The reviews are overwhelmingly positive for the videogame-themed Wreck-It Ralph, something that will come as a welcome relief to the workforce at Disney Animation, who have had to endure years of negative comparisons with their corporate siblings at Pixar. Several critics complain that there's much too much videogame-like running around and crashing in the movie, but that's easily offset by what A.O. Scott in The New York Times calls, a 93-minute blast of color, noise, ingenuity and fun and what Roger Ebert in the Chicago Sun-Times calls tireless originality and what Kyle Smith in the New York Post describes as some brilliant flashes of wit. Indeed, Peter Hartlaub in the San Francisco Chronicle comments, It's rare that a minute goes by without at least one inspired moment. Several critics note that the movie may owe its existence to the pioneering Disney film Tron, which was also set in the world of videogames. But Wreck-It digs deeper, writes Betsy Sharkey in the Los Angeles Times, about the ways in which the electronic world has redefined human interaction -- the isolation it can breed, the inculcation of a winner/loser class divide, the very social Strata that turn out to be remarkably fragile when someone resists. But other critics maintain that all that falderal can't make up for a weak plot. Joe Morgenstern in the Wall Street Journal poses the question, [Can] brilliant animation alone can sustain a film that comes up short in dramatic development. (Spoiler alert: No, it can't.)