speak is just plain wrong.

Continue reading: Baby Geniuses Review

The Cannonball Run Review


OK
One weekday morning in 1982, several boys in my fourth grade class, including yours truly, suddenly fell ill and needed to go home from school. Teachers feared an epidemic, and they were right. We had The Cannonball Run fever, and the only cure was not missing its debut on pay cable.

The next day in recess, freshly recovered from our afflictions, we traded reviews, and they were unanimous raves. We all thought the movie was hilarious and kick-ass, and for tween-to-teen boys, it really hit on all cylinders - fast cars racing, dick jokes, fast cars jumping, PG-level sex, fast cars exploding, xenophobic humor, and a big fistfight. This movie had it all.

Continue reading: The Cannonball Run Review

Oliver & Company Review


OK
Disney's animated version of Dickens' Oliver Twist, Oliver & Company, is a true oddity in the Disney canon. For starters, the animation style is completely different from anything else in its repertoire. Obviously inspired by Ralph Bakshi (of Felix the Cat fame), the movie features garish perspectives, serious abuse of zoom (in almost every scene), and an attempt at urban grittiness which Walt Disney never knew in his entire life.

And yet here it is, Oliver & Company, wherein an orphaned kitten falls in with a crowd of dogs-cum-hustlers, only to end up adopted into a rich girl's house. A kidnappng and rescue plot (pushing the boundaries of the G rating) ensues -- ironically, it's the best part of the movie.

Continue reading: Oliver & Company Review

Baby Geniuses Review


Zero

"Baby Geniuses" doesn't waste any time gettingstupid. The first scene is a bunch of bozo Orwellian security guards beingkarate-chopped to a pulp by a brainiac toddler who is trying to escapethe lab of an evil scientist.

The evil scientist is Christopher Lloyd, forever lit frombelow to make his worn-out elastic face look sinister. His evil boss isan Ivana-ized Kathleen Turner, in what has to be the most embarrassingrole of her tail-spinning career, as the scenery-chewing CEO of Baby Co.,a kiddie product conglomerate that is secretly experimenting on babiesto discover if they know the secrets of the universe.

Don't ask.

Continue reading: Baby Geniuses Review

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Baby Geniuses Movie Review

Baby Geniuses Movie Review

"Baby Geniuses" doesn't waste any time gettingstupid. The first scene is a bunch of bozo...

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